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MIN 07.13.2016 CC-SMinutes of Meeting of the Governing Body of the City of Georgetown, Texas Wednesday, July 13, 2016 The Georgetown City Council will meet on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 2:00 PM at the Council Chambers at 101 E. 7' St., Georgetown, Texas The city of Georgetown is committed to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you require assistance in participating at a public meeting due to a disability, as defined under the ADA, reasonable assistance, adaptations, or accommodations will be provided upon request. Please contact the City Secretary's Office, at least four (4) days prior to the scheduled meeting date, at (512) 930-3652 or City Hall at 113 East 8' Street for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. Mayor Ross called the meeting to order at 2:29 PM. All Councilmembers were in attendance with the exception of Councilmember John Hesser, District 3, Councilmember Ty Gipson, District 5 and Councilmember Rachael Jonrowe, District 6. Councilmember Jonrowe joined the meeting at 2.45 PM Regular Session (This Regular session may, at any time, be recessed to convene an Executive Session for any purpose authorized by the Open Meetings Act, Texas Government Code 551.) A. Call to Order— A Special Meeting of the City Council Budget Workshop Continued from July 121h: Workshop overview, discussion and possible action regarding the FY2017 City of Georgetown Budget and Tax Rate -- David S. Morgan, City Manager City Manager, David Morgan, opened the continuation of the budget presentation from the previous day. He explained the discussion items of the day. Morgan said staff would be getting clarification to Council on building materials and providing detail of the funds with detailed expenses and revenues and their relationships. Brewer began the presentation. Mayor Ross asked the Council to remember that now is the time to ask questions or voice concerns regarding the budget. It is helpful to staff to hear the concerns as soon as possible to allow time for adjustments, he explained. Brewer began the presentation with Special Revenue Funds. She reminded the Council that the Paramedic Fund and Street Maintenance fund were presented the previous day. Brewer said special revenue funds represent funds restricted for specific purpose, based on state law or local designations. Brewer spoke on CVB revenues from the 7% local hotel occupancy tax for hotel stays. She said that FY 2016 will end up better than projected and staff is projecting a 31'% increase of revenues in FY2017 with the additions of the Hampton and the Sheraton. She spoke on the expenditures of $1.05 million related to enhanced advertising and conference recruiting funds and a fiscal impact study of the arts in Georgetown to provide information to continue to promote the arts. Brewer spoke on the expense of the CVB's move to the current Council Chamber when City Hall moves to Downtown West. Brewer spoke on the Council Discretionary Fund. She explained that this comes from Council's dedication of setting surplus aside, ending excess fund balances. Brewer said approximately $185,000.00 remains from FY2015. It is estimated that $750,000.00 will be able to be transferred in FY2017 for an ending balance of $935,000.00. Brewer spoke next on the Main Street Fund accounts for downtown fagade and annual seed monies. She next spoke on the GEDCO and GTEC budgets and said that sales tax has been budgeted at a 4.5% increase for both. Brewer spoke on the expenditures planned. She said that the budget also accounts for any economic development agreements that are in play at this time. She said there is a responsibility to Tasus for $6,000 and Dispersol for $60,000.00. Morgan added that they are expecting a future request from TLCC and a placeholder of $100,000.00 has been added to the budget and is included in the GEDCO budget. Brewer said the GTEC figure is for roads and transportation projects that are related to economic development. Brewer spoke on TXDOT reimbursements, the Mays Street project and the Rivery extension. Morgan said the Airport Road project is at Airport Road and Lakeway. He said there is a transportation need there, as well as the importance for economic development in that area. Morgan said the right of way would be ripe and ready to go for economic development expansion. He said the project was included in the FY2016 budget. Brewer spoke on the library and cemetery funds. She spoke on court funds for municipal court fines. Brewer explained that these must be spent for specific purposes. At this time, the funds are slotted to be used toward the benefit of new Council Chambers. Brainard asked about the Rivery Road project. Briggs said the right of way acquisition is coming to a close. Briggs said there have been some complexities with the purchase of individual properties. He also mentioned that GISD has a large piece of property within the project. Briggs said the right of ways should be completed within a couple of months and construction should start in one year to 14 months. Brainard asked if this was on schedule. Briggs confirmed. Mayor Ross reminded everyone that the Convention Center is opening this month. Brainard asked if the delay in the Rivery project was because of lack of resources. Briggs said the delay is more because of possession and condemnation of people's properties. He explained that the City has to wait until the property is completely vacated in order to have access. Brainard asked if GISD is a condemnation property. Briggs said it should be a clear acquisition process with proper pay. Morgan said he is already working with GISD and explained how the needs of the school district and the City align. He explained that the City will make transportation improvements in an agreement for the property. Morgan said there will be several benefits for both the City and GISD. Mayor Ross asked about timelines. Briggs said construction would take another 2.5 to 3 years. Jonrowe asked about the Main Street Fund and the facade program. She said there seems to be a lot of volatility or fluctuation. Brewer said this is because it is based on actual grant requests from owners. Mayor Ross asked how much money was requested in fagade grants in 2017. $150,000 will be available said Brewer. Brewer said the requirements are that the building is within the downtown overlay district and the improvements must be to the outside of the building. Brewer said up to $500 in sign grants are also available, restricted to commercial buildings. Jim Briggs, the City's General Manager of Utilities began a presentation on Utilities. Briggs began with the electric fund. He provided a map of the 2016-17 Capital Improvement Projects for Electric and spoke on these projects. Briggs said the power supply costs have been 35 to 38 million for the last two years. He explained that as load increased, so did the power supply. Briggs said the City is now seeing an 8% growth in the utility each year, which is an abnormally high growth for a utility in Texas. He said the City must be able to meet the demand of the growth. Briggs spoke on several contracts for electricity and a contract for a gas project. He spoke on the wind farm contracts and a solar farm contact and its benefits to the City. Briggs explained that these contracts will allow the City to know what the price is and ensure that the cost stays relatively low as we continue to grow. Briggs went on to say that 60% of the electric service territory is a direct competition and the City must compete for customers. He added that in the last 15 to 20 years, the City has acquired 99% + of the customers in that area. He explained that reliability and service cost is important and retail can only take place within the City boundaries, other than at its own facilities. Briggs explained that the City serves both Scott & White and the Outlet Mall. He said that a Capital Improvement Project is looking for infrastructure for additional service. Briggs described the Shell Road growth and the energy needs there. He described the need for improvements and upgrades in the Serenade area. Briggs spoke on a number of projects with streets, transportation and the Downtown West project and the additional load. Briggs explained that some will convert from overhead to underground utilities. He went on to explain the need for a secondary circuit for the Scott & White hospital expansion. Briggs explained that the SW Bypass will allow for more extension of services. Jonrowe asked if the City was still participating in the pilot program for battery storage. Briggs confirmed and said the storage facility was constructed at Rabbit Hill. Briggs added that the City is looking at other options, possibly internally evaluating battery operation and how it might fit into the equation of renewable energy. Mayor Ross recognized Briggs and his staff for the 100% Green award they recently received in Dallas Briggs spoke next on the water and wastewater fund and provided a slide and explanations. r rvmsaa,...rasr e Capital Improvement Plan Program funding sources: - Operating Revenue (utikly rated Impact Fees Capital Improvement Plan addresses need for superior water, wastewater, irrigation service, and electric. Determined by many tactors oxx unuey Cu9omer base 9.Mh 0a? ems Semite imprp\ t al a gin6inrras"nue StateandWesul readem00 - CpmpefGve aevantaae 'a CwtactualebGgatiMs ;a g rir01:<11110:T� Water Services - Georgetown Water Mains -$6,274,000 =_0 a- LeaLwer Interconnect -5575,000 - bp'pr+nately i.000tt LA 31'�ne. �-' 1 - >p:enhalmermtnea'w.T lawCe'wNee rptem - pp;Ml�dllvplplh amsm•^n(XOt3 PME3I - - prvnh ManL y'Atrm Oi::•a • West Loop -$2.719.000 - i�Ofj5Y a91V,yeRN<n t004 V•[MI 7},.'-< - ilp:x<en^.nF Pft:'lirc: xnh? _ 9N,tAaMY[C\\bn rwPOtw'ryntn, irJ p#i;V NnOStatiLn - ewa�]wane.avia,awdiaw.ep«:wN.a+ • CR 255. 53,000,000 -=ppe•ma;Nypm ellwne; arctiman tN. a.tteo3e a) - CMnNi0MC1\\w[tm Llil[I<(In! IPpYenenl WrGe: Eei�ant'Ip paR11�lY[MLN rY 16 - um:. eab eanab.':vwnlmuwahteeav, wo. baa��va«:vma.am.:eil 5tre8 Rehab -5330,000 - ts•. 1:- snt<rtvan.ea[) • Western District Line Upgrades -$250.000 ',—e 3 mnaa: Tt[o ,cx, e u !S'- fy+OrrAmue Water Services - Georgetown • Water Treatment -$6,100,000 - Lake Treatment Plant Maintenance -5600,000 • [srmat<e to nL<eappra.ira:N/l mason;a:auper/utas • Uk�nblamaintWn(e • Ntrl3teNJ1e<]n]tl.Y [O]Ilyst3811ti010n 6311am • M6tbnNUHMtntuYberNulM • EniaatM at53lmaon lFY1a/19) - south Lake Treatment Plant -511AM - • SMS<bn1m(]01)1 1u«e eealleeran« :.,.� • Desien120142010) • New V<nVrnNfatilr[yt1011Q31 • 5-IOywrdevlppman;pGn � • ]pyp .uftllrrvaonsallCm�lr_ • ,bwotimaleN535memror.! ' A Water Services - Georgetown • Water Treatment — Domel Pump Station -$4,500.000 • AEJI'.:ai:M3 WTN V�PMSJ[M!!ddn'.nlIMpI01Kl IfumlamfY Ifi), • Porential,rtotlmin83 minfw, (a�lonsOP•tldl'd Wrtain <w+nn,�+ams✓erountl. fY2027 Anflual audIM&I LM Water Services - Georgetown • Water Storage -$6,030,000 — Sun City Elevated Storage Tank - $3,050,030 • Repltte existing 400.000gallonelwated tank • Construct new 1.5 Wripn garon elevated tank • Required to meet grow•Ingdemands — Sequoia Ground Storage Tank - $2,500,000 3-4 mil -ion gaion tankon e* ,ting site •. GtnuMtadtki4steadof eevatedln rm,getnw�l:-age • Ino,eatH:[reated nater storageto help late plant peak • :erycompeuti:e tank prengcurrendy avadable — Tank Rehabilitation -$480,000 • Repair and rehabilitate existing metal tanks • TyOKdlb/requiretlevery II-15)ears • Airport Road Rouse tank (2017) • Daniels Mountain smalltank 12018) • Daniels Mountain large tank 120141 Jonrowe asked about the difference of residential water cost and commercial water cost. She said she noticed that other cities seem to have adopted the philosophy of charging less for commercial water. Mayor Ross explained said Council gave direction that commercial needs to pay more than residential. Briggs said the City does not currently have a demand rate for commercial. He said staff has been analyzing the data and working on recommendations. Briggs said there is a concern because commercial generally impacts restaurants and other small businesses. He explained that staff is looking into taking a look at increasing irrigation rates for commercial, but not the cost of doing business. Briggs said he will come back to Council with recommendations. This issue will be going to the Georgetown Utility Systems Advisory Board right after the budget and the process will be discussed prior to that, Briggs explained. Brainard asked why water costs are lower than other cities and asked if Georgetown was collecting enough. Briggs said yes because of the way the city maintains and manages its systems. Briggs provided slides and spoke on Wastewater Services next. Wastewater Services Wastewater Improvements - 513,636.000 ftrxaNSAPuikr PeNarCe Zane (twRZ) mis-Ss.S0e= Sv-.6..a.urv/...mu:Ne.eaau .ar,maMmuLJra — Lreet PltiC.tt-$]35,000 rc v'ura:Pea.-wp — Berry Geek.n;ercep!er. $1Z,�p00 Wastewater Services Wt stations -$9,532.000 — Park Lilt Stationai Fare Main - SIS82.0% • 4mreinpAnxxan-.a.Yi. ,•:L^Sa:m — Lin Stallon uppra9es-SSS0,000 • :aoauo Namv:: e.ma • uroa.n xau�.ev e,:+m•reu.: • Ifn:a+'ake:+ar.—fla:ePmfe:Pa•1Nm, Irrigation5ystem _ — NO lmprtremen[s appaaeP ' Sf�- rvt/amid wnM Wastewater Services Plant Upgrades - $10,155,000 — PmnBnrmn vhstaxater Leaament PlantFapami0n-Sl:9aa.000 • 13.8 MIIIOnBISMf[PferyN30P 6M,aM §180MOPIGa • iCfOmaeeamtoinia:ate PentwcLion oatetlen aPvaNWnlbm • �:�aPYLNIym'ry'bIP9 • ISMS]In(enitNPtlan Bl Mlu2ldEdtlelltl53.}UJALOrY l81 • ) a'PtPtMinuiler OxeyGNklnprteaer(SunGn.SnMPea9.MwY195.9PrryCrttk dfN4 — SaneapriPl w,a3Pwata nPa:Ment PlantaPr. PrPda-suor000 • sluaseGeua:ennan+renarmmwt.i<tn0ent amitPvaaun.anexea:nercroencenx • 9eP mHfwll meNanialr8[nem+PaWGewalerslWf! • Freeup En+p YC59attaNte Briggs showed a map of the 2016-17 Capital Improvement Projects for Wastewater. He explained that the area will not optimally develop unless certain services are provided. Briggs said timing is important with the expansion of necessary facilities and putting off expansion of less helpful projects. He explained that it has a big impact. .. GCORCfTO\YK� TFX.b Mayor Ross said it is important to point out that this utility fund is not part of the general fund and this $45 million project does not impact tax payers of Georgetown. Ross asked about the Berry Creek project. Briggs said it would start this year and take 2 years for completion. Briggs said the City has not increased rates since 2007. He said it was indicated last year that an increase would need to be looked at. Briggs explained that $1.50 is the proposed increase to handle the upcoming CIP expense. Jonrowe asked about possible rate increases. Briggs said at the conclusion of the presentation, there would be a discussion. A Public Works Presentation was provided next. Briggs explained how stormwater and streets were connected and discussed the creation of a new Public Works Department. • Public Works manages operations/planning, maintenance, and repairs City streets, sidewalks, drainage facilities, right of ways and airport functions. • Additional responsibilities include traffic control, emergency response, special events, regional planning and the Georgetown Transportation Enhancement Corporation (GTEC) • Funding for the street maintenance program comes from the General Fund and the Street Maintenance Sales Tax (reapproved in November 2014) • Funding for certain capital improvements comes from tax supported bonds (May 2015 ) Briggs spoke on the Public Works Street Rehabilitation Projects. • 61h Street and 71h Street— Between Walnut and Holly, Downtown Overlay District, $275,000.00 • 171h Street — Complete construction (Austin Ave. to Church St.); Point repair, regrading and overlay (Austin Ave. to Railroad Ave.); $75,000.00 design (FY17); $550,000.00 construction (FY1 B) • West 11th Street— Complete construction (Main St. to Rock St.); In conjunction with Sidewalk Bond Project; $416,000.00 • West 10th Street — Pavement rehab in conjunction with Sidewalk project on south side; $90,000.00. Briggs spoke on Street Maintenance. • Sealant —On hold until completion of overall review of maintenance practices; $100,000.00; Subdivisions of Churchill Farms, The Meadows, Pinnacle, La Conterra and Riata Trail; Streets — Cooperative Way, Snead Drive, Rock, Bridge, Scenic, Gabriel View and County Club. • Hot -In Place Recycling — $819,000.00 — On hold until completion of overall review of maintenance practices; Cutler process; Single pass, hot in place asphalt recycler; Whispering Wind, Park Ln., Shannon Ln., Janis Dr., San Gabriel Overlook, Sunshine, Meadowbrook, Oakland Dr., Ridge Oak, Live Oak and Spanish Oak • Surface Sealer - $1,200,000.00 - On hold until completion of overall review of maintenance practices; Dan Mood Trail, Honey Suckle Cove, Sunflower, Night Hawk Way, Yucca Cove, Wild Rose Way, Hill Country Dr., Six Flags Dr., High Trail Dr., Blacksmith, Lone Star Way, Berry Creek (SH 195 -Oak Tree), Airport Rd. (IH25-Cavu) • Point Repair and Overlay - $300,000.00; Thin overlay mix —1" new asphalt; Inner Loop (south of SH 29); Rockride Ln. (south of SE 1) Briggs spoke on Sidewalks next, and showed a slide depicting the cost at $2,179,000.00. • Projects funded from the May 2015 Bond Election • Projects for FY17 include: Pedestrian signals and curb ramps at existing intersections- $500K —Williams Drive Corridor and Austin Ave.; Old Town Northeast (University -SH 29) - $960K; Austin Ave. (91L University) - $178K; Austin Ave. (SH 29-FM2243) - $70K (design only); 81h Street (Rock-MKL) - $84K; 81' Street (Church -Myrtle) - $37K; 10", Street (Main -Rock) - $94K; 11'h Street (Main -Rock) - $151 K; Church Street (8t° -9'h) - $105K Briggs displayed and discussed Public Works Stormwater Services next. • Curb and Gutter Replacements: $500,000.00 annually; Replace deteriorating stand up curbs with new curb and gutter; Proposed for FY17 = Cottonwood, Willow, Parker, Judy, Golden Oaks, 161h & 171' Streets, Holly, 61 Street and Walnut • Infrastructure Improvements - $200,000.00: Rehab and repair above and beyond the normal maintenance. • Drainage Improvement Projects: 18'" & Hutto - $100,000.00 design only, Identify potential solutions to flooding between 151' and 19'h streets, west of Hutto Road, Construction FY18-19; 2nd & Rock Pond - $50,000.00 design only, Reconstruction poorly functioning water quality pond, Construction FY 18/19; Serenada Culvert - $50,000.00 design only, repair and upsize culverts at multiple crossing, construction FY 18-19; Village PID Inlet -$75,000.00 design and construction, alley and inlet repairs Briggs spoke regarding the Public Works Airport plans. He explained that the Airport Project has been pushed out until 2019 • Runway Rehab: FY19; $516,000.00; Main Runway (18/36); 4° overlay; 90 TxDOT/10 Airport • Wildlife Hazard Assessment and Mitigation Plan: $12,500.00, FAA Recommendation, 90 TxDOT/10 Airport Paul Diaz spoke on the airport fund. He explained how it is designed to be a self-supporting fund. Diaz said that, in past years, expenditures were more than revenues. Diaz said through the efforts of the Georgetown Transportation Advisory Board and City staff making necessary changes, the airport has now become more efficient. Leases and fuel charges were adjusted and collected in a more -timely manner. Diaz said many departments have worked together to accomplish the efficiency. He said, just two years ago, there was no system in place and best processes and practices were not being followed. Diaz spoke on how the budget also helped with airport funds. Other competitors in the market are now surveyed monthly. Diaz said the airport is now consistent with fuel. Diaz spoke on grant revenue through TXDOT. He again emphasized how the efforts and studies have resulted in positive changes. The airport is now market competitive in hangar rates. Fuel margins have increased in a positive way, explained Diaz. Diaz said all changes have been approached in a very public manner. Several meetings were held with airport tenants and interest groups and GTAB has been very present. Diaz went on to explain that the revenue project is 30% less than budget because of the price of oil and how this offsets both revenue and expenditure sides. He spoke on expenditures in 2016 and said that revenues will increase if oil prices increase. Diaz then spoke on expenditures in 2017. He said the cost of fuel is projected to increase by $600,000.00. Diaz said the anticipated fund will show $122,000.00 to a positive balance. He explained that this is two or three years ahead of projections. The Airport is building the fund balance. Brainard thanked the staff for the 180 degree turn around at the airport and thanked Russ Volk, the Airport Manager. Jonrowe asked for the level of confidence on the price of fuel going back. Diaz said it is a very volatile market, but the margin is a fixed portion — base charge and type of fuel. Mayor Ross asked if there was any general fund support at the airport. Diaz confirmed. Gonzalez asked if there was awaiting list for leases. Diaz said there is not awaiting list, but they are 100% occupied. Gonzalez asked if future CIPs are in this budget. Diaz said not now because they are currently in a holding pattern. He explained that vacated leases will need rehabilitation in the future and funds will be requested in future budgets. The Internal Services Fund was discussed next. Leigh Wallace explained that these are funds that provide direct services to other departments in the City — Facilities, Fleet, Information Technology and a handful of administrative groups within the Joint Services Fund. Wallace spoke on the facilities maintenance fund and explained how it is lower, if the airport position is funded because facilities personnel will be needed less at the airport. Wallace explained the Facilities Fund expenditures and the inclusion of the replacement of HVAC at the Recreation Center. Wallace spoke next on the Fleet Fund. She explained the ongoing inventory of all vehicles and equipment. She explained how charges are distributed to the using departments. Wallace explained how there are replacement costs overtime and spoke specifically regarding the replacement of police vehicles. Wallace said the new vehicles proposed to be purchased would include a vehicle for the fiber technician and the replacement of a VAC truck in the stormwater department. Ross asked if replacement is determined by mileage or age of a vehicle. Wallace said there are several factors. Stan Hohman, the Fleet Maintenance Supervisor, said both age and mileage are considered. He explained that many times, after a certain amount of years, manufacturers stop making parts, and vehicles become unrepairable. Hohman said, generally speaking, a vehicle is replaced at 12- 13 years old and/or 160,000 to 180,000 miles. Brainard asked if Crown Vics were police cars. Hohman confirmed and said they would be replacing 2008 and 2011 models. Morgan said these are shown in the Council Budget Workbooks under CIP Projects and under debt service on page 130. He explained how a $1.9 million short term debt sale in the spring would be used. Gonzalez asked if there is an expected return for replaced vehicles. Hohman said not likely, but that the City will be moving forward with less hold back vehicles. He said sometimes vehicles have been held too long, when they could be sold off at auction. Ross asked about the purchase of public safety vehicles. Morgan said other than the $1.9 million in short term debt, the rest of the purchase will be paid for with cash. Morgan said $3.39 million is the full replacement cost. Ross said that would leave $1.4 million to be cash funded. Gonzalez asked if sale funds go into the vehicle maintenance fund. Wallace said sale funds would go to the Vehicle Fleet ISF Fund. Information Technology was discussed next. Wallace said the Information Technology Department and the Finance Department have supported the change in methodology in charges and costs broken out to specific departments. She explained the advantage of recovering true costs. Wallace said the largest impact to the general service fund would be the Customer Care Department. Wallace reviewed the 3.5 positions requested for the Information Technology Department for Fire Support, Police Support and a Communications position. Wallace spoke on the Disaster Recovery Cloud Based Service requested. She explained that cloud based service will save a considerable amount of money for the City. Morgan said disaster recovery has been a discussion with the General Government and Finance Advisory Board (GGAF). Morgan said this would protect the City in the event of a disaster. He explained that the programs would be looked at on a pilot basis and then expanded if it works well. Wallace next explained the Joint Services Fund. She said it is a smattering of administrative services and recovers costs with allocation models. She explained that the fund has carried a significant balance from previous years. Wallace said this type of fund is not meant to build a balance. This year staff will apply a credit for 2016 and 2017, reducing fund balances since there is no need to accumulate. Wallace spoke on the highlights of budget requests in this area which included the request for tuition assistance, internal audits, inspection services supervisors, and the customer care increase coming from the Information Technology shift. Morgan explained the credit purpose and use. The City would then phase in the full impact of the new model over several years said Wallace — with a full recovery in 3 years. Ross asked who came up with the change in methodology. Wallace said many staff members have worked together through discussion but the largest part has been Paul Diaz, the City's Budget Manager. Diaz said complexity was removed, leaving better efficiency, but staying consistent with the past. Wallace went on to speak on the Self-insurance Fund. The City moved to this model of health insurance coverage in 2015, explained Wallace, with a goal to be a healthy fund in a few years. She said the fund has done much better and proceeded much faster than projected. Wallace explained that the claims and charges expected were lower. Morgan said the City is in a very rare position and there will be no need to increase City or employee contributions in 2017. He explained that the fund will continue to be watched very closely, as it could change drastically, quickly. It will be managed closely. Ross asked what is done with the money and where it is invested. Morgan said the investment policy is less than 1%. Laurie Brewer, the Assistant city Manager, said the best rates are in CDs right now. She said interest earnings might increase in the future. Morgan said the low interest rates do make amazing interest rates on bond sales. Morgan said the presentation was wrapping up and all funds had been discussed. He said staff will be working on follow-up and will provide answers to any requests from Council by the end of the week. Morgan said the official proposed budget would be presented at the workshop meeting on July 261i. He said the budget hearings would be on August 91i and August 161'. First and Second Readings will be August 23rd and September 13th. Morgan said he and staff will continue improving the budget process and thanked the many staff members that contributed. Jonrowe thanked Morgan for a successful process. Jonrowe asked what it would cost for closed captioning for council meetings. Morgan said this is being looked at through the ADA project and Council could make decisions regarding these matters. Ad,jourrrment Mayor Ross adjourned the meeting at 4.25 PM. Approved by the Georgetown City Council on U7 '' Lo (D Date -( taw - Dale Ides, Mayor S 1, Attest: Cie tetary