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MIN 10.11.2016 CC-WMinutes of a Meeting of the Governing Body of the City of Georgetown, Texas Tuesday, October 11, 2016 The Georgetown City Council will meet on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 at 3:30 PM at the Council Chambers, at 101 E. 7s' St., Georgetown, Texas The city of Georgetown is committed to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you require assistance in participating at a public meeting due to a disability, as defined under the ADA, reasonable assistance, adaptations, or accommodations will be provided upon request. Please contact the City Secretary's Office, at least four (4) days prior to the scheduled meeting date, at (5 12) 930-3652 or City Hall at 113 East 8ib Street for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. Mayor Ross called the meeting to order at 3:30 PM. All Councilmembers were in attendance, with the exception of Eby, who arrived at 3:35 PM. Policy Development/Review Workshop — Call to order at 3:30 PM A. Presentation of the 2016 Citizen Survey conducted by Texas State University --Paul Diaz, Budget Manager and Dr. Thomas Longoria, Texas State University Paul Diaz, the City's Budget Manager, described the project and introduced Dr. Thomas Longoria from Texas State University who provided a presentation of the results of the City's recent Citizen Survey. Longoria began with the Project Background • City staff reviewed past surveys and selected common survey questions and added questions of interest to City staff and the researchers • City Council reviewed the survey instrument • The project is a collaboration between the City of Georgetown and Texas State faculty and students for educational and research purposes • Survey contained 31 questions — some with prompts organized by categories and other questions with open-ended responses, for a total of 113 items Longoria spoke next on the survey methodology. He explained that the survey was based on a random sample of 2500 housing units from 4500 utility accounts. Longoria said that online and Spanish speaking surveys were made available to attempt to increase the response rate. Longoria noted that the response rate was 20% and 506 surveys were completed, which is in line with typical mail surveys. Longoria said that the survey contained a margin of error of plus or minus 5.5%. He explained that common benchmarks are 80% or higher for high quality and that 60% or lower would be a benchmark that needs improvement. Longoria noted that the interpretation, with the margin of error considered, would be 75% or higher for high quality, which will be shown in green and 65% or lower for needs improvement, which will be shown in red. He said that items that fall between the ranges are shaded in yellow. Longoria said that because the sample is drawn from utility accounts, the characteristics of the respondents should be compared to the household, not an individual. He explained that the US Census collects data for households defined as "an occupied unit" and the person who fills out the survey is defined as the "householder". He said that the characteristics of the respondents of this survey closely match the US Census data in several areas: • 6.3% of households in Georgetown have a Hispanic householder, compared to 6.4% of the sample • The median household income of the sample falls between $50,000 and $75,000 • 25% of the householders are a person living alone according to the US Census, compared to 28% of this sample Longoria provided charts of Hispanic Origin, Renters and Age Comparisons Hisnanic Origin Percent Hispanic Household and Population Comparison n m Y is 0. M+trn Nbpv�k Mr<ent HUWnk cNfMi HYpank Poµlnbn H�uveM1tlA Mpandmh Renters PMCMt RentM Compar 5 to Rmlm (0.hpmdmbl Age of Householder Comparison Age of Householder Comparison 2a M.1 m SO 1p TI I15 191.21 iS bN iS bbl b$ .US Lrnvi •Ilnp[n6nff Longoria explained that there was a big gap and underrepresentation of renters. He explained that extra effort was given to improve response rates among renters. • Some renters do not receive utility bills • Phone calls and emails were sent to the property managers of large complexes • A link to the online survey was also sent • Additional efforts, such as door-to-door visits and extra reminders, might introduce more bias • Efforts to reach college students will be made in a future project due to challenges with university approvals and buy -ins Longoria went on to explain that there was an overrepresentation in age. There were many more older respondents than younger respondents. Again, it is likely that a number of renters and younger groups do not receive utility bills. Longoria said that future surveys will address these issues and get corrected. Longoria provided a chart of the Value of City Services Value of City Services ► Value of city services for the city taxes paid s (78%) generally value from the city as either good or excellent (55% good and 23% excellent) Only 3% rate the value of city services as poor. Value of City Services for Taxes Paid roo 00 ' so ro 60• Godo 12.&m SO FeF 4030•Poo 20 to •♦ o Tv l.dckys w .. Charts displaying the survey results of Living in Georgetown, the Quality of Life Services, Business, Employment and Housing, Mobility, Protective Services, Code and Traffic Enforcement, Streets and Traffic, and Waste Services were provided. loo 90 so ro eo so 40 11 20 20 0 0 Living in Georgetown Living in Georgetown Living in Georgetown 0e011 pt"etotl, Y" PIKe to Otelnxe to �Wlk wMarofWe oeldbbalood cbldien •Poo ratr •6.do,E.-0U t Viae to wka Good or Total Excellent Responses Overall quality of 506 life Place to live 502 Your neighborhood 488 Place to raise 276 children Place to work 74.3 276 Place to retire 474 The downtown 496 Living in Georgetown Living in Georgetown 0e011 pt"etotl, Y" PIKe to Otelnxe to �Wlk wMarofWe oeldbbalood cbldien •Poo ratr •6.do,E.-0U t Viae to wka w.. Quality of Life Services Good or Excellent Total Responses City beautification 474 Downtown events 464 City parks 462 Public library 434 Senior services ® 389 Recreation ® 359 programs SD Youth services ® 269 Quality of Life Services Quality of Life Services too ID eD tD ao SD .D :D :o D _ CI!/ D... Cl4" {v411t Wtiry <DUI P4N:11m YWP'vHv: WauOfl'atltn oat[ •crK✓. p,yarcc .roar ran •,tyla[.Mimt 1W pAp� b Businesses, Employment, and Housing availability Businesses, Employment, anc Housing Business, Employment, and Housing too vo w 70 N so +a ]0 3l 70 m 0 O.t<all iva0aDg4y of qu.lRY al Feta4 aptbni Emplor,tnt avab-04Rbgt HO OUAt4Yol OuslnMy¢s nM ppp,IriNlltkS Mq,e,:es de+eiapnmt •Pav F.Y •G..darxcdlmt Good or Total Excellent Responses Overall quality of 489 businesses Availability of 70.9 -184 businesses new Qualdevelopment 471 development m ® Retail options 66.5 465 Employment 261 opportunities Housing 70.0 406 availability Businesses, Employment, anc Housing Business, Employment, and Housing too vo w 70 N so +a ]0 3l 70 m 0 O.t<all iva0aDg4y of qu.lRY al Feta4 aptbni Emplor,tnt avab-04Rbgt HO OUAt4Yol OuslnMy¢s nM ppp,IriNlltkS Mq,e,:es de+eiapnmt •Pav F.Y •G..darxcdlmt II Mobility Good or Total Response Excellent Car travel 68.0 505 Traffic flow 504 Public parking 492 Paths and trails 460 Walking 62.1 444 Biking 280 Mobility too 90 80 ]0 04 i0 40 10 20 a6 t 10 0 Car va"A traffic flow •Pm Mobility 7-0 Pe PuMk Paths and W11khp eNhg pvk.s Peds Pah .G .Excdtm Protective Services Protective Services Protective Services mo nn eo vo no ;a 40 is io In n.l Pol!<+ rwe ENS F,oerce y VMe RePNedte% pewRbn .Pm Fat •G.dnF.&R t.s Me pemllb Good or Total Excellent Responses Police 420 Fire 406 EMS 388 Emergency preparedness 333 Crime prevention 397 Fire orevention 361 Protective Services Protective Services mo nn eo vo no ;a 40 is io In n.l Pol!<+ rwe ENS F,oerce y VMe RePNedte% pewRbn .Pm Fat •G.dnF.&R t.s Me pemllb Code and Traffic Enforcement Good or Total Responses Excellent Code enforcement309 Animal control 340 haffic Enforcement 386 Municipal courts 243 Code and Traffic Enforcemen Code and Traffic Enforcement ma vo ao 70 W 50 as to 20 la 17.1 13.5 18.9 a �_ _..20010000— __ �-- Cade mfff a t Mb I mntrd Traffic eMarcerrmne .Pm ret •4mda Excellent Municlaal Corns Streets and Traffic Streets and Traffic loo 50 00 10 Go 50 40 ]0 }0 10 0 Streets and Traffic Good Total or Excellent Responses Street repair 425 Street lighting 68.6 425 Street cleaning 72.6 414 Sidewalks and trails 73.9 389 Traffic signals]NONE Trdfllt Sk9a 430 Streets and Traffic loo 50 00 10 Go 50 40 ]0 }0 10 0 Streets and Traffic }r a }1.5 }j,l 19 ry SlR1:t repllf WPM I1.'�tlnC SViPt dMMnC SldiwawY in7 Trdfllt Sk9a V ml: •Pov fat •Gmda Ex9Rmt 71 Waste Services Waste Services 100 so 70 W 50 40 20 70 10 0 Waste Services Good Total Responses 5.5 or Excellent Garbage collection 433 Recycling r Yard .9e 417 ,Sewer pxk p 384 Storm drainage r 391 Yard waste pickup 390 Waste Services 100 so 70 W 50 40 20 70 10 0 Waste Services Longoria said some things are very strong, while others are not. He noted that 53% of the respondents rated Georgetown as poor for employment opportunities. Councilmember Fought asked for more insight. He said he is concerned about the employment opportunities. Fought said it does not make sense that we are the fastest growing City but ranked low for employment opportunities. He said he would question why so many people are moving here if there were limited employment opportunities. Longoria explained that people could be moving to Georgetown with the intention to commute to work elsewhere. 15 5.5 GwDay. RP[YCI41C 5~ i101m Q'M.N Yard .9e cdlectlm pxk p •P. rat •Ganda EaLAm: Longoria said some things are very strong, while others are not. He noted that 53% of the respondents rated Georgetown as poor for employment opportunities. Councilmember Fought asked for more insight. He said he is concerned about the employment opportunities. Fought said it does not make sense that we are the fastest growing City but ranked low for employment opportunities. He said he would question why so many people are moving here if there were limited employment opportunities. Longoria explained that people could be moving to Georgetown with the intention to commute to work elsewhere. Longoria said the poor rating in traffic and mobility is not uncommon. He said the parking and traffic flow would be worth looking at. Mayor Ross said Council is aware of these issues and has had studies conducted for the last three years. Ross asked for insight on the walking and biking results. Ross said he is interested in why citizens are not recognizing the incredible walk and bike trails in the City. Longoria said the different types of biking are not defined. He explained that even though one would assume biking for recreational purposes, it could be that they are referring to being able to ride a bike to work. Brainard said the City does not have bike lanes but does have great trails. Morgan noted that the total responses on the right side show how many people actually responded to that particular question. He noted that those with a strong interest or complaint would answer while others might not have participated in the response. Brainard said employment opportunities would be similar. Responses tend to be the opinion of those who are not satisfied rather than those who are. Councilmember Gonzalez asked for the margin of error. Longoria said it is a 5.5% margin of error for the survey. He went onto explain that there would not be that much of a difference in large response rates, even with a change in margin of error. Ross asked about the interpretation of raw data. Longoria said the City could specifically look at parking and traffic or other specific things in future surveys. He said it would even be possible to ask people for solutions. Longoria said that protective services in Georgetown is well above normal benchmarks. He noted that Code and traffic enforcement also had very encouraging results. Longoria said that streets and traffic is close to meeting benchmarks but there seems to be issues with traffic signals. Waste services received results well over the normal benchmarks, as well. Longoria spoke on Citizen Contact with City Employees. He said this was an excellent number. Longoria explained that 64.2% of respondents had had some contact with a City employee. 91 % of the respondents rated their overall impression of the City employee as good or excellent. Longoria spoke on the citizens' experience with City events. 51.2% said that they had attended a City sponsored event. 95% of the respondents rated the overall impression of the event at good or excellent. Longoria went on to speak on items without clear benchmarks, which included Pace of Growth, Service Use, Support for Tax Increases and Perceptions of Safety. He explained that there were strong favorable responses to people being satisfied with the City's growth management, but some think the population is increasing too fast. Pace of Growth Percent about right Total response Business growth 52.9 408 Retail growth 48.1 426 Job growth 41.0 288 Population growth 25.3 439 Pace of Growth Pace of Growth too so eo 70 eo 50 40 70 70 t0 P Populatbt 9e'0h Jd gvM Rete/ gowth Wv�rnea To"'0t .wch tro ilaw •Sbr .pbout n.,ht .lest •xuth too lavt Service Use Over the Last Year v t More than 12 times Total Responses Downtown square 44.2 491 Visited a city park 26.1 488 library 21.4 491 Ity Recreation centers 15.1 485 1Recreation programs 9.9 486 4outh services 9.8 481 v t Service Use Over the Las IDD vo eo >o ao Service Use Over the Last 1. Oo. to YMtedacRY CMIW" Reveatw e are Wk tt ffs •Ilnc+ .1.)1h16 •)1)ikm .1)•)6lkibt Longoria spoke on the service use over the last year. He said that a lot of people are visiting the downtown on a regular basis. He said the purpose of the visits could be broke out in future surveys. Sources for Local News SOURCES OF CITY NEWS Longoria explained that one quarter of the responders visit the City's website. Longoria noted that a good percentage of responders support dedicated tax increases. Support for Dedicated Tax Increases Support for Dedicate) Incre-1 -,- Support for Dedicated T IN eo m a so sss s 20 .0 srr x. to Snell vudksafery Vailaand YWh o meFtmence rec ww. wewams eni �Snun¢Y ePOo+e •dppwe Su Longoria said the City has very strong numbers in the Perceptions of Safety category. Mean Support percent support or strongly support Total Responses Street 3.0 81.3 429 maintenance Public safety 3.0 80.3 421 Parks and rec 2.9 75.6 406 programs Youth programs 2.8 72.4 377 Dovmtovm 2.8 68.7 405 Improvement , Senior serim 2.8 67.9 402 Transit services 2.7 63.8 400 Library services 2.6 60.3 393 Support for Dedicate) Incre-1 -,- Support for Dedicated T IN eo m a so sss s 20 .0 srr x. to Snell vudksafery Vailaand YWh o meFtmence rec ww. wewams eni �Snun¢Y ePOo+e •dppwe Su Longoria said the City has very strong numbers in the Perceptions of Safety category. Perceptions of Safety Mean Percent very Total safe or responses somewhat safe Neighborhood 3.9 98.9 442 (day) Neighborhood 3.6 93.6 441 (night) Downtown 3.5 94.5 405 Shopping centers 3.4 92.9 410 Recreational 3.3 86.4 286 waters Drinking water 3.3 84.4 425 City parks 3.2 83.4 338 Perceptions of Safety Perceptions of Safety ico I nn eo fQ nn ;a 4 KQ �o u a•.c 2a o eklQMw�mOakkHaaf'[oJ Iw.nw«a SMCOhQ •��atHn.Y 01"M2 Co Iday) fnYJen eenevt v.atca o-aty •xmvfeatal •San Mtwaafe $onewbatufe MVp We Dr. Longoria went on to provide an Overview of the Findings starting with the High Quality areas. • Quality of New Development • Quality of New Businesses All Protective Services • All Quality of Life Services • All Dimensions of Customer Services for Citizen -initiated contact • Overall Value Based on Taxes Paid Longoria followed with the Overview of the Findings for Areas for Improvement. • Employment Opportunities • Bike Travel • Walking • Traffic Flow • Traffic Signals • Parking • Street Repair Longoria provided Considerations for the Next Survey • Reduce the number of questions to increase response rates • Provide an online survey for students in collaboration with Southwestern University • Identify ways to increase renter response rates • Continue to build the capacity of the CRPT and provide pro bono services to the City (MS4 Permit Study is currently underway) Councilmember Fought said he likes surveys such as this and would like to see Longoria and his crew continue it. Fought suggested that just as much can sometimes be learned from open ended questions and encouraged Longoria to use open ended questions in the next survey. Longoria said they had done this with City of San Marcus and had good results, in that people could make their own comments and suggestions. Jonrowe thanked Longoria. She asked if a Spanish language survey option was offered online. She spoke about providing a link for those who would like this option. Jonrowe asked about cities without utilities and how they poll for surveys. Longoria said they generally create a website blast for responses. He said this can be a problem with margin of error, because continuity is important, and the methodology would be different, where it needs to be the same. Jonrowe asked if age groups were clearly recognized in the survey. Longoria said there was nothing shocking. Jonrowe then asked about race difference in response. Longoria said African Americans had very few responses. Jonrowe asked if this could show specific needs in specific groups that needs to be addressed. Jonrowe said the last survey the City conducted was skewed toward white retired people. Jonrowe asked about the household instead of individuals and if it is a disadvantage to larger households. Longoria answered that one person generally represents the views of that household regardless of how many persons are in the home. Longoria said online surveys are more useful with students and singles. Mayor Ross asked about the survey results in regard to voting patterns. Longoria answered that people voting are predominantly over 65. Paul Diaz, the City's Budget Manager, then presented slides with showed the alignment of the Survey Results with proiects currently happening in the City. Aligning Survey Results: Transportation P. $105 Million Road Bond Passed in FY2015 • largest Capital Improvement Bond in the history of the city • Southwest Bypass • $10 Million in Sidewalk Improvements ► Public Works Reorganization in FY2017 o Hiring process for Public Work Director underway ► Williams Drive Corridor Study underway ► Laying the foundation for a Bike Plan Analysis w. Aligning Survey Results: Economic Development ► FY2017 budget continues efforts related to the Retail Study and Recruitment Strategy r Business Retention Program Targeted Industry Sector Recruitment ► workforce Analysis ► Inaugural Georgetown Economic Development Symposium Aligning Survey Results: Quality Development ► Updating the MUD Policy ► FY2017 Budget featured funds for a Cost to Serve Stud, > Helps understand the fiscal impacts of new development and annexation. Planning is currently working on the 2030 Comp Plan Review and updates to the Unified Development Code I Mayor Ross thanked Paul Diaz and Dr. Longoria. B. Austin Avenue Bridges Update -- Nathaniel Waggoner, Transportation Analyst Nat Waggoner, the City's Transportation Analyst, provided the update presentation of the Austin Avenue Bridges Project. He began the presentation with an agenda for discussion. • Purpose and Need • Accomplishment to Date • Environmental Processes • Steel Testing Results • Mid Term Project Scope and Fee Review • Next Steps Waggoner described the purpose and need of the project. He explained that the project is needed because the segment of Austin Avenue from Morrow Street to 31d Street, including the two bridges crossing the San Gabriel River, is load restricted and fails to meet current design standards on both bridges. Waggoner said the bridges have deteriorated and this has resulted in falling debris on and below the bridges, which presents safety hazards to traffic and trail users. Waggoner said the purpose of the project is to improve mobility on Austin Avenue and to ensure the safety of pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular traffic along Austin Avenue between Morrow Street and V Street and on the multi -use trails below the two bridge crossings. Waggoner explained that the project offers opportunities to expand the accessibility and mobility of Austin Avenue for all modes of travel, while preserving a gateway into historic Georgetown. Waggoner noted that the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required for any project with a federal funding component. He explained that this project would follow the NEPA process in order to remain eligible for additional funding from state and federal sources. Waggoner spoke on the Austin Avenue Bridges Project accomplishments. He explained that there has been heavy interaction with the public, very active public communication and involvement, and that communication has greatly improved. • 19 Separate Stakeholder Engagements • 2 Public Meetings, Section 106 Consulting Parties Introduction • Direct Mailings, Media Releases, Active Website and Email Campaign Waggoner spoke on the Technical Study • 2 Forensic Studies, involving 4 separate engineering firms and TXDOT • Multiple Engagements with TXDOT Bridge experts, regarding load postings and BRINSAP • Surveying and Alternates Development Waggoner went on to speak on the Environmental Analysis at length and provided information that has been made simple and accessible to the public. 71i Environmental analysis • Draft Technical Reports • Draft Alternatives Analysis • Multiple Engagements with TOOT Environmental ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES i .r otl,.noweJR4)MIMRa) r .i s.m.unaaon+....su••,e.�..monu i I ..,. .,.,<. ..,.......».tea. .... ....-w„M,..._.M.,^..., j �d-„M E-4itii Environmental Process • National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) • Overarching environmental regulation • Evaluation of a range of alternatives • Requires coordination with multiple Federal and State agencies Environmental Process • Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) • Bridges are eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places • Consultative law that requires project sponsors to consider potential impacts to bridges and other historic resources comply with Section 106 of the NHPA • Currently have 12 consulting parties registered with TxDOT framing Kuwrc Proyen'vr• A CITIZEN'S GUIDE TO SECTION 106 REVIEW z-\ui-mly,/��i "�it7 liFfe ,n + t :•`. �a - ���� t t 1L i7�- — Environmental Process • Section 4(f) of the U.S. Department of Transportation Act • Protects publicly owned and accessible parks, recreation areas, and wildlife and waterfowl refuges and historic sites, regardless of ownership and accessibility. • Process includes an alternatives analysis to determine if there is a prudent and feasible alternative to the use of Section 4(f) property. Waggoner explained that staff has been working closely with TXDOT to support the process. He noted the importance of protecting resources paid with public dollars. Waggoner explained that the steel testing for the Austin Bridges Project has been shared with the public. He explained that the purpose of the steel testing is to determine actual yield strength of the steel in order to improve load bearing calculations used in BRINSAPs. He went on to describe the method: • Six steel samples were taken from the existing steel girder webs • Samples were tested in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards for tensile and hardness properties • Consultant reanalyzed the load rating of the controlling span using the yield strength value derived from Lewis's material testing Waggoner explained the Results. He said that the steel is stronger than the default value set by the state. He then described load posting. He explained that consultants were asked to rerun the results. Waggoner said the City has met with TXDOT engineers who are now reviewing the results. He explained that the City will receive the results by the end of the year and will then develop choices with the information. Results 1. Average yield strength of the samples was 38.Sksi, higher than the default 33ksi used in 2013, 2105 BRINSAPs. 2. Consultant reanalyzed the load rating of the controlling span using the new yield strength and recommends determined in accordance with T%DDT procedures, should be as follows: • Axle 20,000 lbs (legal limit) • Tandem axle 34,000 lbs (legal limit) • Single Gross vehicle 69,000 lbs (legal limit) • Combination vehicle 79,000 lbs (legal limit is 80,000) 3. TXDOT is reviewing report, guidance is expected by the end of the yeas 4. New yield strength will be incorporated into Alternative Analysis. Wa Doer next described the Mid -Term Scope Review. Based on enhanced public involvement and heightened environmental analysis, we anticipate needing additional funding to complete this project. He explained that the project is 50% done with scope and 75% done with the schedule. Waggoner explained that the project has gone from 4 choices to 12 choices, 8 of which are viable choices. Brainard asked about the percentage billed. Waggoner answered that the route and design studies have been billed. Waggoner explained that because of the additional effort, there will need to be additional funding. h.\ci i i�i,:�}T •ili;'iZRai?-i'.: ,?i,u� \1�� i �h\�=, 1-:T Due to: • Heightened environmental revievk Federal and State coordination • Independent analysis reports and forensics testing • Additional alternatives needed due to the project publicity and historic nature • Additional stakeholder outreach, webpage support, coordination/meetings and press releases Additional coordination with TxDOT on AFA, independent reports, load posting, unscheduled BRINSAP inspection • Schedule has lengthened by an additional 12 months • 50% complete with original tasks 7S^/ of the newinal <rhpdulp timpfrnmp Waggoner spoke on the Phase II Environmental and the Amendments needed for additional services. Neededto: • Solidify the documentation of 10 alternative and identify the most feasible alternatives. • Present complete and documented information at Public Meeting 3 as to how we ended up at the most feasible and prudent solutions. • Meeting and exhibit support, completion of technical fieldwork and reports, archeological studies, and complete the section 4f process. • Advise and coordinate with TXDOT for the ENV process and recommended mitigation if needed. MEW �17=Zf!zr-U ENVaar/Public Involvement Luntp Som 5140.000.00. Miscellaneous Roadway Lump Sum $30,000.00'1 Project Management andAdminisoation Lamp Stan S15.000.00� Other Direct Erpenses Lump Snnr $7,000.00 Added Forensics S88,000.001 Total Compensation (not to exceed): Recommended funding source is the Streets Arterial Resen�e Account Budget Amendment in January will reflect transfer 5280, He explained that there is available funding in the street arterial reserve account and that Austin Avenue is an arterial. Waggoner said this will be presented to the Georgetown Transportation Advisory Board (GTAB) on Friday of this week and then brought back to the City Council. He explained that staff would be asking Council for the budget amendment in January. Waggoner provided a slide on Next Steps • Between Now and March 2017 • GTAB (14 OCT 2016) • Council Consideration of Task Order Amendment (25 Oct 2016) • Agency Coordination, Section 106 Consultation led by TxDOT (Mar 2017) • Consider Public Meeting#3 (Mar 2017) • Workshop with Council on Alternatives Analysis (June 2017) • Submit Environmental Assessment to TxDOT (June/July 2017) • Environmental Assessment review period (Aug 2017) • Public Hearing (Oct 2017) • Decision to progress alternative from 30%- 100% design (Mar 2018) Waggoner described the importance of Public Meeting Number 3 and its necessary components including state recording. He spoke on the importance of sharing input on the project and provided a slide on the communication regarding public input. i �✓;,V�=li��+.1�1�1B,67- Llj l':C-1 "L t!�l 11_-v Share Input on the Project Take a survey here or access it from home via the project website: http://AustinAye.Georgetown.org Share the survey link with those that might be interested. Share general comments on a comment card or send them to us via email at: AustinAve@georgetown.org Leave your comments on the project maps. Share your Photos and Stories! Do you have any photos or stories of the Austin Avenue Bridges? We would like to catalog these as a part of this project) Send your photos to the team or use these hashtags to submit on social media: ageo rgetow ntxb ridges ftaustinavebridges ttaustinavegeorgetown Ngeorgetowntx Mayor Ross commented that this is clearly defined. Councilmember Jonrowe asked if the scope of alternatives was narrowed, would it cost the City less. Waggoner said the state would not allow the narrowing and it would not make a difference in cost. Councilmember Fought cautioned about the alternative choice of tearing the bridges down because it would be limited to Austin Avenue but would greatly affect 135 updates also. Fought said the City could not proceed with a self-inflicted wound. He explained that Council will work around that and must commit to be reasonable in the solutions. Waggoner said the concern is real and evident in working with the public. He explained that the City is working hard to develop the estimates on project durations and wants to mitigate temporary construction durations. He explained that the City will make every effort to keep one lane open, both ways, at all times. Waggoner went on to say that temporary closures will be done at periods of very low traffic, likely not to take more than a couple of hours. Fought said he would be happy with that approach and that staff and Council will pay attention and commit. Fought said the City must make the bridges safe and must listen to the engineers. He added that the City must take the time to find out what is right and pay attention to the concerns. City Manager, David Morgan, said, as alternatives are presented, the scope and anticipated life cycle benefits would be provided. This shared information will include what is involved, how long, etc. He said it is imperative that the promotion is to keep the road open. Morgan went on to say that the same should apply to the Williams Drive project. Morgan said the City will be diligent in its communications. Brainard asked for the alternatives. Waggoner said some of the alternatives would include doing nothing, alignment through the park, one way lanes on sides of bridges, replacing the bridges in kind, taking the bridge as is and widening with an underneath structure and building a pedestrian facility with a bridge on each side. Brainard asked if all alternates would be considered. Waggoner said it is required by the state to review all of them, but that, of course, some would make no sense. Waggoner said all would be shared with the community and it will be shared what staff thinks are the best alternatives. Morgan said it will be a cumbersome process, but the City must position itself for grant funding so that 100% of the cost is not bared by the community. Eby asked about the public hearing by the state and if that would be TXDOT. She also asked if the state could dictate what can be done. Waggoner answered that TXDOT will need to provide the Public Hearing, which will make the City eligible to move forward. He explained that the City must be legally defensible. Waggoner said staff recognizes Council's role in this project. He said that the state will not dictate what can be done but the state will make sure the alternative is prudent and the state would not allow an alternative if it was not safe. Mayor Ross explained that when the environment hurdles have been overcome, it will come back to Council. Waggoner explained that it will be brought back to Council in June or July of 2017. Mayor Ross recessed the meeting to Executive Session under Sections 551.071, 551.074, 551.086 and 551.087. Executive Session In compliance with the Open Meetings Act, Chapter 551, Government Code, Vemon's Texas Codes, Annotated, the items listed below will be discussed in closed session and are subject to action in the regular session. C. Sec. 551.071: Consultation with Attorney - Advice from attorney about pending or contemplated litigation and other matters on which the attorney has a duty to advise the City Council, including agenda items - 3834 Partners, Ltd—Settlement Agreement in Lieu of Condemnation Sec. 551.074: Personnel Matters - City Manager, City Attorney, City Secretary and Municipal Judge: Consideration of the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, discipline, or dismissal Sec. 551.086: Competitive Matters - Buckthorn Update Sec. 551.087: Deliberation Regarding Economic Development - Project Hop - Project Cat Adjournment Mayor Ross adjourned the meeting at 6:00 PM to begin the Regular Council Meeting. Approved by the Georgetown City Council on 10 [ aS � 30 Date -( 46 Dale Ross, Mayor Attest: City c tart'