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MIN 12.13.2016 CC-WMinutes of a Meeting of the Governing Body of the City of Georgetown, Texas Tuesday, December 13, 2016 The Georgetown City Council will meet on Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at 3:30 PM at the Council Chambers, at 101 E. 711 St., Georgetown, Texas The city of Georgetown is committed to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you require assistance in participating at a public meeting due to a disability, as defined under the ADA, reasonable assistance, adaptations, or accommodations will be provided upon request. Please contact the City Secretary's Office, at least four (4) days prior to the scheduled meeting date, at (512) 930-3652 or City Hall at 113 East 8" Street for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. Mayor Ross called the meeting to order at 3:34 PM. All Councilmembers were in attendance, with the exception of Councilmember Gonzalez, District 7, who arrived at 4:10 PM. Policy Development/Review Workshop — Call to order at 3:34 PM A. Review of the City's FY 2016 Fourth Quarter Financial Report, which includes the Investment Reports for the City of Georgetown, Georgetown Transportation Enhancement Corporation (GTEC), and the Georgetown Economic Development Corporation (GEDCO); and review of preliminary year-end budget variances for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2016 — Leigh Wallace, Finance Director Leigh Wallace, Finance Director, provided a presentation on FY2016 Fourth Quarter Report and the FY2016 Preliminary Year -End Variance Analysis. Wallace explained there would be several finance related items that would also be action items on the regular agenda later that evening. Wallace spoke on the purpose of the process. • 40 Quarter Report and Preliminary Year -End provide a picture of the financial condition of the City • Numbers are not yet audited or final Compare projections to actuals Wallace provided a chart on the General Fund Revenue GroRcii&N Tf", General Fund Revenue She explained that property taxes are on target. Wallace said that sales tax had done quite well throughout 2016 and spoke of the help from one time bumps from the data center. Wallace said that sales tax could change in the future and spoke on the fees and fines of different departments and return on investment revenues. ProjectedYE per PreamimryActual RevenueType Rudgetasof asof $Variance %Variance July26,2016 Sept.30,2016 Property Tax $11,673,060 $11,636,698 ($36,362) (0.3%) Sales Tax $12,357,361 $12,679,188 ;$321,827 2.6% All Other Revenues $30.297.652 $30,089.475 ($208,1771 (0.7%) Totalftesenue - $54,328.073.. $54,405,361 $77,288 0.1% She explained that property taxes are on target. Wallace said that sales tax had done quite well throughout 2016 and spoke of the help from one time bumps from the data center. Wallace said that sales tax could change in the future and spoke on the fees and fines of different departments and return on investment revenues. Wallace next provided a chart of the General Fund Expenses, explained by divisions. Wallace explained that the numbers reflect the Council approved changes for the Fire Department. 0 or.<a nrv:n General Fund Expenses Wallace noted that some variances come from vacant positions. The General Fund Balance was shown next, including the transfer to the Council SRF. General Fund Balance • Including transfer to Council SRF Projected YE per Budget as of July 26, 2016 Fund Balance $9,154,300 Prel'uminaryActual as of Sept.30,2016 $10,645,485 $Variance %variance $1,491,185 16.3% Wallace explained that the fund is in very good condition and is $1.5 million dollars above what was projected. She explained that the emergency fund reserve is accounted for and the Council Special Fund of $750,000.00 will now be higher. Wallace said staff will come back to Council with accurate final numbers in the near future. Projected YE per PreliminaryActual Expense Type Budget as of as of $Variance %Variance July26,2016 Sept. 30,2016 Downtown & Community Services $9,844,300 $9,800,872 $43,428 0.4% Finance & Admin $561,439 $541,204 $20,230 3.6% Fire lermnded 10-24-10161 $11,810,683 $11,815,511 ($4,428) (0.1%) GUS $7,443,255 $6,9W,627 $542,628 7.3% Management Services $6,379,556 $6,182,599 $196,957 3.1% Police $14,000,500 $13,553,097 $447,403 3.296 Transportation $3,789,723 $3,603,267 $186,456 4.9% Transfers $1,512,955 $1,531,334 ($18,3791 1.2% Total Expenses $55,342,411 $53,928,514 $1,413,897 1.5% Wallace noted that some variances come from vacant positions. The General Fund Balance was shown next, including the transfer to the Council SRF. General Fund Balance • Including transfer to Council SRF Projected YE per Budget as of July 26, 2016 Fund Balance $9,154,300 Prel'uminaryActual as of Sept.30,2016 $10,645,485 $Variance %variance $1,491,185 16.3% Wallace explained that the fund is in very good condition and is $1.5 million dollars above what was projected. She explained that the emergency fund reserve is accounted for and the Council Special Fund of $750,000.00 will now be higher. Wallace said staff will come back to Council with accurate final numbers in the near future. City Manager, David Morgan, added that staff would follow the same process that was followed last year and the accurate numbers will be brought to the Council after the final audit. Wallace displayed the Debt Service Fund next. Debt Service Fund • Reflects Council'sAnticipated Appro✓al of Budget Amendment 12-132016. Wallace explained the variance is due to lower payments than budgeted. She noted that the asterisk reflects anticipated approval of budget changes later in the action items. The Joint Services Fund was shown next. Wallace said this depicts departments that provide shared services to other departments in the City. She noted that the fund came in under projected expenditures and staff has reviewed the allocations. Wallace explained that, with this fund balance, there will be no need to transfer in monies. G(ORGETOWN Joint Services Fund Projected YE PreliminaryActual per Budget as of asof $Variance %Variance July26,2016 Sept.30,2016 Fund Balance $749,366 $280,454 1$468,912) (62.6%) Internal Service Funds were discussed next. Wallace spoke of specific things on a direct allocation basis. She said the variances are mainly due to expenditure savings. Wallace explained that the revenue models are stable with few revenue changes. She noted that the self-insurance fund is in healthy condition. Wallace t. Projected YE PrellminaryActual per Budgetas of as of $Variance %Variance 1u1y26,2016 Sept.30,2016 Fund Balance $2,530,625• $1,870,004 $339,379 22.2% • Reflects Council'sAnticipated Appro✓al of Budget Amendment 12-132016. Wallace explained the variance is due to lower payments than budgeted. She noted that the asterisk reflects anticipated approval of budget changes later in the action items. The Joint Services Fund was shown next. Wallace said this depicts departments that provide shared services to other departments in the City. She noted that the fund came in under projected expenditures and staff has reviewed the allocations. Wallace explained that, with this fund balance, there will be no need to transfer in monies. G(ORGETOWN Joint Services Fund Projected YE PreliminaryActual per Budget as of asof $Variance %Variance July26,2016 Sept.30,2016 Fund Balance $749,366 $280,454 1$468,912) (62.6%) Internal Service Funds were discussed next. Wallace spoke of specific things on a direct allocation basis. She said the variances are mainly due to expenditure savings. Wallace explained that the revenue models are stable with few revenue changes. She noted that the self-insurance fund is in healthy condition. Wallace said the action items on the agenda later that evening will reflect the predictions which have been shown and will require an amendment approved by the City Council. Wallace described the Special Revenue — EMS fund. She explained that the fund was projected to have a negative balance because of the start-up needs of the Program. Wallace said the expenditures were on target and the fund was starting to line up to projections. G : mymo Special Revenue - EMS Wallace presented the Special Revenue Tourism Fund. She explained that Georgetown has become a popular destination resulting in increased revenues and expenditures. She went on to say that even though these funds wash each other out, an amendment is necessary. Wallace added that hotel occupancy tax is up by 20%. Wallace went on to speak on Other Special Revenue Funds GrORGFTo.wN ..,- �. Other Special Revenue Funds ProjectedYEper Prel4nln2ryArwal Budgetasof ProjectedYE PreliminaryActual per Budgetasof as of $Variance %Variance July26,2016 Sept.30,2016 Fund Balance ($853,003) ($826,180) $26,823 3.1% Wallace presented the Special Revenue Tourism Fund. She explained that Georgetown has become a popular destination resulting in increased revenues and expenditures. She went on to say that even though these funds wash each other out, an amendment is necessary. Wallace added that hotel occupancy tax is up by 20%. Wallace went on to speak on Other Special Revenue Funds GrORGFTo.wN ..,- �. Other Special Revenue Funds ProjectedYEper Prel4nln2ryArwal Budgetasof asof $Variance %Varlance July26,2016 Sept.30,2016 Street MainteranceTac $1,657,80 $2,028,946 $371,366 22.4% Permitting $59,052 $75,308 $16,256 27-5% CD8G(Sidewalls) - ($3,894) ($3,894) 0.0% Animal Services $169,738 $191,929 $22,191 - 13.1% tibraryReskkred• $52,754 $52,731 ($23) (0.1%) MainStreet Facade $117,879 $114,333 ($3,546) (3.09) Parks Restricted $634,444 $987,778 $353,334 55.7% (Tree Fund ParNxd & Pah) • Reflects Council's Anticipated Approval of Budget Amendment 12-13-2016. Other Special Revenue Funds $75,195 ProlectedYEper PretiminaryActual $720,000 $363,400 ($356,600) Budgetasof asof $variance %Variance JuIV26,2016 Sept. 30,2016 $2,281,565 $2,297,829 Police Restricted $121,648 $133,703 $12,055 9.9% Firellilling $58,262 $36,873 ($21,389) (36.7%) Conservalim $390,534 $452,907 $62,373 16.0% Council DiSMII0r3ry $185,005 $185,694 $649 0.4% Cemetery $399,673 $401.,659 $1,986 0.5% Court Fees $56,593 $43,167 (%%426) (23.7%) Min $287,148 $309,735 $22,587 7.9% w Ifpa d,Plo $439 $440 $1 0.2% PEGrtt $175,589 $176,090 $501 o.3% Wallace explained the savings in the street maintenance fund was due to holding off on fog seal. More savings on expenditures were experienced from the delay of Founders Park. Wallace said staff would be coming to Council in January with the necessary roll forward amendments. Wallace explained that the library fund would need an amendment later in an action item because there were more donations than predicted. Councilmember Brainard asked if the City was spending out of the Cemetery fund. Paul Diaz, the City's Budget Manager, said that in FY2017, $250,000.00 will be spent on the columbadum, which will generate future revenue. He explained that the fund would continue to grow. City Manager, David Morgan, added that staff would provide the Council with exact figures in the near future. The Stormwater Drainage Fund was shown next. Wallace explained that there were fewer bond and grant proceeds and CIP projects would be discussed at a later date. Groner m"N Stormwater Drainage Fund Stormwater Drainage Projected YE per Preh"naryActual 8udgetasof as of JuIV26,2016 Sept.30,2016 $Variance %Variance Revenues., Operating $3,213,564 $3,288,759 $75,195 2.3% Non -Operating $720,000 $363,400 ($356,600) (49.5%) Expenses: Operating $2,281,565 $2,297,829 ($16,6241 (0.7%) Non -Operating $1,809,794 $1,544,820 $264,974 14.6% Fund Balance $1,554,508 $1,521,813 ($32,695) (2.1%) Wallace said there was good news with the Airport Fund, which now has a balance of $330,000.00 to the positive. The fund was predicted to have a slightly positive balance, but is much healthier than predicted. Wallace attributed this to lease and fuel revenues. Airport Fund Projected YE per PreliiminaryActual Budgetasof as of July26,2016 Sept. 30,2016 $Variance %Variance Revenues. Operating $2,759,231 $2,866,783 $107,552 3.9% Non -Operating $50,000 $90,229 $40,229 80.5% Expenses: $6,642,373 $8,498,116 $1,855,743 27.9% Operating $2,544,028 $2,435,379 $108,469 4.3% Non -Operating- $1,013,672 $1,004,214 $9,458 0.9% Fund Balance $43.849 $309,736 $265,887 606.4% Councilmember Gipson thanked staff and said the media should pick up on this. He noted that it needs to be publicized because of all the negative press in the past. Wallace said the Airport and Transportation staff are doing a wonderful job. Councilmember Jonrowe added that the GTAB Board should also receive recognition. Wallace displayed the Water Funds next She explained that operating revenues are up, primarily due to customer growth and savings in the Chisholm Trail operating expense. Wallace said the asterisks on the water fund represent amendments because of the electric fund, which will be noted later in the presentation. G r<mcr trnan Water Funds Projected YE per PreliminaryActual Budget as of as of JulY26,2016 Sept. 30,2016 $Variance %Variance Revenues., Operating $42,042,687 $45,215,145 $3,172,458 7.6% Non -Operating $6,642,373 $8,498,116 $1,855,743 27.9% Expenses: - Operating $32,153,130• $30,440,792 $1,712,338. 6.3% Non -Operating $48,104,534• $18,227,144 $29,877.390 62.1% FundBafance $38,126,2114 $54,744,140 $36,617,929 2065% • ReRectsCouncil'sAnticipaled Approval of Budget Amendment 12-13.2016. Wallace spoke on the Electric Fund. She spoke on significant events which included lower revenues and significantly more expenditures. She said that Council approval of the action item, in the regular Council meeting later in the evening, would bring about improvement in the fund. G.. Electric Fund Projected YE per PreliminaryActual Budgetasof as of July26,2016 Sept. 30,2016 $Variance %Variance Revenues: Operating $65,910,665• $65,373,714 ($5361951) ( AKI Non -Operating $1,500,000 $1,761,132 $261,132 17.4% Expenses: Operating $55,772,2461 $60,769,589 ($4,996,743) (9.0%) Non -Operating $12,370,307 $12,087,657 $282,650 1.9% FundBolanae $12,683,353` $7,693,441 ($4,989,912) (39.3%) •Reflects Council'sAntiopaled Approval of Budget Amendment 12-13-2016. Jim Briggs, the City's General Manager of Utilities, described the variances in the revenues and expenditures of the electric fund and provided reasons for the variances. • Mild summer temperatures • August(September significant weather impacts • Increase in Capital Improvement Programs due to growth Briggs explained the impact and cause and effect of the weather. He explained that May through August of 2016 was 5% below budget and that during FY2016 the City Received 19.1 more inches of rainfall than normal. GrOROrT&N FY2016 — Cause and Effect - Weather • Mild, Wet Late -Summer (standard weather fluctuation) — Lower retail customer demand Lower revenue -j But also Excess supply — Entire Wholesale Market has excess supply • Market price depressed • Wholesale Clearing Price below Purchase Price — -) Power Purchase loss from clearing excess supply -> Used Cash Reserves (il (ba'•I lir,:, 2016 May -Aug averaged 5° below budget FY2016 was 19.1" above normal rainfall Briggs went on to speak on electric fund solutions for both FY2016 and FY2017. Gi nr.Ul Electric Fund • FY 2016 Solutions — Adjust allocations between the Electric and Water Funds to appropriately recognize shared costs • Billing Softvrare Project (CIS) • Infrastructure Control Operations — Debt fund the CIS project in the Electric Fund — With adjustments, fund will meet contingency requirements • FY 2017 Solutions — Reduce cash funding and increase debt funding for planned capital projects — Recognize Payment from NRG purchase of Buckthorn Project (may possibly be recognized in FY16) Briggs spoke on the Transmission Cost of Service (TCOS) and Rate Impact for FY2017 Transmission Cost of Service (TCOS) Rate Impact — FY 17 • ERCOT/PUC Approved Statewide Rate Increase • Paid to Statewide Transmission Companies through Statewide (ERCOT) Rate Increase • Local Wires Companies (GUS, ONCOR, PEC) will incur the cost increases equitably • City Ordinance provides for the administrative application of the increase to rates • Customers notified of increase to TCOS by State and the rate impact of about $2.00 per month to bills • Estimates of increase for 2017 to be $879,700 for partial year starting with consumption in January 2017 • Total TCOS increases impact to over $1,000,000 annually Briggs said the solution to the electric fund moving forward would be to monitor purchased power costs closely, with monthly reporting at the financial close and improving the cash position of the fund to improve buffering weather fluctuations. He explained this would include balancing the cash position to the market risk and forecasting by the forward curve. Briggs said that natural gas is higher than a year ago, as is energy costs in general. He said this puts the City at less risk. Briggs noted that the impact to all utilities is in the summer months and weather can make a rapid change in all utilities. He explained that normal summer weather conditions bring more revenue. City Manager, David Morgan, spoke on a 3 year outlook of the fund that would be given to the Council. He described the budget amendment and rate stabilization and noted that it will be in a much stronger position within the year. Morgan said the City will monitor this closely and communicate with Council throughout the process. Wallace provided summarization slides on each of the funds but said she would skip ahead to the funds that need action taken at that evening's regular City Council meeting, which included the Debt Service Fund, the Tourism Fund, the Self -Insurance Fund, the Library Restricted Special Revenue Fund and the Electric and Water Funds. Summary • Debt Service: — The Debt Service Fund reflectsthe refunding (refinancing) of $7.9M Contractual Obligations for 2006 and 2007 for vehicles and equipment from various City departments. — The refunding was approved by Council in spring of 2016 and resulted in $861,000 savings on interest rates. • Tourism Fund: —The Tourism Fund reflects increases in both revenue ($40K) and expenditures ($50K) for Poppy Festival activities and CVB operations activities. Summary • Self -Insurance Fund: Groraorioicn II%A. — The Self -Insurance Fund is amended by ($500K) in revenue and ($34K) in expenditures to reflect plan contributions and medical claims that were higher than budgeted. Library Restricted: — The Library Special Revenue Fund is amended to recognize additional donation revenue ($16K) and appropriate additional Library related expenditures ($15K). Summary • Electric and Water Funds: — The Electric and Water Funds are adjusted so that the Water Fund contributes toward half of the costs of the Customer Information System (CIS) project, and contributes toward Control Center, Meter Services and SCADAdepartment costs based on meter allocation. — This amendment is needed to improve cash flow in the Electric Fund as a result of a current year loss on Purchased Powercosts. • This budget amendment decreases the CIS budget in the Electric Fund by 52.2M and increases it in the Water Fund by the same amount. • This amendment also transfers 5711K out of the Water Fund to the Electric Fund for shared Control Center Costs. — Since Electric and Water services benefit from both the Customer Information Systemand the Control Center, the funds will share costs In future fiscal years. Wallace explained that the City has more water customers than electric customers. She noted that both water and electric relate and the proposed amendment would improve the revenues by splitting shared projects. Wallace spoke on the Next Steps and explained that the bond reimbursement resolution would also be on the evening's agenda for Council approval. • Budget Amendments — FY2016 & FY2017 — December 13, 2016 and January 10, 2016 • CIP Roll Forward — January 24, 2016 • Bond Reimbursement Resolution — December 13, 2016 • External Audit—Through the Winter • Comprehensive Annual Financial Report— March 2017 Wallace explained that, overall, the City is in good financial condition. She said improvements were expected at the airport and deficits were expected in the EMS Fund. Wallace said the electric fund situation was not expected, but the solutions are excellent Wallace said the City can be confident that the bond rating companies will look favorably to the changes to the funds. Mayor Ross asked about the Self Insurance Fund. Wallace said the fund is in good shape and there is no reason for concern at this time. She said the revenue of the fund is very stable. Wallace said the two reserve funds, set up for that fund, are fully funded. Ross cautioned that some years can have more experiences than others. Wallace said that there will be no increase in health premiums to the City or City employees this year. Hesser asked if an adjustment in reserves would be made because of the changes in the Self Insurance Fund. Wallace said this was considered but the amounts did not warrant a recalculation. B. Review of the Fiscal and Budgetary Policy to be used in preparing the fiscal year 2018 annual budget and to guide financial operations during fiscal year 2017 — Leigh Wallace, Finance Director Leigh Wallace, Finance Director, provided the presentation on the fiscal and budgetary policy. She began the presentation with a slide depicting the Purpose. Purpose • Fiscal and Budgetary Policies guide: • Budget development and monitoring process • Debt sale • Accountingand audit procedures • Reviewed annually by GGAF and City Council • Last updated April 2016 • Significant overhaul in structure of document • Added Economic Uncertainty Reserve • Added Self -Insurance Reserves • Changed Employee Compensation program • Enhanced requirements for quarterly financial reporting Wallace spoke on some administrative changes including clarifying wording and formatting, removing old language that no longer applies, and updating and consolidating notations of compliance and amounts for the FY2017 adopted budget. Wallace described the substantive changes to the fiscal policy. Substantive Changes • Expenditure Management, Personnel Costs (page 9) • Vacancy Factor— expanded policy to apply to all major funds with personnel costs greater than $4 million • General Fund, Joint Services, Water, Electric • Benefit Payout Reserve — specifically applies to General Fund and Joint Services Fund • Staffing & Compensation, Self -Insurance (page 14) • Stabilize fund revenue and department expenditures by adding policy to return any budgeted and unused health insurance contributions to the fund at the end of the fiscal year Substantive Changes • Expenditure Management, Retirement Benefits (page 12) • Provide more flexibility in option to fund the unfunded pension liability • Current language: One-time payment approved no later than December • Proposed language: Higher contribution rate approved during budget process Councilmember Brainard commended staff for the changes and improvements. He said there have been very positive developments. C. Review of the City's Investment Policy and discussion of recommended changes for 2017 — Leigh Wallace, Finance Director Leigh Wallace, Finance Director, explained the City's investment policy and led a discussion and review of the recommended changes for 2017. She began the presentation on the investment policy with a slide showing the purpose. --_ Grin:cimr:n�- Purpose • The Investment Policy sets the objectives and rules for investing the City's available cash and reserves • The Policy follows all of the rules in the Public Funds Investment Act and is recommended by the Investment Advisors • Council required to review the policy annually • Last reviewed April 2016 • Updated training requirementsof investment officers • Updated list of approved broker/dealers Wallace spoke on the administrative changes — documenting what is already being done, in practice. • Officially document investment procedures and internal controls • Explicitly state all transactions will be through a competitive process with a minimum of 3 bids • Align policy language more closely with the Public Funds Investment Act o Training requirement for Investment Officers o All investments must be of highest quality o City Council approves the list of brokers/dealers Wallace described the substantive changes. now rMVa• a Substantive Changes • Resolve conflicting language on maximum length of investments • operating funds, contingency reserves, bond proceeds • Single maturity may not exceed 3 years • Changes to approved list of Broker/Dealers • Add Hilltop Securities • Add MultiBank Securities • Add Wells Fargo Securities • Add FTN Financial Capital Markets • Remove Coastal Securities • Remove 1PMorganChase Securities • Remove UBS Paine Webber Wallace wanted to clarify that Wells Fargo securities is not the same as Wells Fargo Bank. Wallace announced that Susan Anderson from the investment firm was present if there were questions. Mayor Ross thanked Wallace for a job well done. D. Discussion and possible direction on Emergency Management planning process, grant(s), and Office of Emergency Management (OEM) development — Chad Berg, Emergency Management Coordinator Chad Berg, the City's Emergency Management Coordinator, provided a presentation for discussion on the possible direction and planning process for the Office of Emergency Management development. Berg spoke on where the City is with emergency management and where it will be going. He explained that the presentation has a lot of information, but he will summarize for the purpose of today's workshop meeting. Berg spoke on the mission and vision of the program and the importance of insuring appropriate supplies and relationships. Vision Building a safer future through effective partnerships of local government, emergency services, private sector, and volunteer agencies and the citizens of Georgetown to save lives, protect property and reduce the effects of disasters through preparedness, prevention, planning, response, and recovery activities. Mission The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) coordinates the Georgetown emergency management program to prepare, prevent, plan, respond and recover from ail -hazard events. The OEM develops, maintains and Implements the ability to direct, control, manage and coordinate emergency operations in cooperation with local, State and Federal governmental and private sector agencies. Berg explained that the terminology of emergency management is sometimes blurred. He said emergencies and disasters are two different things. He said that GUS might be working on water main breaks, which could expand to a lot of different partners. Berg explained that disasters that cannot be handled internally, need to reach out regionally, statewide or even nationally. Terminology • Hazard -A dangerous event or circumstance that has the potential to lead to an emergency or disaster. • Emergency- A dangerous event that normally can be managed at the local level. • Disaster -A dangerous event that causes significant human and economic loss and demands a crisis response beyond the scope of local and state resources. • Emergency Management -Organized analysis, planning, decision- making, and assignmentof available resources to mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from the effects of all hazards. Berg provided slides of the Emergency Management Cycle and explained the Government Code 418 The Emergency Management Cycle 0 OIW�;" Government Code 418 kid) This Government Code assigns responsibility for dealing with disasters to the Mayor for the local jurisdiction The Mayor of a local government has the responsibility for directing emergency management programs in their jurisdictions through coordination with subject matter experts. Mayor can declare a local state of emergency or disaster Expected to utilize jurisdictional resources first, but then once local resources are exhausted can request state assistance May order the evacuation of all or part of the population from an area under their authority May limit egress back to the disaster area Berg explained that the Mayor has the authority to make many declarations in disasters and this is important to emergency management as a whole. Berg went on to describe the Local Government Responsibilities and the importance of public education. Berg explained that the public education portion of the emergency management plan will be pushed out soon. Local Government Responsibiliti Local governments are responsible for their emergency management programs, to include: • Conduct comprehensive emergency planning • Trainingemergency responders, city staff and city officials • Conducting drills &eterclses • Providing emergency facilities&equipment, with good communications& power; establishing EOC facilities • Developingmutual aid agreements • Responding to emergencies • Providing emergency public education Berg provided slides on the Current Emergency Management Work Plan Current Emergency Management Work Plan • Collaboration Among Entities , t • Partnerwith State,Rea'ronal, County, Local Governments • Create Public/ Private Partnerships •' , • cnamtmr el cmnmorca TSun CuvTccas -• • Work with Civic GroupsChurches, Non -Profits • eolhtwmelan xan mo Svi OYFm•rga¢vatamg•m•m eonmwe • Hazard VulnerabilityAnalysls for the City of Georgetown • Review and Revise the Approved HarardMitigalionAction Plan • Local Emergency Operations Plan • Review and Revise Existinglimergency Operations Plan • Check federal and Slate Compliance ••.0 • DevelopRegionaland CountyCoordnation • Ensure local validity <<. • Develop Standard Operations for Emergency Operations Center • Adopted ThrovghovtwiilliamsonCounty, Current Emergency Management Work Plan • Emergency Public Educationlarogram • Cowdinatewitb Natiorui ReadygavProgfam • DevelopCommunity Specific Program • Implement Throughouteommunity • Community Preparedness Programs WafnCemralTexas.org • OutdoorEmergencyWaining5iren System Ready. Community WamCenbJalTexao.org s' • Smart911 • Pul"POint BMW • CommunityWildfireProtenion Plan(CWPP) • Hazard Mitigation Programs • Develop 5 year Plan • Emergency Planning �ornv • EmployeeTraining f tOoxS� • Simulated Exerdses Fo oto` �. y7_.?,S<• Berg spoke on the continuity of a business plan in disasters or emergencies. He noted that the City was working with the disaster committee in Sun City. Berg spoke on the FEMA approval of the plan and how it must be a living document with constant updates. He explained that there is a level of planning in place that is required. Berg spoke on the emergency operations facility room and preparing the insurance of functioning together. He spoke on educating the public on sirens and a local program for phone notification. Berg provided a slide on Next Steps Next Steps / January 2017 • City Ordinance for Emergency Management • Ratifythe ordinance toreflecrthe desired progressionsforGeorgetmn Emergency Management Georgetown Emergency Operations Plan (EDP) • Appfoealofthe updated Emergency Operations Plan that meets cur rent standards • Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) • Application tothe Texas Division of Emergency Management forthe EMPG • The purposeofthe Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) Program is to providefederalfunds tostates toassist staw.local, terfitorlal, andtrlbaigmernments in preparing forall hazards. • The EMPG Brill reimburse Emergency Managementexpenses upto Sty* of the totalcost on projects,saladesa dexpenses Berg explained the Emergency Operations Performance Grant, which helps local jurisdictions to establish the office of Emergency Management Standards. A slide on the Texas EMTF was shown next Texas EMTF Requesting involvement in the Emergency Medical Task Force (EMTF) Program through a Memorandum of Understanding with the State of Texas • The Teus Eme,eencyMedlKdl Task Force(T%EMTf)is a State and Federally ITxDSIIS, ASPA)funded program virth the mission of aeaing Statewleplvyahfe mm"I toann, ieggmaliz r. for raPkt mobilization and readiness. • Provides a network of support for the greater Georgetown area • Provides an advanced level of training to staff concerning disaster operations • Equips the City of Georgetown with emergency response assets C 6 Berg explained the Memorandum of Understanding with the State of Texas and said it will be brought to the Council next month. A Summary was provided. Summary • The Mayor of a local government has the responsibility for directing emergency management programs in their jurisdictions. An effective local emergency management program addresses mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery • Preparedness is vital to a successful emergency management program • Georgetown OEM actions for FY17 include: • Collaboration among the public sector, private sector and civic organizations • Emergency Planning • Training/ educatingthe employees and citizens • Conducting emergency exercises • Development of a Comprehensive Program Councilmember Jonrowe thanked Berg for the presentation and asked if training programs are available for Councilmembers. Berg said there is a 4 hour class for Government Elected Officials that he will be happy to arrange. E. Presentation and discussion regarding Georgetown Police Department's CommUNITY Program —Wayne Nero, Police Chief Chief Nero provided a presentation of the Georgetown Police Department's Community Program. He explained that this is anew initiative that the Police Department is working on. Nero said the framework of the program is being established right now and the Police Department will be working with various community figures. Nero went on to explain the concept of the program. He explained that the Police Department needs to play a larger role in the community to show good things happen, instead of mostly bad. The program is intended to bring groups in the community closer to the Police Department. Nero said it is important to tell the story of the good things they do and actually brand community engagement. Chief Nero provided slides on the Program Purpose and showed graphs depicting the issue of Police and Public Trust. Purpose • Issue of Police & Public Trust 1M ryeWn.. � n. TI --1 luJirt.l.4w .I idauno,u.. Q �. Purpose • Issue of Police & Public Trust AmericanaRespectfor Pdice in 7hcirArcas.196.5-1016 n.... nw<h pleat &J. •onm w IuNh' aut'! � tARrcat drat � ti6nmr 1'.Ilo Nl7an?' 76 m M S6 61 33 Y9 31 x: SS 17 7 n '6.i 164 '71 '-1 ._ '13 '46 '49 ''91 '9.7 '94 '01 'al 'n7 'lo '13 '16 lit Be tho Standard._Refuse Mediocrity Purpose • Issue of Police & Public Trust ,Unericr Respcctfnr Pdice in 7beir,lrcm. by Ram -30 Z6 n.,�nutdln•pntJop.nbarlollhrlvAio-mx.urn.--agn-atJral..ontr.+rlulJhmty? '1'.:1 Pmrt drat - � tptt6a TI \nnrhdn 40 61 69 I6 _--_ 53 61 1.1 'n1 'nt '03 'MI '0.7, '06 '07 'n4 '09 '10 'u '12 '13 '14 'li '16 t`�i1VJ�\r/�fifa\r/�t� fi Gl fi fa fi fi fa G1ow14wn To Be the Standacd...Refuse Mediocrity IIM. li7C Nero spoke on community engagement and explained that it is at the highest levels of trust in 16 years. He explained that pro -active relationships are important. He said a bad situation cannot be the only interaction a community member has with officers. Nero said the intent is to strategically and intentionally interact positively with the community. Nero described seven community stakeholder groups and spoke on the vision and mission of the program and the engagement strategy. Seven CommUNITY Stakeholder Groups Youth QWW� Vision & Mission • One Extraordinary Comm UNITY • (FOCUS) Forge strong relationships across various stakeholder groups that provide Opportunities for Constructive dialogue (problem solving), which through mutual trust and understanding enables UNITY that is Sustainable. etmallo..x To Be the Standard... Refuse Mediocrity Engagement Strategy Problom Meaningful Solvin6 Dialogue Growm.e To f;e the 5tan.iaeci_.Refuse Mediocrity Chief Nero discussed the 5 Programmatic Phases. He said the leaders of various groups of stakeholders will be identified and new relationships will be created. 1. Assess & Inventory Relationships 2. Establish New Relationships 3. Seek Engagement Opportunities 4. Develop Programmatic Opportunities S. Develop Relational Network for Collaborative Problem Solving & Interaction Chief Nero explained that the program will start at the first of January and begin with pastors of church groups who will be brought together for lunch and general information. Councilmember Jonrowe said she is very excited about this program. She explained that it can be a hard topic to talk about because it is emotional. Jonrowe said that relationships are key. She asked Nero if any part of the program would be brought back to Council for executive action. Nero explained that the program will be facilitated through the Police Department. Jonrowe asked if the Council would be updated regularly on the program. Nero confirmed and said he will be happy to bring updates as often as Council would like. Nero explained that the absence of relationships can be problematic. The Chief explained that the strongest leaders become an advisory board for him. He explained that these leaders can spread the word and are great support in a crises. He explained the importance of trust and faith in the Police Department Jonrowe asked if Council attendance would be helpful with community meetings. Nero said it would be helpful in some meetings and events and would add to the legitimacy of the program. Councilmember Fought said Council participation is important He explained that, in the case of disasters, there is value in the community knowing these people. Councilmembers would value training for disasters. Fought spoke on the power of the Mayor and said he would like to know more. Nero said Chad Berg, the Emergency Management Coordinator will besetting up the trainings. Councilmember Gonzalez congratulated Chief Nero and spoke on the importance of doing this program when not in crises. He spoke of the importance of the rank and file being involved in the program. Nero spoke on the importance of the feedback from the community to the Police Department. Councilmember Hesser spoke on the importance of field staff involvement. Mayor Ross asked how to measure success of this program. Nero said it would be difficult because it is not quantitative, but perhaps through a survey. Nero said the measurement is the trust of the public. Ross said if you cannot measure it, you cannot manage it and added that surveys are valuable. Mayor Ross recessed the meeting to Executive Session under Section 551.071, and Section 551.074 at 5:00 PM. Executive Session In compliance with the Open Meetings Act, Chapter 551, Government Code, Vernon's Texas Codes, Annotated, the items listed below will be discussed in closed session and are subject to action in the regular session. Sec. 557.071: Consultation with Attorney - Advice from attorney about pending or contemplated litigation and other matters on which the attorney has a duty to advise the City Council, including agenda items - TCS Industrial District Agreement - GTU-Jet Lease Agreement Sec. 551.074: Personnel Matters - City Manager, City Attorney, City Secretary and Municipal Judge: Consideration of the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, discipline, or dismissal Adjournment Mayor Ross adjourned the meeting at 6:00 PM to begin the Regular City Council Meeting. Approved by the Georgetown City Council on �' D Date I A --w Dale Ross, Mayor