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MIN 03.22.2016 CC-WMinutes of a Workshop Meeting of the Governing Body of the City of Georgetown, Texas Tuesday, March 22, 2016 The Georgetown City Council will meet on Tuesday, March 22, 2016 at 3:00 PM at the Council Chambers, at 101 E. Th St., Georgetown, Texas The city of Georgetown is committed to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you require assistance in participating at a public meeting due to a disability, as defined under the ADA, reasonable assistance, adaptations, or accommodations will be provided upon request. Please contact the City Secretary's Office, at least four (4) days prior to the scheduled meeting date, at (512) 930-3652 or City Hall at 113 East W1 Street for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. Mayor Ross called the meeting to order at 3:03 PM. All Councilmembers were in attendance, with the exception of Gipson and Gonzalez. Gonzalez 3.30. Gipson 3.35 Policy Development/Review Workshop — Call to order at 3:00 PM A. Update and direction regarding the proposed tactics developed around the City Council's Strategies — David Morgan, City Manager David Morgan, the City Manager, provided the presentation and discussion. He began with the background and said that the City Council had attended multiple meetings to establish their goals for the City and the role of the City Council. The Council came to clarification on their rules of engagement among themselves and the community. Their specified goals involved culture, employees, internal process, customer and financial aspects. The City Council had established 14 Strategies — 9 Tier -1 Strategies and 5 Tier -2 Strategies. Morgan explained that staff, through Council direction from the visioning sessions, needed to come up with the process for the implementation of reaching the Council's goals. Morgan's presentation went through each of the 14 strategies and the proposed implementation for each. Morgan asked that Council confirm or recognize the strategies throughout the presentation and provide feedback. He said it would be helpful if they were honest in their feedback and speak up if staff had missed the intended mark. Morgan said that through Council direction, staff will develop the implementation plan and implement the tactic. He said that good clarification is of utmost importance. Morgan provided handouts for the Council to follow through the presentation. A copy of this handout is attached to these minutes. Morgan provided a slide on the City Council Visions that were established in their visioning meetings 1. Georgetown is a safe, healthy, happy, connected and truly diverse community where people live, learn, work, retire and play in an environment where they have ready access, throughout their lives, to arts, culture, essential services and the natural environment. 2. Our educated and skilled population, fiscally responsible governance, excellent infrastructure, and the beauty of our natural and man-made environments, attract new residents and businesses and enable us to create balanced and diverse employment centers and economic levels. Our strong sense of community connects us regardless of our cultural, age, ethnic or economic differences. Morgan showed the Goals of the City Council next: 1. Culture — Georgetown is a truly diverse, vibrant, inclusive and socially dynamic City where everyone has the opportunity to participate in, and benefit from, our economic, political and social activities. 2. Employee — Our outstanding and innovative City Employees work diligently to bring the Vision of Council to life and deliver exceptional services to our customers while exemplifying our Core Values. 3. Internal Process - Our policies and procedures are easy to understand, and consistently and professionally applied. Our internal processes are effective, efficient, fair, inventive, transparent and make us a desired destination for residents and businesses 4. Customer -Anyone interacting with the City will have such a positive experience that they will tell everyone about it 5. To maintain a fiscal environment conducive to attaining the goals of the City Morgan explained that there were 14 Teams of employees selected to develop tactics to achieve each strategy. These groups were cross functional and each group was comprised of 5 to 7 members. Morgan went on to describe the themes of the tactics for the strategies, which included: Communications and Branding • Identify • Education and Outreach • Cross -functional promotion and coordination teams • Consistency • Special event promotion Cost Analysis • Understand baseline O&M (e.g. Transportation) • Understand impact of decisions (e.g. land use, large capital investments) • Key capital asset replacement strategies Employees • Training • Professional Development • Recruitment Morgan showed the slide for the first Tier 1 Strategy. Strategy 1.1: Attract, Hire, Develop and Retain the Best People, and compensate them for the value they create • Establish and Consistently Administer a Competitive Compensation Program Based on Performance Results • Guide and Define Workplace Culture • Implement the Newly Created Employee Training and Development Program • Consistently Communicate the Current Compensation and Benefits Plan To Employees Councilmember Hesser said the concept of role, performance and accountability were missing. Morgan said each of the tactics are all based on performance and accountability and that it would be spelled out more clearly and specifically later in the presentation. Brainard said effective compensation programs include rewards. He said it is important to recognize employees who do a great job both financially and immediately. Strategy 1.2: Create a Customer Service Mindset • Develop and Implement a Customer Satisfaction Program • Create More Opportunities for Local Businesses to Do Business with the City • Provide Educational & Outreach Programs on City Department Functions & Activities • Evaluate Creation of City-wide Customer Service Center Morgan spoke about having establishing one phone number for all concerns and complaints. Jonrowe said she would like to encourage a policy regarding non-profit requests and fund raising requests. Morgan asked for clarification. Jonrowe said that fund raising should be discussed. Morgan said this was a good point. Strategy 1.3: Implement the Special Event and Destination Strategy • Create a Comprehensive Special Events Strategy • Maintain and Promote Calendar of Special Events • Simplify Special Event Application • Cross -functional Promotion and Communication of City Events • Activate Area Beyond Direct Square • Explore Feasibility of a Special Event Coordinator Discussion regarding these areas followed. Ross said the Swirl, Library Gala, Art Exhibit and Tarzan Play at the Georgetown Palace all occurred on the same night recently. He said it was quite the night downtown. He asked if staff could try to coordinate calendars better. Ross said it was exciting and enjoyable but would be better to separate events so people do not have to choose from conflicting events. Ross said all of the events were amazing. Strategy 1.4: Build and Maintain Entertainment Platforms/Venues • Build and Program City -owned Venues — Garey Park — San Gabriel Park — Downtown West • Citywide Space Inventory and Needs Assessment • Cross -Functional Team to Review and Promote City Events • Activate Spaces — Natural gathering spaces — Green space in dense areas — Sunday activities Strategy 1.5: Expand and Diversify the Tax Base (Increase Commercial Percentage) • Create and Maintain a Positive Relationship with the Business Community Through a Business Retention Program • Conduct Studies to Develop Meaningful Data to Drive the City's E.D. Program • Develop a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategic Plan • Develop a Process to Understand the Fiscal Impact and Trade-offs of Land Use Decisions • Update the City's Comprehensive Plan and Capital Improvement Plans to Align Resources and Preserve Opportunities for Retail and Employment Growth Morgan said it is important to understand the cost impact of different types of properties and developments and the cost to provide services and tax benefits. Strategy 1.6: Accumulate Funds to Account for Unfunded and Unanticipated Liabilities • Ensure Financial and Budgetary Policy Addresses Liabilities • Update Quarterly Financial Report to Include a List of City -Wide Liabilities, and an Update on the Balance in the Council Discretionary Fund • Incorporate O&M Costs in Planning of Capital Projects • Implement a Policy and Phase -In Approach for an Economic Uncertainty Fund to Address Short-term Revenue Declines • Develop a Comprehensive Facilities Master Plan and Funding Strategy for Key Facility Replacements Strategy 1.7: Create a Strategy to Increase Mobility • Complete Review and Propose Amendments for the Unified Development Code (UDC Chapter 12: Pedestrian and Vehicle Circulation) Related to Development Standards to Ensure They are Designed to Improve Mobility Efforts Within and Between New Developments • Continue to Develop and Implement Existing Transportation Plans Develop and Implement New and Updated Plans • Conduct a Feasibility Study of a Control Center for Traffic Operations and Signal Coordination • Continue to Adequately Fund Existing Transportation Infrastructure • Continue to Address Maintenance of Existing Infrastructure Morgan said the City would benefit from a coordinated traffic control center. He spoke on lighting up different signals at different times and maintaining street maintenance plans and mobility plans. Strategy 1.8: Attain and Maintain Superior Public Safety and Enhance the Perception of Safety • Fire Department Attain Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) Accreditation AND Police Department Attain Texas Police Chiefs Association (TPCA) Recognition • Achieve and consistently be one of the Top -tier Public Safety Agencies to Work for within Central Texas. Morgan mentioned specific recruitment of fire and police personnel and the importance of diversity Strategy 1.9: Attract Younger Workers/Young Professionals to the Community • Tailor Branding and Communications Towards Young Professionals • Improve Social Environment for Young Professionals (25-44) Morgan spoke about the importance of live music, animals and a young professionals' network in Georgetown. Fought said that he had read through the presentation carefully. He complimented Morgan and said the lack of questions from the Council is a result of the thoroughness of the presentation. Fought said that he has sat through 40 or 50 of these type of presentations in his lifetime and that Morgan was actually filling in the necessary portions. Fought said he was pleased and impressed. Morgan went on to present the Tier 2 Strategies: Strategy 2.1: Improve Communications and Advertising • Gain clarity on the City organization's branding strategy • Work to Create Consistency in Messages and Themes for Communications and Marketing Across the City. • Assess Department Resources and Make Needed Adjustments to Ensure Capacity to Generate and Sustain Communications and Marketing Content Across Multiple Platforms. • Assess and Enhance Existing City-wide Logo, Design, Graphics, and Presentation Guidelines. Morgan said it would be great to develop the communication department and wants to look at developing a resource package. Morgan said he would like to flush these out in the upcoming budget process and possibly hire a consultant. Jonrowe said communication and marketing should reach out to the Spanish community, as well. She said that all should be notified of meetings and communications. Jonrowe said that the hearing impaired should also be receiving communication and marketing. Morgan said this is great feedback. Strategy 2.2: Create and Maintain Outstanding Aesthetics, and a Welcoming Appearance and Spirit • Identify, Review, and Enhance Development Standards Related to Beautification • Clarify and Understand Costs Associated with Beautification and Secure Funding (including appropriations, grants, volunteers, etc.) • Continue and Increase Stewardship of all Public Rights-of-way (Including TxDOT) • Enhance Community Branding at Key Points Within the City Fought said the 135 gateway is overgrown and trashy. Morgan spoke on key entrance points being improved for creating good destination strategies. He spoke on the importance of improving the gateways. Strategy 2.3: Create an Asset Maintenance and Revitalization Plan • Develop a Uniform Asset Management and Work Order Process • Develop Baseline Annual Costs to Operate and Maintain (Annual Budget) • Define Impact of Operation and Maintenance (O&M) when Capital Additions and Replacements are Approved/Added • Clarify Capital Retirement/Replacement Strategy Strategy 2.4: Create a Comprehensive Annexation Strategy — (Formerly the Donut Hole Strategy) • Create a Broad -Based Annexation Plan with Alignment to the 2030 Plan • Effectively Communicate Planning Efforts and Outcomes Morgan said it is important to control where you grow. He explained that a comprehensive annexation plan is imperative. Morgan said that annexation must be promoted in a positive way. Strategy 2.5: Monitor, Promote, and Communicate a Long-term Water and Utilities Plan and Strategy • Implement and Monitor the Integrated Resource Plan (Long-term Water and Energy Plans) • Develop and Execute a Communication and Marketing Strategy for Customers Relating to the Resource Plan Morgan completed the presentation and spoke on the next steps. He asked for Council's feedback on the tactics presented and asked them to clarify their priorities to staff. Morgan said that with that direction, staff will return to Council with a multi-year implementation plan. Staff will continue to share and develop progress reports. Morgan said that he plans to integrate the strategies in work plans and the budget. Gonzales said that the presentation went into great depth and is taking a lot to digest. He said he would like to see the presentation again in the near future and hit the detail better. Morgan asked for clarification from Council. Morgan said some things can be done today, but not all. He would like to put some things on the radar screen for the correct times of implementation. Morgan said he wants to be able to get very detailed and provide regular progress reports to Council. He added that something that is not measurable, will not get done. He would like to see the strategies actively in use. Gonzalez asked Morgan for clarifications along the way to Council of what is needed to proceed and mentioned dollars and time as necessary elements. Brainard said the presentation was very well done. He said he sees no problems with the articulation. Jonrowe said she is glad this is an ongoing project. She said she is anxious to see how the plan aligns with the citizens' survey. She believes it is right on target. Morgan thanked the Council for the compliments. He mentioned the Consultant, David Giese, and thanked Jack Daily for all the hard work. Morgan said it was a very good team. B. Presentation and update regarding the EMS Program —John Sullivan, Fire Chief, Paul Diaz, Budget Manager, Leigh Wallace, Finance Director and Laurie Brewer, Assistant City Manager Fire Chief, John Sullivan provided the Power Point presentation on the EMS/Paramedic Program. He thanked those involved as part of the presentation team. Sullivan said that the presentation would review the background and provide a financial update and an operational report. He said he would explain the outstanding issues and next steps. Sullivan began with the factors leading to the EMS Decision: Savings on future deployment costs — Personnel — Equipmentlapparatus Increase service efficiency and effectiveness — Continuity of Care — Medical Dispatch City has funded modern dispatch center — Hybrid system would increase costs Sullivan explained that Fire Services are generally expensive. He said that he has looked at deficiencies and efficiency effectiveness. Sullivan explained that discussions began with the County in 2014. Discussions identified the need for 2 new ambulances to address the increasing call volume. Sullivan mentioned the aging population in Georgetown as a high impact on EMS. Sullivan went on to explain the segregation of 911 calls to Fire, Police and Emergency Medical. Sullivan then explained the budget from the early development of the plan to the March 2015 Council Decision to proceed with a City based EMS program. The budget planned for an initial $570 thousand deficit which included $700 thousand in revenue for the program that would begin in April 2015. Sullivan said that the March 2015 Council Decision was made with an analysis prepared on county support versus the City based EMS, calling for 6 additional paramedic firefighters with a July hire date, 4 TRVs with additional reserve units and a budget amendment for the incremental cost. Sullivan explained that the 2015/16 budget implemented the Full City EMS program with 15 paramedic firefighters. He said revenues were based on transport fees and established collection rates. Amended Revenues and Expenditures were shown next. Totals listed were Revenues of $2,234,000 and Expenditures of $1,890,772. Sullivan then provided a Financial Update and provided a Financial Analysis. He explained the operational impact for delayed collections. Sullivan said the actual year end deficit for operational start-up costs was $704,823 instead of the projected $570,000. Sullivan explained the Projection of Revenues. He said that the budget assumed over 4,200 transports by September 30, 2016. This projection is based on insurance type and specific pricing. Sullivan explained that this assumes accruals back for timing. He said that the $1.96 million dollar original projection has been amended for the additional call volume to $2.2 million dollars. Sullivan then showed a graph of Monthly Transports and Non - Transports from October 2015 through February 2016. He then provided slides on Transports by Age and a Medicare Profile. Sullivan cautioned that September 30th will have payments in arears. He said there are 6 month delays. June will be when the first month to show the October close out. Brainard asked if a non -transport is a positive outcome and inquired about revenue. Sullivan gave an example and an explanation. Brainard asked if non -transport is a higher collection rate than transports. Sullivan said they are still working on the logistics of the program. Sullivan said that there has been a 50% increase in call activity year after year. He explained that 25% of Texans are not insured. Since Georgetown's largest number of transports are over 65, they do have Medicare insurance. Gonzalez asked if calls that need nothing are tracked. Sullivan asked if he meant medical calls. Sullivan explained the blue bar in the chart and then explained that the brown bar represented treated but not transported patients. He explained that the area above the blue and brown displays represents those who have waived off help from the paramedics. He explained that this is generally about 10% to 15% of the calls, or a couple of calls per day. Gonzalez explained the importance of tracking the cost of trucks and staff. He said that it has a significant impact. Sullivan explained lift assist visits and that the department averages 2 to 3 lift assists per day. Gonzalez said he wants all lift assists tracked. Sullivan said he will be sharing all responses throughout the upcoming presentations. Eby asked what number of transports is needed in order to sustain the program. Sullivan said 12 transports per day or 360 per year. Gonzalez asked if the City has been able to identify why there is such a huge increase in calls. Brainard asked if the City is the one receiving the calls. Sullivan said the City is receiving the calls. Hesser asked if there was a bad flu recently that prompted the increase. Sullivan said he is not aware of a flu outbreak but that the increase has come mostly from fall calls. Gonzales said it does not make sense that the increases were so huge as soon as the City took over the system. Sullivan said it is being evaluated. Ross asked about the substantial increases in October, November and December. Brainard said it looks statistically improbable. Sullivan said this would be explained later in the presentation. Sullivan then showed the improved response times after the City took over the program. The graph showed comparisons of County Response and the City Responses. Average response times were shown for 2012 through 2016. This was followed by a slide showing percentages of First Unit Arrival times and Ambulance Arrival times. This was followed by a slide showing the 5 Year Trend of Average Response Times. Sullivan explained that 90% of all calls are responded to within 10 minutes. Fought said he would like to discuss the additional calls. He would like to examine 911 calls that the County responded to without notifying the City. Sullivan said he will look at these numbers. Fought asked how many calls were above a 15 minute response time. Fought said he is content with the analysis. Fought said sending two vehicles might not be needed. Sullivan said the process is not mature enough but will continue to improve. Fought said there needs to either be a plan to get there or the ability to admit that this is not how it was meant to be. He said he does not want Sullivan to be afraid to admit something that may need to be admitted. Ross asked about the less than 5 minute arrival time and when the clock starts ticking. Sullivan said time is counted from the moment the call is received. Ross said he finds it amazing that response time is less than 10 minutes 90% of the time. Sullivan said he is still looking at creating more efficiencies. He said sometimes a call that appears to be a fall call might have more complications such as a stroke or heart attack. Fought said he applauds the program for where it is at. Sullivan explained that some systems do not count all calls, just emergency calls. He then showed a chart of multiple calls all at the same time and explained that he was pleased that the City system could address all. Sullivan praised the high performing paramedics. Sullivan explained the slide titled Time is Muscle (Heart Muscle). He told of a call that resulted in door to balloon time of only 31 minutes. The standard is 60 minutes. The Fire Department has received a congratulatory letter from the surgeon involved, who praised the Georgetown EMS. Sullivan presented a slide on Medical Franchise Partners which displayed unscheduled calls, scheduled calls, post calls and 911 calls. He then showed a graph of trends of the times of day that people are most likely to need help because of an illness or emergency. Sullivan spoke on next steps and what the Fire Department is working on and explained 10 -digit # for stable patient transport requests. He spoke on the need for psychiatric emergencies to be handled at the right time, right place and in the right process. It is important that these transports are taken to the right facilities. Mayor Ross thanked Chief Sullivan. Ross reminded everyone that it is important to keep in mind that the systems developing here are for the long term and in the interest of providing world class service to the citizens. C. Update, information and possible feedback on the proposed schematic design for Downtown West — Eric Johnson, CIP Manager and Laurie Brewer, Assistant City Manager Eric Johnson, the City's Capital Improvement Project Manager for the Downtown West Project, provided the presentation of the schematic design for the proposed City Hall and Municipal Court. He introduced the Executive Design Team involved in the project, including Johnson, the Lawrence Group, Facilities Manager, Trish Long, Senior Planner, Jordan Maddox, and Assistant to the City Manager, Jack Daly. Johnson showed a schematic graph of the Downtown West Project. He provided a Program Diagram of City Hall. Johnson described the different areas and departments in detail. He then showed the specific Floor Plan. Councilmember Brainard asked about the two walls that were supposed to be removed. Johnson confirmed this and explained that there will still be room for future expansion. Gonzalez said he has no issues with the look of the expansion and asked about the jagged wall. He asked if it would not be better to design a straight up box, maximizing space now instead of later. Johnson said the current design is adding 3000 square feet to the building. Gonzalez said there is odd space. Johnson said it is actually a large space. Gonzalez said he would want to square out the wall at the City Attorney's office, making significant more space while costs are still lower. Brainard asked if a professional architect was hired. Johnson confirmed this to be true. Johnson then showed several perspective views of the outside of City Hall. He explained the front entry and the rotunda. He showed views of the back of the building, views of the sides of the building and spoke on the zig zag of the one wall. Jonrowe said she disagrees with Gonzalez and likes the structure as it is. Johnson showed the walkway from City Hall to the Council Chambers. Johnson described the location of the proposed mailroom and where the mailroom would have its own entry to the building. Johnson went on to provide the schematic map of the City Council Chambers and Municipal Court showing both the Program Diagram and the Floor Plan. He said that 3075 square feet will be used for Council Chambers and 1141 square feet for the lobby. Johnson described rooms and their placement in detail including the Teen Court Room. Johnson explained that room for expansion has been included. Brainard asked if additional parking had been provided. Johnson said additional parking is not provided at this building, but that a 144 space parking lot has been provided one block away. Ross asked how many seats were available for attendees at the current Council Chambers and how many could be seated at the new Council Chambers. Johnson answered that the number is 107 at the current Council Chambers and will be 174 at the new Council Chambers. Johnson said the Chambers is designed to have the ability to add additional seats and still meet the fire code. Jonrowe asked if citizens could go in the room allotted as a police room to speak to an officer. Johnson said this could only happen if invited and that the room is not intended for that type of use. Jonrowe said some citizens liked having access to the police officers when they used to be located downtown. She would like to make police officers accessible again. Gonzalez said that the room is more a room for an officer to get work done when he/she is in the area, and is not meant for staffing someone in there. Johnson said he will speak to Chief Nero. Johnson next showed the exterior of the Council Chambers building. He first showed several government buildings and their various appearances. He showed how the appearance can determine if a building is a court building or a council chambers. Johnson said it is important that people know where to enter the building. He then showed an aerial perspective view of the site plan, depicting green space between the buildings. Johnson showed the front door to City Hall leading directly to the Council Chambers. He explained that the road would not be closed, except for the possibility of special events. Johnson then showed the perspective view of the proposed new Municipal Court and Council Chambers building. He explained how it had a fairly modern look without being too modern. Johnson spoke on exterior finishes. He presented pictures of a pressed wood with zero maintenance and said that weather proofing is also behind the product. He then showed a cement fiber product, also a zero maintenance product. A night time view of the building was shown. Johnson ended with the Next Steps for the Project. He thanked Councilmembers John Hesser and Rachael Jonrowe for their contributions to the CMAR process. This will go to the City Council on April 12, 2016. Johnson said that the Appraisals and Project Budget would be brought to Council in Mid -Spring. The update of Design Documents and GMP would be brought to Council in the late summer. Johnson said that construction will begin fall of 2016. Gipson asked if the schematic works with the other buildings. He said he does not want the building to stick out like a sore thumb. Johnson explained how it ties in with the others buildings in the area. Johnson said it is important to soften the limestone because of being next to a residential neighborhood. Fought wanted to know why the City has exempted themselves from the usual HARC procedures and requirements. Ross said this will be blending the new while respecting the historic buildings. He explained that Council will get to look at this again before it proceeds. Hesser asked if this has been shown to the neighborhoods surrounding the proposed buildings. Ross asked when the neighbors would be met with. Jonrowe said the neighbors should be asked to vote on the materials and color schemes. Ross asked Johnson that this be done prior to being brought back to Council again. Mayor Ross recessed the meeting to Executive Session under Sections. 551.071, 551.072, 551.074 and 551.086 at 5.10 PM. Executive Session In compliance with the Open Meetings Act, Chapter 551, Government Code, Vernon's Texas Codes, Annotated, the items listed below will be discussed in closed session and are subject to action in the regular session. D. Sec. 551.071: Consultation with Attorney - Advice from attorney about pending or contemplated litigation and other matters on which the attorney has a duty to advise the City Council, including agenda items - Discussion regarding amendments to the purchase power agreement between the City and Buckthorn Westex - Discussion regarding various recent condemnation proceedings Sec. 551.072: Deliberation Regarding Real Property - Forwarded from the Georgetown Transportation Enhancement Corporation (GTEC): Consideration and possible action to approve the purchase of real property from Back Door Investments, LLC (Parcel 5, 306 Shannon Lane; Tenant: Charles & Teresa Howard), the payment of relocation benefits, and the subsequent payment of actual reasonable and customary moving expenses in compliance with the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, in connection with the Rivery Blvd. Extension Project - Forwarded from the Georgetown Transportation Enhancement Corporation (GTEC): Consideration and possible to approve the appraised values of real property to be acquired from the W.D. Kelley Foundation (Parcel 14) and David Wolf (Parcel 16) in connection with the Rivery Blvd. Extension Project Sec. 551.074: Personnel Matters - City Manager, City Attorney, City Secretary and Municipal Judge: Consideration of the appointment, employment, evaluation, reassignment, duties, discipline, or dismissal Sec. 551.086: Competitive Matters - Consideration and possible action regarding contract novation from JP Morgan to Mercuria - Sun Edison, PPA Adjournment Meeting was adjourned at 6:00 PM. Approved by the Georgetown City Council on I I D I �(O I Date (-�XL Dale Ross, Mayor J� Attest: City r tary Attract, hire, develop and retain the best people, and compensate them for the value they create Tactics: 1. Establish and consistently administer a competitive compensation program based on performance results a. Ensure funding of pay programs through budgetary priority b. Pay for results of employee's impact on business outcomes/operations c. Communicate the competiveness philosophy on salary range penetration and alignment of procedures d. Enhance employee recruitment e. Recruitment targeted to more diverse communities 2. Guide and Define Workplace Culture a. Finalize and Implement the City's core values program b. Rollout values that were developed in 2014/2015 grass roots campaign c. Market and reinforce values to our employees and workers through campaign 3. Implement the newly created employee training and development program a. Training for emerging leaders and mentoring, with an emphasis on succession planning b. Includes solid occupational training programs c. Includes professional development programs d. Networking opportunities and career path development e. Explore feasibility of establishing an employee tuition reimbursement program L Budget money for the upcoming year to begin program ii. Communicate and roll out the developed procedure and use as a recruitment and retention tool f. Continue to develop and promote Intern Program 4. Consistently communicate the current compensation and benefits plan to employees a. Conduct a feasibility study and assesses potential benefits of an employee health clinic b. Communicate the value of total compensation and benefits through annual total paycheck c. Communicate and promote the value of the TMRS retirement system d. Benchmark competitiveness of our benefits program and affordability e. Benchmark other cities' plan designs: tiers, deductibles, co -pays, etc. f. Continue to fund and improve upon the City's Wellness Program to ensure healthy employees g. Consider deferred compensation matching Page 22 of 105 Create a Customer Service Mindset Tactics 1. Develop and Implement a Customer Satisfaction Program a. Consistency in how information is gathered, shared and communicated b. Emphasize culture of public servants C. Establish a regular review of policies, procedures and forms with input from the users Per department ii. Include the review from 2 colleagues from other departments d. Encourage feedback from our stakeholders (e.g. Surveys and established performance measures) L Regular, institutionalized customer and employee satisfaction surveys (internal and external surveys) ii. Tag line for every email — Include in signature blocks "Please tell us how we are doing by..." and add link to survey website iii. Look through responses and follow-up iv. City-wide and specific department questions e. Improve, document and communicate internal processes f. Use data from Citizen survey to drive communication g. Formulate performance measures to gauge success 2. Create More Opportunities for Local Businesses to Do Business with the City a. Outreach Programs b. Assist local businesses through the procurement process C. Encourage departments to use local businesses 3. Provide Educational & Outreach Programs on City Department Functions & Activities a. Ongoing internal and external educational/outreach programs b. Engage local organizations to recruit City staff to present I. Board and Commission Education ii. "Lunch and Learn" Sessions (Internal and External) iii. Develop Speaker's Bureau for external requests for presentations iv. Library and Rec. Center info kiosks 4. Evaluate Creation of City-wide Customer Service Center a. Single point of contact b. Include both phone and web based Page 23 of 105 Implement the special event and destination strategy Tactics: 1. Create a Comprehensive Special Events Strategy a. Benchmarking with "Destination" Cities b. Clarify intended outcomes c. Develop criteria and performance measures for City -sponsored events i. Ensure quality over quantity ii. Acknowledge that all events reflect upon the City iii. Attendance Triggers (events drawing 500+ require notification and special event permit) d. Assess financial impact of special events (including cost to City) 2. Maintain and Promote Calendar of Special Events a. Advertise to citizens and visitors (iPad Kiosk, App Push notifications) b. Promote to locals c. Wrap city vehicles 3. Simplify Special Event Application a. Online Form b. Intuitive workflow 4. Cross -functional promotion and communication of city events a. Combine efforts to promote events b. Limit promotion to City events, Park Events, and Downtown Events c. Coordinate Downtown Events with DGA and Williamson Museum S. Activate area beyond direct square a. Small performance area in Downtown West I. Understand impact on neighbors ii. Visibility from Square b. Address narrative regarding impact of special events on downtown merchants and neighborhood c. Strive for continually improving events (assessments) 6. Explore Feasibility of a Special Event Coordinator a. Oversight for Downtown, Garey Park, San Gabriel Park b. Develop corporate sponsorship plan Page 24 of 105 Build and maintain an entertainment platform/venues Tactics: 1. Build and Program City -owned Venues a) Garey Park i. Finish in 2018, including Amphitheater b) San Gabriel Master Plan L Program for Festival/Event Area (17 acres of flexible space) ii. Short-term strategy iii. "Crawl" before area is fully developed to vet needs iv. Staff member assigned to programming v. Short-term "trial" events vi. Events drive space design going forward vii. Long-term strategy driven by rodeo arena (lease up 2017) and show barn lease c) Downtown West Park Space i. Patio outside Red Poppy Coffee Co. ii. Shade, seating, power, and amplification options neighborhoods) iii. Connections to Downtown iv. Ensure visibility v. Sidewalks vi. Small events (cognizant of impact on vii. Will not close streets permanently viii. Shade ix. Activate alley between Library and Planning Department x. Public Art 2. Citywide Space Inventory and Needs Assessment a) Inventory existing event space throughout the City b) Include rules, costs, capacity, future plans c) Distinguish between public and private ownership d) Photos of event space (especially of spaces in use) e) Include wedding venues f) Annual review and update (currently 80% complete) i. Outreach to arts/culture organizations and nonprofits to get feedback about performance venue needs (Identify gaps and continue on-going coordination with stakeholders) g) City becomes landing page for event planning 3. Cross -Functional Team to Review and Promote City Events a) Inventory of ALL City -owned events (Library, Parks, CVB, Main Street b) Education on current initiatives Page 25 of 105 c) Coordinated special event planning d) Cross -marketing 4. Activate space a) Create natural gathering spaces b) More green space in dense areas (e.g. Founders Park, 8th Street Courtyard) sidewalks or ROW) c) Sunday activities i. Sidewalk cafes (Facilitate easy use of Page 26 of 105 Expand and diversify the tax base (increase commercial percentage) Tactics: 1. Create and maintain a positive relationship with the business community through a Business Retention Program a. Identify opportunities and constraints facing existing businesses and prepare a report for Council on business relations and recommendations. 2. Conduct studies to develop meaningful data to drive the City's E.D. program a. Retail Strategic Plan — Determine retail gaps, best sites, and recruitment opportunities. b. Economic Base Analysis — Assess conditions and trends impacting Georgetown, profile Georgetown's economic base and real estate/land use inventory, and prepare a forecast of future employment and building space demand. 3. Develop a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategic Plan a. Complete a strategic plan that provides an assessment of the existing conditions that drive Georgetown's economy and provides implementation strategies that will enhance the business climate, strengthen the fiscal health, and support economic growth of the City. b. Proactively attract, expand and retain targeted retail and employment businesses using the City's studies as resources. c. Craft an economic development incentive policy. 4. Develop a process to understand the fiscal impact and trade-off of land use decisions a. Conduct a Fiscal Impact model b. Conduct a Cost -to -Serve model c. Utilize the models to educate staff, elected officials and other stakeholders on the impacts of development. 5. Update the City's Comprehensive Plan and Capital Improvement Plans to align resources and preserve opportunities for retail and employment growth a. Align the City's Comprehensive Plan, including the land use and transportation elements, with the retail and primary employment studies. b. Identify action plans to make "shovel ready" the top locations for retail and primary employment. Page 27 of 105 Accumulate funds to account for unfunded and unanticipated liabilities Tactics: 1. Ensure Financial and Budgetary Policy Addresses Liabilities a. Insurance targets (insured against disasters) b. Targeted fund balances for risk mitigation (rainy day funds) c. Targeted Unfunded Actuarial Accrued Liability (UAAL) level on retirement plan (the amount of retirement that is owed to an employee in future years that exceed current assets and their projected growth) d. Ensure authority is delegated to City Manager where appropriated to ensure efficiency, but maintain internal control 2. Update quarterly financial report to include a list of City -Wide liabilities, and an update on the balance in the Council Discretionary Fund 3. Incorporate O&M costs in planning of capital projects 4. Implement a Policy and Phase -In Approach for an Economic Uncertainty Fund to Address Short-term Revenue Declines S. Develop comprehensive facilities master plan and funding strategy for key facility replacements Page 28 of 105 Create a strategy to increase mobility Tactics: 1. Complete review and propose amendments for the Unified Development Code (UDC Chapter 12 Pedestrian and Vehicle Circulation) related to development standards to ensure they are designed to improve mobility efforts within and between new developments a. Ensure that development is providing its share of the comprehensive planned network of streets, sidewalks and regional trails. b. Trail Dedication c. Street Design d. Neighborhood Design e. Connectivity 2. Continue to develop and implement existing transportation plans a. Sidewalk Master Plan b. Overall Transportation Plan 3. Develop and implement new and updated plans a. Transit Development Plan b. Airport Master Plan c. Bike Master Plan 4. Conduct a feasibility study of a control center for traffic operations and signal coordination S. Continue to adequately fund transportation infrastructure 6. Continue to address maintenance of existing infrastructure a. Develop funding strategies that are proportional to the actual growth in the transportation network/system b. Continue to seek out alternative state and federal funding sources Page 29 of 105 Attain and maintain superior public safety and enhance the perception of safety Tactics: 1. Fire Department attain Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) accreditation AND Police Department attain Texas Police Chiefs Association (TPCA) recognition 2. Achieve and consistently be one of the top -tier public safety agencies to work for within central Texas. Progressive development practices and outcomes (professional development) b. Attain and retain high caliber public safety professionals through competitive compensation and ensuring public safety personal are equipped to do their job effectively c. Develop performance measures (e.g. response times and case closure rates), including measure to evaluate communication and community engagement Page 30 of 105 Attract younger workers/young professionals to the Community Tactics: 1. Tailor branding and communications towards young professionals a. Coordinated branding and co -marketing between departments b. Citizen Survey Data to drive communication style for key demographics c. Employee survey data to see why a % of employees live outside the City d. Advertise and Promote to key Demographics I. Outdoor amenities (hike & bike trail, disc golf, Garey Park, San Gabriel Park, etc.) ii. Proximity to Austin, reverse commute iii. 100% renewable energy iv. Low -tax rate 2. Improve Social Environment for Young Professionals (25-44) a. Enhance Retail and Entertainment Offerings I. Businesses open later ii. Outlets for young families iii. Expand locations of "yuppie friendly" restaurants in and beyond current development nodes (e.g. Downtown, Wolf Ranch, 1-35) iv. Pet Friendly community (e.g. dogs allowed on patios) b. Increase events that appeal to key demographics (e.g. specific live music choices) C. Foster Development of Young -Professional Networking Groups Page 31 of 105 Improve communications and advertising Tactics: 1. Gain clarity on the City organization's branding strategy a. Once identity/vision/mission has been clarified, coordinate a diverse team of city employees to evaluate the City's brand elements, including the G logo, Most Beautiful Town Square trademark, 100% renewable logo, etc. 2. Work to create consistency in messages and themes for communications and marketing across the City. a. Restart the Communications Team to lead the coordination of messages and marketing for the City and ensure that they are aligned with the City's identity, vision, and mission. b. Share best practices for communications and marketing. c. Conduct training for departments in marketing and communications processes, social media, video production, graphics, news writing, and website content creation. 3. Assess department resources and make needed adjustments to ensure capacity to generate and sustain communications and marketing content across multiple platforms. a. Create communications ambassadors who are trained in and empowered to create communications and marketing content. 4. Assess and enhance existing City-wide logo, design, graphics, and presentation guidelines. Page 32 of 105 Create and maintain outstanding aesthetics, and a welcoming appearance and spirit Tactics: 1. Identify, Review, and Enhance Development Standards Related to Beautification a. Clarify beautification standards for public development and private development b. Identify Gateways and Future Gateways c. Develop Gateway Design Guidelines to govern public and private improvement (including future gateways) d. Continue to restrict Height Limits on 1-35 related to signage and billboards AND Maintain Courthouse view corridor e. Amend TIRZs to include beautification (South, Williams, Rivery, and Downtown) f. Consistent Park Standards for new developments g. Review opportunities to improve aesthetics and development where appropriate 2. Clarify and Understand Costs Associated with Beautification and Secure Funding (including appropriations, grants, volunteers, etc.) a. Keep Georgetown Beautiful program and/or Adopt a Highway program b. Increase Transportation ROW Maintenance Budget (with corresponding performance measures) c. Set aside percentage of capital budgets to "Beautification" (e.g. 1% for Public Art administered by Arts and Culture tied to facility CIP) d. Promote "signature investments" with capital improvements (e.g. win awards) e. Alternative Funding Strategies: f. Road improvement districts g. Street Maintenance Fee h. Gateway CIP Budget 3. Continue and Increase Stewardship of all Public Rights-of-way (Including TxDOT) a. Continue Transportation's street sweeping efforts (2 full-time sweepers) b. TXDOT Right-of-way Maintenance and Signage c. Brown "Historic District" Sign on 1-35 d. Renegotiate Maintenance MOU with TxDOT (1968) e. Williams, University, and Leander Beautification f. Beyond Mowing (include landscaping) g. Texture, Signage, Art h. Mast Arms and Powder Coating I. Buy -in for developing medians (aka blocking driveway access) j. Realize cost to retrofit and impact to business owners Page 33 of 105 4. Enhance Community Branding at Key Points Within the City a. Build southbound (northern) Monument Signage b. Revisit motto, branding, tagline on public improvements c. Signature street signs and branding d. Keep Southbound Billboard (apprise Council of updates) Page 34 of 105 Create an asset maintenance and revitalization plan Tactics: 1. Develop a uniform asset management and work order process a. Process development requires cross -departmental team b. Consider what assets go into system c. Inventory (to include condition) of assets d. Assess "Worst of Breed" vs. `Best of Breed" e. Define parameters of maintenance strategy (preventive, corrective) f. Define replacement strategy (relates to service level) g. Maintenance Plan includes preventive maintenance tasks, frequency, insource/outsource, etc. h. Define system to manage assets (e.g. EAM Infor) L Deliverable to be uniform (tool to measure status across departments) 2. Develop baseline annual costs to operate and maintain (annual budget) a. What do we have? b. What is an asset? c. What are our service levels? d. What is our maintenance plan? e. System used to track/schedule? 3. Define impact of operation and maintenance (O&M) when Capital additions and replacements are approved/added a. Research benchmarks for asset additions b. Ensure compliance with a Master Plan c. Update frequency of a plan d. Develop thumb -rules for capital additions 4. Clarify Capital Retirement/Replacement Strategy a. Understand Capital assets must be replaced over time b. Strategies on when to retire/replace capital assets c. Funding strategy for capital replacements Page 35 of 105 Create a "Donut Hole" strategy Tactics: Council Strategy — Create Comprehensive Annexation Strategy 1. Create a Broad -Based Annexation Plan with Alignment to the 2030 Plan a. Donut hole plan one of several subsets to larger annexation strategy b. Strategic goals/policies/tactics c. Prioritization/Ranking of Areas i. Financial (cost to City) ii. Potential for long-term growth/revenue iii. Public Safety iv. Equitable distribution of services/taxes d. Solidify funding source if costs associated e. Annexation a key piece of the City's Long -Range Planning Efforts f. Ensure that other long-range plans align with and support annexation strategy g. Adopt a Future Annexation Map and Strategic Plan as element of 2030 Plan 2. Effectively Communicate Planning Efforts and Outcomes a. Orientation/Education for City Council i. Staff to provide guidance, recommendations b. Gauge Council philosophy, priorities, desired criteria c. Partner early with neighborhoods considered for annexation d. Signal to general public and other governmental entities timing of potential annexations e. Promote annexation is positive light Page 36 of 105 Monitor, promote, and communicate a long-term water and utilities plan and strategy Tactics: 1) Implement and Monitor the Integrated Resource Plan 2) Develop and Execute a communication and marketing strategy for customers relating to the resource plan a. Regularly report and revisit electric and water plans b. Tie utility marketing strategy to broader City branding c. Emphasize education regarding the Region G Water Plan Page 37 of. 105