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MIN 10.25.2016 CC-WMinutes of a Meeting of the Governing Body of the City of Georgetown, Texas Tuesday, October 25, 2016 The Georgetown City Council will meet on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 at 3:00 PM at the Council Chambers, at 101 E. 7th St., Georgetown, Texas The city of Georgetown is committed to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you require assistance in participating at a public meeting due to a disability, as defined under the ADA, reasonable assistance, adaptations, or accommodations will be provided upon request. Please contact the City Secretary's Office, at least four (4) days prior to the scheduled meeting date, at (512) 930-3652 or City Hall at 113 East 8" Street for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. Mayor Ross called the meeting to order at 3:00 PM. All Councilmembers were in attendance, with the exception of Councilmember Keith Brainard, District 2, Councilmember Tommy Gonzalez, District 7 and Councilmember Ty Gipson, District 5. Councilmember Gonzalez arrived at 3:35 PM. Policy Development/Review Workshop — Call to order at 3:00 PM A. Presentation and discussion regarding proposed updates to the Main Street Fagade & Sign Grant Program and addressing additional questions — Shelly Hargrove, Main Street Manager and Taylor Kidd, Chair of the Main Street Advisory Board Shelly Hargrove began the discussion regarding proposed updates to the Main Street Fagade & Sign Grant program. She recognized the Main Street Advisory Board and said that she would begin the presentation followed by the Main Street Advisory Board Chair, Taylor Kidd. Hargrove said that discussion goals would include a review of the current and proposed Main Street Fagade and Grant Program and follow-up from the September 27 workshop and Council direction from that meeting. Hargrove said that Taylor Kidd would present the Main Street Advisory Board's recommended purpose for the grant program. She explained that Fire Chief, John Sullivan would provide a map of downtown fire suppression locations. Hargrove said the distribution of information on the grant program would be reviewed and direction from the City Council would be requested. Hargrove displayed the Main Street Fagade and Sign Grant Program chart showing the comparison of the Taylor Kidd, Chair of the Main Street Advisory Board, spoke on the Grant Program's Purpose Statement Georgetown Main Street Program's Fagade and Sign Grant Program provides resources which preserve, protect and enhance commercial property in the Downtown Overlay District. Kidd explained that this is key to keeping Georgetown the Most Beautiful Downtown and is a testament to the City Council's commitment. He explained that staff was unable to find an historical statement of purpose and that the current board drafted and adopted the current purpose statement He said the newly approved purpose statement serves as a guiding principal for the program. Kidd explained that the program invests in small business and keeps the City's intent for the Most Beautiful Downtown and to be an attractive destination location. Councilmember Fought asked about the facade and sign program. He said he believes that the original intention was to beautify the outside of buildings, and fire prevention is an inside expense. Fought said assisting with fire prevention expense is getting too close to doing what should be done by the property owner. He explained that if the City were to open the door to fix someone's inside and not do the same for others, it becomes unfair. Fought said he wants the grant funding to stick to the outside of a structure. Fought mentioned that fire prevention should be supported by a different program, not the sign facade program. Taylor Kidd said this program has worked on inside changes for many years. Kidd said the fund works to protect the downtown overlay district both structurally and with safety concerns. Fought said he does agree with funding for accessibility. Kidd displayed and discussed the grant program revenue vs. expenses for 2012 through 2016. He explained that adding fire suppression allows the board to spend the money to show the impact of the fund. Kidd said that the board had unanimously approved the proposed changes. Hargrove spoke on the need to protect the downtown overlay district and showed fire suppression locations in Downtown. Hargrove noted that fire suppression is intended to protect the investment downtown. She provided pictures of fires caused by faulty old electrical wiring. Hargrove spoke next on the distribution of the grant program. She passed out a pamphlet that is used as a guide for business owners to educate them on how to apply for a grant through the program. Hargrove explained the Guide for New Downtown Business Owners and said it is distributed at the following places. • Quarterly Breakfast Bites and Downtown Low Down Meetings • Downtown Block Captains through the EV Committee • Planning and Permitting Departments • Chamber of Commerce and the Visitors Center • Local Sign Companies • Annual Georgetown Swirl event and website • Online version on mainstreet.georgetown.org Hargrove explained the direction she is seeking from the City Council. • Consider increasing the maximum facade matching grant amount from $10,000 to $20,000 • Consider adding fire sprinkler and suppression systems and the removal of barriers to public accessibility to the eligible grant work Councilmember Fought spoke on the method of grant acceptance and said he is not in favor of the first come first serve method. Hargrove said it was set up as a sense of urgency by first come first serve. She explained that she had sent an email request to other main street programs in Texas and found that all use the first come first serve method. Hargrove said new business is always coming and going and staff and the board want to respond in a quick manner. They would not be able to provide swift assistance if the request had to be tabled to wait for other requests. Hargrove said she currently has 4 grant applications on her desk. She said most people would not be able to fit their project within set deadlines. City Manager, David Morgan, reminded the Council that minimum application standards must be met before grant consideration. He explained that in the last several years there has been more funding than requests and all requests have met the standards. He noted that these are fund raising funds that are available. Fought said he could support the method as long as there remains more funds than requests but would want to rethink the method if that stops being the case. Mayor Ross asked if all restaurants are required to have fire suppression. Hargrove confirmed. Hargrove said she was hoping all businesses would install fire suppression in'order to protect all of downtown. Hesser asked about the original objective and said it seems as if the program has been a fly by the seat of your pants situation. Hargrove said there has been a mission statement that has been followed even though the purpose statement is new. Hesser said he is against paying for fire suppression because the owner should want to follow code. Hargrove explained that only restaurants are required to have fire suppression. She said it has been cost prohibitive for most of the business owners downtown. She explained that the pressed metal ceilings make it more costly. Hesser said he does not want to expand the program to fire suppression. Jonrowe thanked Hargrove for the presentation. She said staff is the most in touch with business owners and Council does not need to manage this program. Jonrowe said the Main Street Advisory Board has raised a lot of money and knows what improvements are needed. She added that she supports the 50/50 match up to the maximum. Councilmember Eby said she agrees with Jonrowe. She said she felt that there had been unfair characterizations made from the dais. Eby said flying by the seat of your pants was unfair when so much has been raised and safety of the downtown is the discussion. Eby suggested changing the name of the program to better fit what needs to be done. Hesser said he would like to discontinue the City's $15,000.00 contribution to the program and allow the Main Street Advisory Board to operate any way they wish. Mayor Ross said the Council seems to be split and asked that an action item for a vote be placed on the next practical meeting agenda. B. Update on Unified Development Code amendment process and presentation of recommendations from the Unified Development Code Advisory Committee — Sofia Nelson, Planning Director Sofia Nelson, the Planning Director, provided the presentation on the proposed updates for the Unified Development Code amendment process. She explained that transportation will be discussed at the next meeting. Nelson described the project team and provided a process recap. She explained that she would be presenting the recommendations from the Unified Development Code Advisory Committee for infrastructure and public improvements and development applications. Nelson displayed a requested feedback sheet and explained that she would request Council direction on Proceed as Proceed with recommended recommended by UDCAC changes Requestfor Voluntary annexation with utility extension Codification of infrastructure assignment Nelson explained that the project has been the work of many and congratulated the entire team and noted the importance of each individual's contribution. Nelson spoke on the board's review of Chapter 13, Infrastructure & Public Improvement. She said they reviewed provisions related to water and wastewater improvements and extension requirements, a Priority Number 1. Nelson said Part 1 sections reviewed included codification of current practice for requesting voluntary annexation and the codification of when infrastructure should be underground. Nelson explained the codification of current practice for requesting voluntary annexation. • Properties in the ETJ that desire or require fire flow service shall first submit a petition for voluntary annexation. • Properties in the ETJ that desire or require wastewater service shall first submit a petition for voluntary annexation Councilmember Jonrowe asked about the Chisholm Trail annexation. Nelson said water only is required. Wesley Wright, Systems Engineering Director, explained that areas outside of ETJ are served on the Western District and their fire protection is provided by providers other than the City of Georgetown. He explained that services to provide water are negotiated and the UDC does not apply. Nelson spoke on the codification of underground electric utility assignment policy. She explained that utilities are required to be underground except for alley ways. She explained that transformers must be behind main buildings and behind the street yard. Fought said he likes the direction the City is going. He asked who takes care of supplying the correct fire flow and who pays, when a request for fire flow is made. Wesley Wright said this takes place at the development stage and a City Engineer deciphers the needed improvements. If the City is able to supply services, as when services are already intended in the area, the City will agree, without cost to the developer. Wright explained that if the City would not be supplying services in that area anyway, then the cost is to the developer. If infrastructure is not a priority to the City, it will need to be a negotiation, explained Wright. Mayor Ross asked about voluntary annexation and utilities provided. Nelson elaborated. She then asked for direction from Council. Ross asked Nelson to continue on with the presentation and receive Council direction at the end. Ross then asked Nelson to confirm that most utilities are being moved underground. Nelson confirmed. Jonrowe asked about existing or new design in the alley and asked for the reasoning behind it Nelson said it is for aesthetics. She said there is no current requirement for underground utilities and that it is just a policy. Nelson said itis much more expensive to go underground. She explained that alleys can cost less for the developer. Nelson said the option is available. Ross asked if Council wanted underground utilities in all cases or if they wanted options. Hesser asked who owns the alley. Nelson said the home owners association, in most cases. Eby said she would support options offered. The other councilmembers agreed. Nelson spoke on Part 2 Sections to be reviewed. • Review of Development Application Order • Establishing requirement for Development Plat Review of plat extensions • Establishing a subdivision variance process is related to the Nelson provided images for development plats and plat extensions. She explained to Council that the recommendations would be to require a development plat but that the UDC Committee is still working on this and additional conversations will be needed. Hesser asked if there could be two tracts by two different developers. Nelson said this would be an illegal subdivision and they could do this only for their own tract. Nelson explained that currently a developer can own a property for two years before applying for a two year extension before platting, allowing, essentially, 4 years. The UDC would propose that an extension is for 6 months instead of two years, limiting the non- development to 2.5 years instead of 4. Fought asked about impact fees. Nelson said currently impact fees are established at the preliminary plat stage and 4 years could go by before submitting a final plat. This amendment would only allow 2.5 years. Fought said he liked the idea. ages would allow Mayor Ross asked about the new 2.5 years. Nelson said it would be helpful because it would require the development to be a true development and would promote the need to move to final platting. She said it would also create the need to access new impact fees. Ross asked Nelson if the City received any feedback from developers on this. Nelson said it had been reviewed by the Planning & Zoning Commission, which has members who are developers. Nelson said it would also be brought to the public. C. Discussion on the Overall Transportation Plan (OTP) Amendment for a proposed collector located West of I- 35 and East of Airport Road — Sofia Nelson, Planning Director Sofia Nelson, the Planning Director, explained the amendment for a proposed collector located west of 135 and east of Airport Road. She said she would provide an overview of the Overall Transportation Plan (OTP) Map, review the transportation connectivity on the northern end of the City, focus on the specific section of the OTP west of 135 and east of Airport Road and request Council direction to proceed with the OTP map amendment process. Nelson explained that the proposed amendment would remove a segment of road, as the development will not be needing it for the industrial development in the area. Nelson explained the direction she would need from Council. • Option 1 — Proceed as presented • Option 2 — Do not proceed with the amendment • Option 3 — Proceed with an alternative amendment Nelson said the amendment is asking to remove the section from the map. She explained that this would still have public hearings and be brought back to Council at each level. Fought asked if this is in line with the proposals floating through the economic development community. City Manager Morgan said this is very much in line with considerations. D. Presentation and discussion regarding the proposed FY2016 budget amendment and Strength of Force for the Fire Department— Leigh Wallace, Finance Director and John Sullivan, Fire Chief Leigh Wallace, the Finance Director, spoke on the proposed budget amendment for the Fire Department. She explained that the requested amendment to the general fund for the Fire Department would be on the legislative agenda at the regular meeting later that evening. Wallace showed the FY2016 Fire Department's approved budget ($11.3M), July projection ($11.6M), and preliminary year-end projection ($11.8M). She explained that this is primarily due to overtime to backfill vacant seats. Secondarily it is a result of firefighter equipment and supplies, explained Wallace. Wallace described the budget amendment She noted that there would be no change in the fund balance and no impact to the Council Discretionary Fund. She noted that there is even the possibility of more in the fund balance due to savings in the general fund from other departments. Wallace explained that there was a $500,000.00 overage in the fire budget from the summer projection, mostly from unforeseen overtime paid. .v GfORG(TO\VAS FY 2016 Budget Amendment • General Fund Changes — Recognize sales tax revenue $525,637 —Appropriate Fire expenditures $525,637 — Net change in Fund balance $0 • Council Discretionary Fund — no impact Councilmember Gonzalez asked if the shortage figure had considered the vacant position salaries. Wallace confirmed. Fire Chief, John Sullivan, spoke on the transition into monitoring the situation and preparing for FY2017. He noted that costs are dynamic and ever changing and spoke on two overtime review focus areas. • Turnover, open positions and hiring timeline • Vacation, sick, training and special projects Chief Sullivan spoke on the overtime environment and the options for controlling the costs in 2017. Sullivan explained that the transition and monitoring for FY2017 recommends the hiring of 3 new firefighters to cover one float per shift and explained a float position per shift is synonymous with overtime. Sullivan discussed the challenges in the Fire Department next: • Increased call activity = staffing • Delays in onboarding new positions • FMIA and injury leaves • Vacancy catch-up • Attrition rate higher than historical reference Sullivan described an increased demand for service and provided a chart depicting the increases. GFoecrii��, ni Increased Demand for Service eXo 2000 7000 60"00 5000 4000 3000 2700 Iwo 0 FY14 FY15 FY16 Sullivan explained that the EMS was geared up for the demand and response times have gone down. He provided vacancy examples: • OT Control Equations 0.5 x Seat Position —28 Seats x 0.5 =14 OT Control Positions and there are 4.7 OT Control Positions per day • Vacation Leave = 4 slots per day • Sick Leave = 1 slot per day • FMLA • Injuries • Training Sullivan spoke on the minimum staff required for emergencies and the extra staff needed for vacancies, FMLA, sickness, etc. He provided images of 96 authorized operation positions for FY16 and the tenure within the Fire Department. After this, images were shown of the impact to FY 2017 and the effect of 102 authorized operation positions in FY17. Sullivan explained the vacancy issues and said there were still vacancies in the 4 float positions, with 5 vacancies currently in play. GFog,! I Io" 96* Authorized Operation Positions— FY16 �2n151I6 )C .II.Vllepl - Piv p6.� UM 28 gv omm 400% -Mi O N_ 2n 15/16 NP10pliant -All Shnt• I W84+'? ",+.,, s GFor.:arrn•;nom FY 2016 Authorized Operation Positions Oct 96 89 -1 7 Nov 96 88 -1 8 Dec 96 88 8 Jan 96 87 -1 9 Feb 96 91 -1 5 5 Mar 96 90 -1 6 Apr 96 90 6 May 96 94 4 2 Jun 96 93 -1 3 Jul 96 93 3 Aug 96 93 3 Sep 96 90 -3 6 _ GIORGETOIYN�- 11�� Tenure Within Georgetown Fire/Medical ■ > 3yr ®< 3yr GfORCfTO\VNO Tn.is 102* Authorized Operation Positions — FY17 44Z;30 + 2016/11 D-plopnent -All Sh A; y T- Jm 4m M AM FY 2017 Authorized Operations Positions Oct 102 97 -1 8 5 7 Nov 102 97 5 a Dec 102 97 5 a Jan 102 97 5 9 Feb 102 101 -1 5 1 5 Mar 102 6 Apr 102 6 May 102 2 Jun 102 3 Jul 102 3 Aug 102 3 Sep 102 6 There were some technical difficulties with the presentation at this time in the meeting. Mayor Ross asked that the next presentation begin and then the meeting would come back to this presentation after the technical difficulties were resolved. This presentation resumed at 4:35 PM. Sullivan noted that the yellow ambulance images depict an ambulance that was not able to be staffed. (Shown in the 96 Operating Positions Chart for FY16). He said that there are not enough positions filled to control the overtime. Sullivan spoke on the tenure in the Georgetown Fire Department. He explained that 40% of the staff has less than 3 years of experience and there is a need to entice or recruit from other departments. Chief Sullivan provided a chart on the hiring process and explained the differences in hiring from a transitional academy and from a green academy. He noted how the best scenario still takes 6 months. Grol:c.FT6ivN� ".� Hiring Process • Transitional Academy vlri"en Polygraph lob Offer/Notice Anplicalinn Physical Chief Interview Fire Academy J 9M CPAT Orientation Interview 6M Cnai Orientation I interAew Conditional EMS Academy Backgrounds Psych Screen FTO Medical • Green Academy Written Polygraph Job Offer Notice Application Physical Chief Interview Fire Academy r r J 9M CPAT Orientation Interview Conditional EMS Academy Backgrounds Psych Screen FTC) Medical Sullivan spoke on the Hiring Challenges with the Georgetown Fire Department: • High Standards (> 3 years experience in 911, right attitude, etc.) • Professional Standards • Year-round recruitment efforts • Recent Academies (Feb'15, Dec'15, Sept,'16, Dec'16) • Strong Economy = other job opportunities • Statewide shortage of paramedics = competition Length of on boarding is 3 months vs 6 months Sullivan next provided FY 2017 Options: nZN G rmc,rroi.N� FY 2017 Options • FD averages >5 vacancies per day • Ask = hiring 3 more fire fighters to control OT • Reallocate $200K of OT budget to fund one additional float position on each shift • Additional benefits — Reduce 48-hour work periods caused by 0T — Improve work/life balance of workforce — Improved ability to address vacancies/attrition — Control costs to City Mayor Ross asked the Councilmembers if anyone disagreed with Chief Sullivan's suggestions for improvement. Gonzalez asked if he could spend a day with a firefighter. Sullivan confirmed that he would be happy to make that happen. City Manager, David Morgan, said that if the Council was good with the suggestions presented, then staff would bring an agenda item for a strength of force ordinance for 3 more fire positions to the next meeting. He said that no monies would change since the overtime would go away. Morgan said this would be helpful. E. Presentation and discussion regarding the Retail Strategy and Recruitment Plan — Andreina Davila -Quintero, Project Coordinator, Michaela Dollar, Economic Development Director, and Jason Claunch of Catalyst Commercial Andreina Davila -Quintero, a Project Coordinator for the City, began the presentation and discussion on the City's retail strategy and recruitment plan. She explained that the presentation would include the background, project outcomes, process, findings and recommendations and the implementation and next steps. She spoke on the background of the project and explained that it started with the City Council goal to expand and diversify the commercial tax base. She explained the initiative to create a comprehensive strategy to attract quality retail to the community. Davila -Quintero said that this would include generating a snapshot of existing retail conditions and trends, identifying trade areas, calculating retail sales demand and leakage and identifying top retail sites and centers. Davila -Quintero noted that the retail strategy and recruitment plan would identify targeted retail aimed to sustain and improve retail in Georgetown, in three focus areas: • Attract quality infill development • Recruit anchors for active projects • Identify new growth along emerging nodes Jason Claunch, the consultant from Catalyst Commercial, spoke next on the Comprehensive Assessment He explained that much time will be spent studying each area. Comprehensive Assessment Claunch discussed the process: 1. Market Assessment 2. Trade Area Analysis 3. Market Analysis 4. Competitive Assessment 5. Property Analysis 6. Potential Tenant Identification 7. Merchandising Plan Claunch explained how the Retail Market Assessment is a quick snapshot tool meant to be a marketing piece. He provided the Council with the brochure that had been created for this purpose. Claunch showed a of the Primary Trade Area. He said the area is about 9 miles from 135 and 29, 1 Downtown 2 Wolf Ranch Town Center 3 Wolf Lakes 4 The Rivery i 5 Dr WilliRona 6 Ronaldld Reagan Blvd at Williams Dr & CR 245 -, 7 SH 29/University Ave & SH130 Toll 8 SH 195 & 1-35 9 LonghornJunction ., 10 Lakeway Dr & I-35 Claunch explained how the Retail Market Assessment is a quick snapshot tool meant to be a marketing piece. He provided the Council with the brochure that had been created for this purpose. Claunch showed a of the Primary Trade Area. He said the area is about 9 miles from 135 and 29, Claunch described the meaning and significance of the Primary Trade Area. He noted that this will change across time as the area becomes more competitive and shopping trends change. • Creates a statistical foundation for decision making • Enhances prospective retailers to understand customer shed • Creates ability for existing retailers to understand customer base • Establishes a baseline to measure changes and factors that impact the PTA Claunch described the importance of the market analysis and the stakeholder interview portion. • Commercial balance critical to the fiscal health of Georgetown • Moment in time to activate key assets in Georgetown Bring commercial to the people • Need to understand current capacity for retail Strong potential to activate the "Eastside" and Ronald Reagan corridor and Williams Drive • Anchor buy -in is soft — need to strengthen value proposition Claunch spoke spoke next on the demographic highlights. Demographic Highlights 1 Georgetown has 10% greater Baby Boomers than Texas average and 5% more 75+ 2 Georgetown Household income is greater than both Texas and Austin S, _. Demographics 1 City ownership rates are over 15% greater than the Texas average of 50%. 2 Current population is estimated at 57,958 with a growth rate of almost 40% (in 10 years) 3 Current housing growth rates will increase retail demand by 62,000 square feet per year (about the size of a grocery store) Claunch provided a detailed chart on Retail Leakage. He explained that demands can be oversupplied or undersupplied and it is important to pay attention to opportunities. Retail Leakage ("demand") p Total Danwnd 2016-2046 f4UAPI r mn.nm F m 3 �± IOOAW to Y Y ar Y ab F �' i' ck` ♦Y C �` • A` a� P� as a Y �3'�� yy� �'�•�5� �• ss ted t�y�y��i tt ea° e�+ -ta° cT .F v¢, i' `c ' .os� t `G aa> eF� S`c�' •6° .,� �4 BP •'far Etdkk ryvFa�a �.0 `�.3 Fa.A' S� ar t'��id � y42a�, �b9�` yf ,'a1' GF • Claunch spoke on Competitive Assessment and of existing users in the region. He explained Property Analysis was discussed by Claunch. He explained that property analysis is divided into three categories: Active, Emerging and In -Fill. Market potential & property owner interested in developing in 12-24 months • Longhorn Junction • Wolf Lakes 0 • The Rivery • Lakeway Dr and 1-35 Market potential in the next 3 to 10 years Ronald Reagan Blvd at Williams Drive and CR 245 • SH 29 (University Ave) and SH 130 TW • SH 195 and 1.35 0 Available today • WiNams Drive corridor Dovmtown • Wolf Ranch Town Center Claunch spoke on the Longhorn Junction, Wolf Lakes, and Rivery projects and provided maps and demographics of each. He said he admired the Rivery Project's future plans as a walkable district, a great asset to community. Claunch spoke on the capacities at Lakeway and 135, Ronald Reagan at Williams Drive area, University Avenue at SH130 and the Triangle at 135 and SH195 and provided maps of each. He said that the Ronald Reagan at Williams Drive area has demand coming from Sun City and would be significant to the residential properties there. Claunch said they will continue to monitor this. He explained opportunities at HWY 29 and 1130 and spoke on mixed use possibilities in the triangle. He explained that Wolf Ranch is almost 100% occupied. Claunch noted the in -fill opportunities in the Williams Drive Corridor and the Downtown Overlay District Claunch described Tenant Analysis: • Identified over 40 potential operators that align with Georgetown's characteristics • Categories include but are not limited to: Specialty food stores, Specialty retail stores, Sporting goods, Book stores, Department stores and Full-service restaurants Michaela Dollar, the City's Economic Development Director, spoke on implementation and next steps of the plan. Implementation — Scope of Work: • Align merchandising targets to key properties • Create targeted marketing for each prospect to support locational factors and operational needs • Continuous recruitment • Track sales cycle for prospects evaluating the market • Attend trade shows to champion Georgetown • Ongoing measurement on pipeline, "net need' SF, # of prospects and conversions • Monthly review of all prospects Implementation — Brokers & Developers • Continue developing relationships • Outreach to brokers and developers to share attributes and opportunities within Georgetown • Have information online and readily available (90% is done online before contacting the Economic Development officials) • Customizable reports Implementation — Retailers • Directly target identified retailers with customized packages • Continue to identify retailers • Attend relevant trade shows and recruitment trips • Include retailer in business retention program Councilmember Fought said he had seen this presentation at GEDCO and had taken the tour of Sun City. He suggested that If Council intends to add to the commercial tax base, providing relief to the residents, they will need to put more emphasis on commercial recruitment. He said this will need to be incorporated into the proposed land use and the City will need to stick to it. Fought said that commercial development must be consciously discussed in order to keep commercial development and zoning alive and well. He noted that the triangle is lucrative for growth. Councilmember Gonzalez said future success must be tracked in order to determine if the study was valuable. He said he concurs that the City must stick to the best use of land and needs to be more selective. He explained that the City could run out of good spaces and would not be able to get them back. Gonzalez said he would like to focus on the southeast portion of Georgetown and looks forward to seeing the successes. Mayor Ross complimented the graphics in the brochure and asked about the next steps. Dollar said that she and the consultant have worked well together in the past. She said they would be directly contacting developers and targeting retailers, which has already begun. The ball is rolling said Dollar. City Manager, David Morgan, spoke on the piece that will be sent to targeted retailers. Hd-said that demographics will be shown and primary trade areas explained during the recruitment. He said this will be tracked with an evolving list. Mayor Ross asked how success would be measured. Morgan said they would provide Council with a quarterly review of progress. Mayor Ross recessed the meeting to Executive Session under Section 551.071 and Section 551.074 at 4.45 PM. Executive Session In compliance with the Open Meetings Act, Chapter 551, Government Code, Vernon's Texas Codes, Annotated, the items listed below will be discussed in closed session and are subject to action in the regular session. F. Sec. 551.071: Consultation with Attorney - Advice from allomey about pending or contemplated litigation and other matters on which the attorney has a duty to advise the City Council, including agenda items - Proposed Contract Amendments for the Summit at Rivery Park Sec. 551.074: Personnel Matters - City Manager, City Attorney, City Secretary and Municipal Judge: Consideration of the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, discipline, or dismissal Adjournment Mayor Ross adjourned the meeting to begin the Regular City Council Meeting at 6:00 PM. Approved by the Georgetown City Council on 11 1'%�-)-C)�� Date ( q�' 2, Dale Ross, Mayor