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06 - Community ServicesCommunity% ,services�5 Airport Page 106 Animal Services Page 108 General Government Contracts Page 104 Public Library Page 110 Sanitation Page 114 COMMUNITY SERVICES - The Community Services Division consists of departments andprograms which provide basic municipal services for residents and businesses. City departments included in the Division are: the Airport, Animal Services, Collection Station, and Public Library. The Division also manages and coordinates the sanitation contract (solid waste services, recycling and bulky waste pick-up); the Teen Court Program; housing assistance contracts; provides support for affordable housing planning; and administers contracts for health and social services. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Administration 145,522 181,877 177,828 201,835 196,835 General Government Contracts 164,867 235,664 235,664 252,113 191,113 Airport 625,034 1,009,823 1,007,635 1,117,580 1,052,580 Animal Services 213,514 247,350 247,349 290,903 290,903 Collection Station 136,302 135,539 135,538 132,894 132,894 Sanitation Contracts 1,659,149 1,803,060 1,857,866 2,305,985 2,390,956 Library 745,014 795,217 794,103 830,361 830,361 Library Donations 36,595 40,000 40,000 54,644 21,100 Subtotal - Operations 3,725,997 4,448,530 4,495,983 5,186,315 5,106,742 Other Airport Capital Projects 1,608,389 852,653 354,607 246,000 10,000 Interfund Nondept'1 Charge 1,033,714 1,101,207 1,101,207 1,124,389 1,124,389 Division Total 6,368,100 6,402,390 5,951,797 6,556,704 6,241,131 COMMUNITY SERVICES -- ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 95 COMMUNITY SERVICES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 16 Library 2.5 Administration 33.25 Total Employees n Station 6.25 Airport vices Personnel, Operations, & Capital Capital operations Total Budget $6,556,704 COMMUNITY SERVICES 96 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDS & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. Means (99-04) Sponsor the Red Poppy Festival to help promote the unique character of Georgetown, especially its downtown historical district. (All Divisions) Environmental and Resources Conservation Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development Focus End 2.02 Wildlife is conserved. Means (99-01) Develop an educational program regarding wildlife habitat and coexistence issues. (Animal Services) Growth and Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. Means (98-04) Assist in location and design of City facilities identified in the citywide 10 -year plan to ensure that those facilities contribute to the health of the central business district, promote efficient and safe City operations, improve access by citizens and exemplify urban design standards. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Economic Development, Finance and Administration) Means (00-05) Support other Divisions in developing a strategy to address the Geographic Information System (GIS) needs of the City. (Administration, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance and Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 97 Health and Human Services Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human: services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-01) Coordinate with Williamson County and Cities Health District and the Georgetown Project on the development of a community needs assessment. (Administration) Means (99-04) Promote all Georgetown children through public fire education, Risk Watch Safety programs, and attend neighborhood block parties that strengthen youth and families, community partnerships, and neighborhood activities. (Administration -General Government Contracts, Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services, Parks and Recreation and Police Services) Means (00-01) Conduct a City-wide analysis of in-kind and cash contributions for social services. (All Departments, All Divisions) Means (01-02) Develop contracts for social services as determined by City Council. (Administration - General Government Contracts) Housing Policy End 6 00 All citizens have access to safe and adequate housing opportunities. Means (99-01) Develop implementation strategies for housing policies, in conjunction with Development Services. (Administration, Development Services, Management Services) Public Information and Education Policy End 7.0 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (99-01) Participate in the City's public information and awareness team. (All Divisions) Means (00-05) Coordinate with Parks and Recreation to develop recreation related programs foryouth at the Library. (Public Library, Parks & Recreation) Means (00-05) Develop Animal Safety and Humane Education Programs to use in Georgetown Elementary Schools and elsewhere. (Animal Services) Means (00-05) Recruit volunteers through Georgetown Information and Volunteer Program (GIVE) for city and community projects and services. (Administration, Public Library, Management Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) COMMUNITY SERVICES 98 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (00-05) Provide regular children's library programs that emphasize creative activities, reading for pleasure, positive values, and cultural competence. (Public Library) Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens Means (00-01) Increase the number of Town Hall meetings to provide for structured and public citizen input and feedback regarding municipal operations and issues. (All Divisions) Means (00-05) Provide services to special needs populations and to residents unable to visit the Public Library building. (Public Library) Public Safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Means (98-04) Conduct a needs assessment of hazardous materials using Chemical Manufacturing Association data in order to provide hazardous analysis planning and emergency response information for public safety employees. (Sanitation, Community Owned Utilities, Finance and Administration, Fire Services, Management Services) Focus End 8.03 Citizens are safe from animal threat. Means (99-01) Promote compliance with rabies vaccination requirements by developing and implementing a pet licensing campaign. (Animal Services) Focus End 8.03.01 The City provides humane animal accommodations. Means (98-03) Assist in location, design and construction of a new Animal Shelter, identified in the city- wide ten-year plan, to ensure that the facility promotes efficient and safe city operations, improves access by citizens and exemplifies urban design standards. (Animal Services, Finance and Administration, Management Services) Recreational and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open: space and recreation facilities and services contribute to an enhanced quality of life for citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. Means (97-02) Provide exhibit space for art by members of the Williamson County Art Guild. (Public Library) Means (99-01) Expand the volunteer Dog Walking Program in which citizens can "borrow" a dog from the Animal Shelter to walk or run on the various trails. (Animal Services) COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 99 Means (00-05) Work with the Parks and Recreation Division to coordinate and promote programs for children. (Public Library, Parks & Recreation) Transportation Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Focus End 10.01 The Georgetown Municipal Airport primarily serves the general aviation needs of the community. Means (99-04) Continue to pursue means to obtain an air traffic control tower to improve airport safety and efficiency. (Airport) Means (00-01) Complete construction of new/remodeled Airport Terminal Building. (Airport, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (00-01) Continue to pursue means for obtaining a jet engine "hush house" from the City of Austin to reduce noise from jet engine maintenance run -ups. (Airport) Means (00-01) Complete Federal Aviation Administration Part 150 Noise Study. (Airport) Utilities/Energy Policy End 1200 City owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Means (99-02) Promote and provide public education and information to encourage recycling and the reduction of solid waste. (Administration) Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (98-03) Work with Management Services, Development Services and Community Owned Utilities for the enforcement to nuisance codes and ordinances and for the removal of sub -standard structures. (Sanitation, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Management Services) Means (99-01) Assist Information Resources in the coordination, implementation, and automation of the code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (All Departments, All Divisions) COMMUNITY SERVICES 100 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (99-01) Revise the code enforcement process to implement a one-stop calling point and provide more aggressive identification and abatement of violations. (All Departments, All Divisions) Facilities and Services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Means (99-02) Develop and implement individualized career development and citywide succession plans. (All Divisions) Finance Policy End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future need are provided Means (00-01) Conduct a citywide competitive fee analysis. (All Divisions) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 101 i� WHAT WE DO: The Community Services Administration department supervises and provides administrative support for all departments of the division including the Municipal Airport, Animal Services, Collection Station and Public Library. Community Services Administration also: • manages sanitation and recycling contracts; • develops and manages housing grant applications; • monitors City contracts and leases with health, welfare, and community service agencies; • coordinates the Teen Court Program; • coordinates with Georgetown Project on children and youth issues. • serves as a resource for the new Economic Development Division. Community Services Administration supports and coordinates a variety of community project activities, and serves as the City's liaison to social services organizations and providers. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • • • 102 Planned and implemented community and neighborhood clean-up events in the fall and spring. Served on the Williamson County and Cities Hazardous Household Waste Coalition, to plan and promote the annual collection day event held April 29, 2000, with over 800 households participating. Coordinated work of a Council -appointed citizen's committee in the development of a housing policy plan and implementation strategy, to address issues including affordability, manufactured homes, sale of City property for housing, and infill development. • Implemented improvements for Teen Court Program, including the selection of teen attorneys through interviews, establishment of a partnership with Georgetown Information and Volunteer Exchange for service placements, and improved recognition programs for participants. • Conducted a review of the Collection Station services and fees, and implemented changes to address code enforcement problems throughout the City. • Conducted a review of performance standards and pay for contracted sanitation services, to develop and implement performance based pay incentives to ensure quality services. • Developed and implemented a funding application system for contracted Social Services. • Developed a strategy to implement recommendations of the Council -appointed Economic Development Task Force, creating a new Division for Economic Development. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Transition the Convention and Visitors Bureau and Main Street Program to a new Economic Development Division. • Implement strategies for development of affordable housing, based upon citizens committee plans. • Assess Sanitation service fees and investigate possibility of establishing a transfer station for trash collection. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTNiTY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) Teen Court cases 80 60 100 75 80 2) Garbage and/or recycling 70,879 (43.4%) 65,879 (-7.1%) 145,522 181,877 177,828 201,835 (13.5%) 196,835 (-2.5%) calls for information* 2,600 1,000 500 300 300 3) Contracts monitored 10 10 10 10 10 * See `Significant Changes"below. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 2/0 2.5/0 2/0.5 # Employees 2/0.5 2/0.5 104,771 128,802 128,389 Personnel 130,956 (2.0%) 130,956 (o.o%) 40,751 53,075 49,439 Operations 70,879 (43.4%) 65,879 (-7.1%) 145,522 181,877 177,828 201,835 (13.5%) 196,835 (-2.5%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/011'roposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed ,SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The change in solid waste contractors, effective October 1, 1998, has made a difference in the number of calls City Community Services Administration receives from customers. Once the transition was complete for this change, calls and complaints decreased and have continued to do so. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 103 WHAT WE DO: This department accounts for the City's social and community service commitments, which are not specific to an individual department or fund, and is staffed by Community Services Administration. Maintenance of four community buildings, direct cash contributions, and utility subsidies for local social service organizations, supported by the City, are budgeted in this department. Administrative allocations for services received from other City funds are also budgeted in this department. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Developed contracts and provided funding for services delivered through non-profit agencies: • $70,000 for the Georgetown Project • $35,000 for the Williamson County & Cities Health District • $12,000 for the Stonehaven Senior Center • $10,000 for the Williamson -Burnet County Opportunities (WBCO) Crisis Center • $10,000 for the Georgetown Information & Volunteer Exchange • $7,500 for CARTS Transportation • $5,000 for WBCO Nutrition Program • $2,500 for the Literacy Council of Williamson County • $1,000 for the Hispanic Parents in Action • Funded facility maintenance, utilities and/or landscaping services for WBCO Head Start and A Madella Hilliard Community Center. • Developed a social services funding application process. 104 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Develop contracts for services to be provided by non-profit agencies. • Conduct an analysis of City contributions (staff, in- kind, services, and funding) provided to support community social services. • Prepare agreements for lease of City buildings and property maintenance arrangements. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 105 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 8,673 8,664 8,664 Facilities Maintenance 5,363 (-38.1%) 5,363 (0.0%) 80,500 84,000 84,000 Lease & Contracts 103,750 (23.5%) 42,750 (-58.8%) 62,787 130,000 130,000 Special Svc & Legal 130,000 (0.0%) 130,000 (0.0%) 12,907 13,000 13,000 Utilities 13,000 (0.0%) 13,000 (o.o%) 164,867 235,664 235,664 Subtotal - Department 252,113 (7.0%) 191,113 (-24.2%) 1,033,714 1,101,207 1,101,207 IntfdNondept'1Chrg 1,124,389 (2.1%) 1,124,389 (0.0%) 1,198,581 1,336,871 1,336,871 Subtotal - Department 1,376,502 (3.0%) 1,315,502 (-4.4^io) * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 105 WHAT WE DO: The Airport Department is responsible for the day-to- day operations and maintenance of the Georgetown Municipal Airport. These activities include the supervision of fuel sales concessions, monitoring the leases for City -owned facilities, and the supervision of the grounds maintenance. All of the above must be in compliance with state and federal rules and regulations. In addition, the Department provides support to the Airport Advisory Board. An Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) and a Remote Transmitter/Receiver Outlet (RTR-O) are located on the field to provide continuous weather information and clearance delivery services to the pilots. The UNICOM ground -to -air and air -to -ground radio is operated from 7:00 a.m. until dark, seven days week, at a frequency of 123.0. The runways are open to air traffic 24 hours a day, seven days a week at an elevation of 789 feet. The main runway, 18-36, is 5,000 feet long x 100 feet wide, lighted from dusk to dawn. The crosswind runway, 11- 29, is 4,100 feet long x 75 feet wide. The lights are radio controlled at the UNICOM frequency of 123.0, and five clicks of the microphone. The Airport owns and leases two large group hangars to Ican Aviation and Currey Aviation, leases 30 tiedown spaces and 113 T -Hangar spaces, and leases one small building to the Civil Air Patrol. Twelve tiedown spaces are reserved for the temporary, overnight visitors to the Airport. The Airport operates as an Enterprise Fund and is totally self-supporting. All expenditures are paid for with Airport revenues, and no general fund (city tax dollars) monies are spent on the Airport. The Department also purchases and sells aviation fuel (aviation gasoline and jet fuel), operates the UNICOM radio, relaying accurate, up-to-date weather information to pilots, and monitors and records the weather broadcasts from the Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS). Six part-time fuel attendants, one part-time bookkeeper, and one full-time 106 grounds maintenance worker operate this department under the direction of the Airport Manager. WHAT WE ACCOtiIPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Provided support for the 14th Annual Airshow. • Completed utility lines for upgraded services to the terminal building. • Started construction on a new/remodeled terminal building. • Completed construction of 62 new T -Hangar spaces. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Complete construction of the new/remodeled terminal Building. • Rehab the roof on T -Hangar C. • Repair north access Ramp to Hangar D. • Begin Federal Aviation Administration Part 150 Noise Study Program. • Continue to pursue inclusion in the FAA airtraffic contract control tower. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Gallons of jet fuel sold 149,382 140,000 155,000 277,100 300,000 2) Gallons of AvGas sold 151,870 160,000 165,000 257,846 275,000 3) Number of based aircraft 133 150 185 268 300 4) T -Hangar occupancy rate 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 2/3.25 2/4.25 2/4.25 # Employees 2/4.25 2/4.25 151,134 157,584 155,396 Personnel 163,231 (5.0%) 163,231 (0.0%) 473,900 852,239 852,239 Operations 954,349 (12.0%) 889,349 (-6.8%) 1,608,389 852,653 354,607 Capital 246,000 (-30.6%) 10,000 (-95.9%) 2,233,423 1,862,476 1,362,242 1,363,580 (0.1%) 1,062,580 (-22.1%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Additional hours for part time fuel attendants were added in 1999/00 to handle the increase in fuel sales. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 107 WHAT WE DO: Animal Services is committed to providing excellent customer service, protecting the health and safety of all people in Georgetown from animal nuisances and hazards, and providing healthy and humane care and treatment for animals. The Department provides counseling and information on responsible pet ownership, and nuisance and pest control. Animal Services enforces City Codes relating to animals --most commonly the "leash law" for dogs. The Department assists law enforcement agencies in enforcing State laws relating to animals (Cruelty to Animals, etc.) Animal Services provides shelter for stray and homeless pets, reunites lost pets with their owners and finds homes for homeless cats and dogs through a comprehensive Adoption Program. The Pet License Program provides identification of lost pets 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and gives owners of licensed pets a "Free Ride" (no impoundment fees) for impounded pets. Licensing is done through the mail, at local Veterinary Clinics, and at the Animal Shelter. A primary responsibility is protecting people in Georgetown from the threat of rabies. This is accomplished through enforcement of vaccination requirements for dogs and cats, quarantining and testing of animals that bite people, and educating people to respect wildlife and avoid handling wild animals. Officers patrol the City seven days a week, responding to a variety of calls for service and are on call 24 hours a day for emergencies involving animals. Animal Services sponsors quarterly low cost Rabies Vaccination Clinics, and provides information and assistance for pet neutering in order to help alleviate the pet overpopulation problems in Georgetown. The Department utilizes volunteers and staff in doing "off- site" adoptions at various places around Georgetown and in nearby cities, thereby reducing the numbers of pets destroyed. The Department provides residents with cages and traps to control animal nuisances. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Decreased the number of animals killed in the Animal Shelter by approximately 30%, even 108 though that number had remained almost constant for the last four years. • Increased the number of pets adopted from the Animal Shelter by approximately 20%, mainly through off-site adoption outreach programs staffed mainly by volunteers. • Decreased the number of animals impounded into the Animal Shelter by approximately 10% through encouraging spay/neuter programs to alleviate pet overpopulation and through proactive counseling and educating pet owners in responsible pet care. • Enhanced Animal Services customer service by moving into a new office trailer providing an indoor lobby for customers and office space for staff. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Implement an Animal Safety and Humane Education program to be taught in Georgetown Elementary Schools and elsewhere. • Expand the Animal Shelter's adoption program by increasing our volunteer base. • Become less dependent on transfer programs and take a leading role in pet adoptions in Williamson County. • Develop strategies to work toward no adoptable pets being killed in Georgetown Animal Shelters. • Expand Animal Services capabilities in investigating animal abuse and neglect and taking action in such cases by having an Animal Services Officer become a Certified Animal Cruelty Investigator. • Increase data management efficiency and capabilities by adding another computer to the Animal Services office, allowing staff to look up animal licenses, rabies vacanations and other information more quickly. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTrviTY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 Actual Budget Actual 1) Service calls 3,010 2,888 3,500 3,100 3,400 2) Animals impounded 1,691 1,706 2,100 1,566 1,900 3) Incoming phone calls 7,108 7,518 7,500 7,900 8,000 4) Animals euthanized 478 441 450 316 320 5) Animals Adopted 327 449 560 544 600 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Animal Services staff moved into more adequate temporary office space awaiting construction of a new animal shelter facility. An office trailer was leased and set up at the existing Animal Shelter site, and as a result this move also allowed for an expansion of the space for cats into the old, small office. This expansion now provides a separate space for observation of incoming cats, and cats with illnesses can be housed apart from healthy animals. A part time shelter attendant will be upgraded to full time to provide expanded services at the Animal Shelter. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 109 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 5.25/.5 6/0 6/0 # Employees 6.5/0 6.5/0 172,974 195,038 195,037 Personnel 215,633 (10.6%) 215,633 (0.0%) 39,095 52,312 52,312 Operations 75,270 (43.9%) 75,270 (0.0%) 1,445 0 0 Capital 0 (N/A) 0 (N/A) 213,514 247,350 247,349 290,903 (17.6%) 290,903 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time F FE's * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Animal Services staff moved into more adequate temporary office space awaiting construction of a new animal shelter facility. An office trailer was leased and set up at the existing Animal Shelter site, and as a result this move also allowed for an expansion of the space for cats into the old, small office. This expansion now provides a separate space for observation of incoming cats, and cats with illnesses can be housed apart from healthy animals. A part time shelter attendant will be upgraded to full time to provide expanded services at the Animal Shelter. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 109 WHAT WE DO: The Georgetown Public Library houses and administers a collection of more than 70,000 items including popular fiction and non-fiction, classics, large -print, reference, books -on -cassette, videos, literacy, Spanish-language, newspapers, magazines, CD-ROM programs, and youth and children's materials, to meet the life-long learning and reading interests of Library users. Weekly story hours, a summer reading program, reference services, and public access to the Internet are among many library services provided by staff without cost to the public. Under a reciprocal borrowing agreement, library users who hold current library cards can check out materials from the Round Rock Library, or use the inter -library loan service to borrow materials for a small cost from other Texas libraries. Meeting room space is available for Literacy Council tutoring sessions and for organizations with educational aims. The Georgetown Public Library works in concert with other community organizations, i.e. Georgetown Project and Georgetown Independent School District, and the Assistance League of the Georgetown Area, in an effort to provide solutions, within programming, to social and educational concerns. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Added 744 linear feet of shelving though grants from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the Georgetown Library Foundation. • Installed security cameras inside and outside the library. • Began a new volunteer program with the assistance of the revitalized Friends of the Library organization. • Received professional advice about more effective utilization of library space and began making changes to create more work space for the staff. 110 • Began grant process to acquire from the Gates Foundations four new computers to use for public Internet access. • Received Texas Book Festival Award in the amount of $1,500 to replace adult science books that were damaged when the roof leaked. • Produced, through the donated services of Communication Arts Multimedia, Inc., a video to use for library fund=raising. • Expanded our collection to include music CDs through donations from the United Way. • Added the Williamson County Sun to our microfilm collection through a grant from the Georgetown Library Foundation. • Responding to patron requests, and through a grant from the United Way, purchased a free- standing outdoor book return, which is located adjacent to the parking lot. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Add four public access Internet terminals, to meet public demand. • Rearrange library space to operate more efficiently and to make room for additional equipment. • Strengthen relations among the Library Advisory Board, the Georgetown Library Foundation, and the Friends of the Georgetown Library. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Circulation 220,430 240,4319 260,000 270,000 295,000 2) Registrations, new patron 3,006 1,836* 2,500 2,000 2,200 3) Books added per year 11,517 12,000 13,000 11,000*** 12,000**** 4) Children's program attendance 8,672** 9,014 16,000 11,000 16,000 * 97/98 statistics reflect large increases due to initiation of GISD student card (Kid's cards) program. By 98199, most students were registered. ** During 1998, the summer reading program activities were heldat the Community Center, which offered more space than the library meeting room. However, attendance fell off. In an effort to regain our previous high attendance rates, during the summers of 1999 and 2000 the activities are being held at the library. 830,361 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's *** The Library was without a catalogerfor three months, so bookprocessing slowed down. * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual **** Since our book budget will not be increased in 2000101, the number of books added will level off. ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 10/6.25 10/6.25 10/6.25 it Employees 11/5 11/5 451,827 483,881 482,767 Personnel 518,189 (7.3%) 518,189 (0.0%) 214,813 212,274 212,274 Operations 213,110 (0.4%) 213,110 (0.0%) 78,374 99,062 99,062 Capital 99,062 (0.0%) 99,062 (0.0%) 745,014 795,217 794,103 830,361 (4.6%) 830,361 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 l LIBRARY -- RESTRICTED DONATIONS This fund receives and holds grants and donations received from library patrons, the Georgetown Library Foundation, and from other sources. Funds are used to purchase materials specified by the donor or selected by the staff. The Public Library receives materials and services funded through the Central Texas Library System, one of ten cooperative library systems in Texas that distributes state funds to public libraries. The amount of materials received is based in part on the population of the City of Georgetown and on the amount of local funds spent on the Public Library. 99100 00/01 01/02 98199 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 16,850 17,206 26,586 33,544 0 REVENUES: Donations 27,340 26,000 1,600 1,100 1,100 Interest & Other 4,515 1,100 27,000 20,000 20,000 Grants 14,476 18,358 Total Revenues 46,331 27,100 46,958 21,100 21,100 EXPENSES: Parks, Library & Recreation 36,595 Community Services 40,000 40,000 54,644 21,100 Total Expenses 36,595 40,000 40,000 54,644 21,100 Ending Fund Balance 26,586 4,306 33,544 0 0 COMMUNITY SERVICES 112 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00< GE�RG�T 01 yz This page intentionally left blank COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 113 WHAT WE DO: Sanitation funds, expended in this department, are paid to the solid waste contractor (Texas Disposal Systems) for services to residential and commercial customers. The Contractor provides all curbside garbage and recycling pickup for City customers. Charges for the Joint Services Fund allocations are also included. Additionally, this department funds the City's pro -rata share of the Household Hazardous Waste Clean-up Day for Williamson County. Oversight responsibilities and monitoring of these services are conducted by Community Services Administration. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Analyzed services and revised the contract which includes service quality and customer satisfaction measures, and a plan for contractor payments based upon successful performance as compared against these measures. • Conducted a customer survey, to determine citizen opinions about the service fees and what performance issues are most important. • Conducted, with the Collection Station, fall and spring neighborhood clean up efforts to remove bulky waste and brush from areas identified by Code Enforcement staff as most critical and in need of extra services. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Develop and implement plan to combine Collection Station and Sanitation operations. • Analyze benefits of establishing a transfer station in Georgetown for Solid Waste services. • Work with Williamson County and other cities to determine options for collection and disposal of household hazardous waste materials. 114 • Sponsor, with the Collection Station, special neighborhood clean-up projects. • Continue to work with Code Enforcement staff on efforts to remove bulky waste and brush from areas identified as most critical and in need of extra services. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 99/00 00/01 1) Average # Homes Served 9,056 9,975 9,700 10,350 10,975 2) Total pounds of solid waste Projected Base Actual Budget Actual collected N/A 20,084,288* 24,300,000 31,600,000 33,500,000 3) Recycling participation rate N/A 42.68% 45% 42% 45% 4) Household Hazardous Waste Day Customers 676 490 600 840 850 5) Percentage of residential customer complaints as compared to service opportunities (average monthly) N/A 0.11% N/A 0.05% 0.05% 6) Percentage of commercial customer complaints as compared to service opportunities. (average monthly) N/A 0.08% N/A 0.10% 0.08% • New indicator for FY 98/99. Figure represents only 9 months for FY 98/99. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 38,488 41,115 42,100 Franchise Fees 47,500 (12.8%) 49,450 (4.1%) 51,710 58,153 69,981 General Fund Alloc. 66,865 (45%) 66,865 (0.0*�0) 95,855 106,117 104,785 Joint Svs Allocations 108,738 (3.8%) 108,738 (0.0%) 10,000 20,000 20,000 Special Svc & Legal 20,000 (0.o%) 20,000 (0.0%) 1,455,740 1,570,675 1,614,000 Texas Disposal Systems 2,055,882 (27.4%) 2,138,903 (4.0%) 4,882 5,000 5,000 Contingency 5,000 (0.0%) 5,000 (0.0%) 2,474 2,000 2,000 Programs & Projects 2,000 (0.0%) 2,000 (0.01/) 1,659,149 1,803,060 1,857,866 2,305,985 (24.1%) 2,390,956 (3.7%) * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Beginning October 1, .1998, the City contracted with a new company for solid waste and recycling services. This service emphasizes quality, customer satisfaction methods and City values. Increasing operational costs by the contractor results in a rate increase to offset these costs, effective in December 2000. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 115 WHAT WE DO: The Collection Station operates the public drop-off for solid waste services. Staff evaluate materials, determine residency, and charge fees based upon a service fee schedule. In addition, staff mows and maintains the closed landfill area. The Collection Station also operates a tree and brush mulching program and the recycling operation for waste oil, oil filters, batteries, and antifreeze. The Collection Station chips brush brought in and the wood chips are given to citizens at no charge. The City participates with local funds and staff support from this department in a Household Hazardous Waste clean-up program in conjunction with other cities, Williamson County, Brazos River Authority, and the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC). WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Planned and conducted a fall and spring Community Clean-up effort with assistance from Texas Disposal Systems, the Code Enforcement officers, police officers, and Georgetown Project VISTA volunteers. • Provided staff support to the Household Hazardous Waste Clean -Up event held in April, 2000. • Provided staff support to solid waste, recycling and bulky waste program, and assisted the service contractor with customer service issues and special concerns. • Conducted a review of services and fee changes based upon the review and a customer satisfaction survey, completed in the spring, 2000. 116 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Support the Household Hazardous Waste Clean - Up Program. • Support the solid waste, recycling and bulky waste program. • Plan and conduct special neighborhood clean-up projects. • Develop and implement a plan to combine the Collection Station and Sanitation operations. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 - ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED - ACTIVITY IlNDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) Gallons of Oil Recycled 3,636 3,636 3,400 3,500 3,500 2) Number of Customer Visits * N/A 5,500 5,800 6,000 6,000 3) Gallons of Antifreeze * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual Recycled 888 888 200 300 300 4) Cubic Yards of Waste Collected 5,200 5,200 3,900** 4,000 4,000 * New indicator for FY 98/99 **Reflects contract change in solid waste and bulky waste procedures. Curbside service allows additional amounts and bulky waste (up to five cubic yards in addition to the 96 gallon cart) to be picked up weekly. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 1.5/.5 1.5/.5 1.5/.5 # Employees 1.5/.5 1.5/.5 56,684 63,132 63,131 Personnel 62,813 (-0.5^/0) 62,813 (o.o%) 79,618 72,407 72,407 Operations 70,081 (-3.2%) 70,081 (0.o%) 136,302 135,539 135,538 132,894 (-2.0%) 132,894 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The implementation of a new contract with Texas Disposal Systems included changes in solid waste and bulky waste procedures, allowing customers to set out for weekly pick-up, a 96 gallon cart plus up to five additional cubic yards of waste. This change in curbside service has resulted in a decrease in the amount of waste citizens bring to the Collection Station for disposal. Solid waste rates will continually be impacted by the implementation of United States Environmental Protection Agency Subtitle D Regulations and Rules promulgated by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 117 O GE012 O��'DED � This page intentionally left blank. COMMUNITY SERVICES 118 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01