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03 - City Summary,Summary CITY SUMMARY TABLE OF CONTENTS Georgetown Century Plan Georgetown's Long -Term Planning Process .................................... MissionStatement............................................................................ The "Ends" Statements...................................................................... Annual Operating Plan Calendar of Events.........I........................... Organization Functional Structure.......................................................................... Budgeted Number of Employees...................................................... Overview of Indicators and Measures............................................................ Community Profile Location............................................................................................ Overview.......................................................................................... . Historic Georgetown......................................................................... ................................... 3 ................................... 3 .................................10 Recreation................................................................................................................................. 23 CulturalActivities..................................................................................................................... 24 Education.................................................................................................................................. 24 Georgetown's Top Employers.................................................................................................. 26 MiscellaneousStatistics............................................................................................................ 27 GEORGETOWN'S LONG-TERM PLANNING PROCESS Georgetown Century Plan The City of Georgetown is guided by a comprehensive strategic plan called the Georgetown Century Plan. The Century Plan (the Plan) was created by a broad-based group of Georgetown citizens, elected and appointed officials, and staff during the late 1980's. The Plan documents and formalizes the goals and processes by which Georgetown will strive to enhance its quality of life. Its foundation is the mission statement and a set of End statements, similar to goals, which are divided into 15 policy areas. Mission statement and Enol, statements The City's Mission Statement serves as a broad statement of purpose. There are fifteen citizen defined policy areas with each area defined with a broad Policy End statement. Ends describe, in specific terms, desired end -states. The End statements are the vision of Georgetown at its very best and represent the ultimate target at which all activities of the City are aimed. Specific Council and citizen direction given in each area are calledFocus Ends. This term is used because these statements focus staff efforts in accomplishing the Policy Ends. Each policy area has one Policy End, but may have many or no Focus Ends because more detailed planning processes are on-going and can change these focus statements. Functional Plans The Century Plan is further defined through periodic updates and through the development of Functional Plan Elements that address the 15 policy areas. The Functional Plans are created by citizen work groups and provide more detailed direction for accomplishing the goals identified by the End statements. Generally, one functional plan is prepared and adopted each year. Each Functional Plan may address one or policy areas. The policy guidance from each new Functional Plan is incorporated into the Century Plan End Statements through new or revised Focus End statements. The Functional Plan elements adopted to date are Land Intensity Plan Economic Development Strategic Plan Facilities and Services Plan Airport Functional Plan Transportation and Utilities Plan Parks & Recreation Plan Urban Design Plan The Housing Plan will be presented to Council and adopted in 2000/01. The Century Plan and the Functional Plan elements are published and distributed as a separate document. Link to Annual Budget The City staff and elected and appointed City Officials rely on the Ends to provide direction and guidance for recommending and authorizing the expenditure of public funds. The budget is the Annual Operating Plan element of the Century Plan. It is prepared around the 15 policy areas, supporting Policy and Focus Ends and the Functional Plans for each area or set by the City Council at its priority ranking meeting in May, after collecting community feedback. Not all Policy and Focus Ends are addressed in each Annual Operating Plan element. The Annual Operating Plan specifically defines the methods or processes by which the City Manager and City staff will go about achieving the desired end -states for each policy area. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 Means ,Statements The methods or processes by which the desired end -states are achieved are called Means. The Means, similar to objectives or strategies, are the specific actions required to accomplish the Ends. The Means are identified through strategic planning sessions with the senior management team and key division staff guided by the Century Plan and Council priorities. The Annual Operating Plan Element is a detailed look at each operational area, or department, within the City and its own unique set of Means. These Means are included with each division and are listed by the Policy Area and End statement(s) it addresses. Each Means statement includes the dates over which the project or program will be implemented and the primary departments responsible for it. Five -Year Plans The City uses a five year planning horizon to prepare the capital projects program and financial forecasts. The five- year capital projects program and the anticipated funding sources are incorporated into and adopted with the Annual Operating Plan. The capital planning process is discussed in more detail with the Capital Projects section. Five-year financial forecasts are prepared to guide policy and priority decisions of staff and Council. The fmancial forecasts meet budget and financial policies (see Reference Section) and are based on historical trends, programs and projects outlined during the other planning processes, and reasonable economic and growth projections. The revenue forecasts from these models are included in the Financial Summary section. Governance Model The City of Georgetown has implemented the Century Plan through the adoption and use of a governance model. The governance model is an advanced approach to Council operations which provides for Council to set policies and Ends, while leaving the Means for accomplishing those Ends and policies to the City Manager and his staff. As long as Council defined "executive limitations" are not broached, the City's staff is able to use its best efforts and judgement to perform the Means to accomplish the Ends. The City Council has adopted a formal governance policy guiding this process. The pages that follow in this section provide an overview of the City's Mission Statement with its supporting Ends categorized under their respective policy areas. Means to each of the Ends are detailed in the Division/Department pages found later in this document. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 MISSION STATEMENT To preserve and enhance the quality of life and unique character of Georgetown by: • Preserving the rich heritage and natural resources; • Promoting well-planned development, cost effective professional management and competent, friendly services; and it Protecting its citizens, the environment and all other assets. The "Ends" Statements ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.01 Existing undeveloped sites in Georgetown are put to beneficial use. Focus End 1.02 Small and mid-sized commercial and industrial firms find Georgetown a welcoming business environment. Focus End 1.03 The Georgetown Industrial Foundation, Chamber of Commerce, local merchants, business associations, and other potential business partners are assured of cooperation and collaboration from the City. Focus End 1.04 Georgetown citizens have the opportunity to find employment in the Georgetown area. Focus End 1.05 Citizens and local employers are supported by the City in their efforts to develop appropriate job-related skills. Focus End 1.06 Financial and non-financial barriers to economic development in the City are removed. Focus End 1.06.01 The downtown is economically viable Focus End 1.06.02 Georgetown's unique character is preserved. Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 3 ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESO URCE CONSERVATION Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development: Focus End 2.01 Sufficient, high-quality water is available to meet the current and future needs of citizens and businesses in Georgetown. Priority is given to: 1) human consumption 2) businesses 3) recreation Focus End 2.02 Wildlife is conserved. GRO'L 7HAND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT Focus End 100 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. HISTORIC PRESERVATION Policy End 5.00 Prehistoric and historic resources are preserved, protected and promoted for the benefit of the citizens of Georgetown. TIM rrcrur Policy End 6.00 All citizens have access to safe and adequate housing opportunities. PUBLIC INFORMATION AND EDUCATION Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens. CITY SUMMARY 4 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 PUBLIC SAFETY Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Focus End 8.01 The response times and service levels for emergency services are compatible in all parts of the City. Focus End 8.02 Public safety services extend sufficiently beyond the City limits through governmental contracts to ensure that citizens in all parts of the City are adequately protected. Focus End 8.03 Citizens are safe from animal threat. Focus End 8.03.01 City provides humane animal accommodations. Focus End 8.04 Georgetown is prepared to respond to large-scale natural and technological emergencies. Focus End 8.05 Public safety services have a high level of citizen and volunteer involvement. RECREATIONAND CULTURAL AFFAIRS Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space, recreation facilities and services, and social and cultural activities contribute to an enhanced quality of life for the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.01 Park facilities meet the leisure needs of citizens while minimizing the negative impact on adjacent properties. Priority is given to: 1) Blue Hole/Imhoff Dam 2) A coordinated system of hikeibike and equestrian trails along the San Gabriel rivers and their tributaries Focus End 9.02 Georgetown has a City-wide open space system. Priority is to be given to: 1) the tributaries of the San Gabriel River (e.g. Smith Branch, Pecan Branch, Berry Creek) 2) preservation of key open space views 3) enhancement of park and recreational facilities 4) promotion of environmental conservation and/or protection 5) providing the City with a "land bank" 6) providing buffering from more intensive uses Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. TRANSPORTATION Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Focus End 10.01 The Georgetown Municipal Airport primarily serves the general aviation needs of the community. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 5 URBAN DESIGN Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.01 Georgetown's unique character is maintained and enhanced. Focus End 11.01.01 The design of new structures and remodels in special districts is respectful and complimentary to existing districts and designs. Focus End 11.01.02 The design of public works projects reflects a consistent City them and historic flavor and features locally available materials. Priority to be placed on: 1) lighting 2) distinctive street signs, etc. Focus End 11.01.03 Prominent landmarks can be viewed from major roadways, particularly: (1) the County Courthouse, (2) First United Methodist Church, and (3) Cullen Building at Southwestern University. Focus End 11.01.04 Development in special districts is in character with or compliments the existing area. Focus End 11.02 The visually intrusive impact of public, works projects and public and private utilities and facilities is minimized. Priority to be placed on: 1) stormwater drainage/management 2) utility lines (electric, telephone, cable TV, etc.) 3) street design Focus End 11.03 Significant community locations and special events are easily located by citizens and visitors to Georgetown. Focus End 11.04 Parks and open space forma City-wide open space system. Focus End 11.04.01 Located to serve citizens needs Focus End 11.04.02 Preserve key open space views Focus End 11.05 The planning and design process maximizes the safety, comfort and convenience of pedestrians. Focus End 11.06 Commercial buildings are planned, designed and maintained in a manner that does not detract from the City's unique character. Focus End 11.06.01 Site planning standards encourage large commercial buildings to be closer to the roadway, with a majority of large parking areas located to the side and rear of the primary structure. Focus End 11.06.02 Large buildings are articulated in a manner and style that is reflective of Georgetown's character. CITY SUMMARY 6 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Focus End 11.07 The impact of commercial and industrial land uses on single family neighborhoods are minimized. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Focus End 11.09 Parking lots do not detract from primary commercial structures. Focus End 11.09.01 Natural environmental conditions are integrated into the design and construction of public and private non-residential projects. Priority is given to: 1) standards and incentives for the preservation of healthy mature trees that are 4" or greater in caliper Focus End 11.09.02 Outside storage is effectively screened and unobtrusive. Focus End 11.10 Citizens of Georgetown have the opportunity to enjoy a diverse and affordable range of new neighborhood developments. UTILITIES/ENERGY Policy End 12.00 City owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Focus End 12.01 Customers of the City's electric utility have a range of choices with respect to rates, service levels and power supply options. Focus End 12.02 City water and wastewater customers in all certified areas receive services which exceed state and federal standards. Focus End 12.03 The City's stormwater drainage system efficiently and effectively protects the health and safety of Georgetown's residents and minimizes the negative effects of standing water and urban runoff. FACILITIES AND SERVICES Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Focus End 13.01 The City centralizes and co -locates services on existing City -owned property whenever possible. Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Focus End 13.03 The City provides appropriate, well managed information technology and services that support City operations and citizen access to information. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 7 FINANCE Policy End Focus End Focus End Focus End Focus End Focus End Focus End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future needs are provided. 14.01 Each utility system is a self -supported operation that provides a desirable and affordable level of service. 14.02 The City investigates the privatization of each City operation, as appropriate. 14.03 The City's utility rates are competitive with surrounding communities and with the statewide and national averages for comparable utility systems. 14.04 The tax rate is reasonable and fair and does not hinder economic development. 14.05 The City has a method for funding street and streetscape improvements. 14.06 The City pursues all federal and state grant programs which would benefit the City. GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS Policy End 15.00 A high level of cooperation and involvement exists among Georgetown's citizens and governmental organizations. Focus End 15.01 All citizens actively participate in governmental functions. Focus End 15.02 The City develops and coordinates service delivery policies with Williamson County, the Georgetown Independent School District and other organizations that provide services to Georgetown. Focus End 15.03 The City is a strong and visible participant in developing comprehensive solutions to issues of concern on a regional level. 4 4 CITY SUMMARY 8 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 4 GE�RG�T Nh �ED�-. ago This page intentionally left blank. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 9 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan (AOP) Calendar of Events for Budget Adoption & Implementation Planning and Preparation January - February *AOP process schedule set. March - April May June July Adoption August *Five-year strategic planning issues and assumptions identified by senior management team. *F&A and IR staff meets with divisions on ISF needs for 00/01. *Five-year capital projects plan updated using systems engineering models and citywide review team. *Five-year capital plan reviewed by City Manager and senior management team. *Mid -year Review of 1999/00 Annual Operating Plan presented to Council. *Town Hall meeting held. *Council Priority ranking sessions. *AOP instructions distributed to city divisions, and training sessions held. *Five-year financial forecast models updated. *Budget packages prepared in accordance with Council guidelines and Georgetown Century Plan. *Five-year Capital Improvements Plan presented to Council. *Council budget guidelines distributed to city staff. *Budget work sessions by Century Plan policy area conducted. *Preliminary AOP workshop process with Council - public input. *Revenue and expenditure projections finalized. *Council balances budget. *Tax roll finalized. *Property Tax Rate and revenue finalized. *Division and department sections completed and sent to Finance & Administration. *AOP draft prepared by Finance & Administration. *AOP draft and AOP Highlights booklet distributed to Council and public. *Council work session(s) on proposed draft conducted. *Public hearings on proposed budget and property tax rate held. September *Budget and tax rate ordinances presented to and adopted by Council. October 1 *Implement 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan. Budget amendments may be made during the year in accordance with state law and city charter. See detailed Budget Amendments requirements in the Budget and Financial Policies included in the Reference Section. Typically, budget amendments are proposed to Council as part of the Mid Year AOP Review in May of each year and at fiscal year end. CITY SUMMARY 10 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 FUNCTIONAL STRUCTURE This chart indicates in graphic form the flow of influence and function within the City. Our residents (shown at the top of the circle), speaking individually and through the many advisory boards (shown in the ovals in the top half of the diagram), affect and control the activities of City government through the elected City Council and Mayor. The Council exerts direct supervision over the City Manager, who in turn supervises the various divisions of the City to achieve the Ends desired by our residents. D E ^'rte � s .cQOcc�y Q�acL0 y0 S �a O- O� F' L• 7 . Sir P�/0 d�04 y 6 Employee & Organizational P a frPP� G Services Met Ma'�aint ° a Legal Safety Services Services �s �C s c ay . oc h C �'� a� lo§ L• 7 . Sir P�/0 d�04 y 'Ljs,/Or' s ro s z v iv P a frPP� G A dm�nrstr Faci/it �cc0unt atipn Met Ma'�aint ° a Legal porch U�rciAa/Benonce asin fou t Services Uti/it��ce e7ies �s C° � end ogetOwn A y , Ureav p visit°rs C`°'�5�0'L�O�� MAYOR MaryEllen Kersch CITY COUNCIL Lee Bain Mayor Pro Tem Charles Burson Susan Hoyt Clark Lyda Llorente Navarrette Sam Pfiester Ferd Tonn George Russell CITY MANAGER City Secretary Administration GaP`1aopepaio�\5 0k Operations Prevention & Community Analysis CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 y Municipal ro s z v iv Judge m W Legal • W F a Services a m 3 �s �C c ay . oc h C �'� a� lo§ C� hQ �5 Qac a`�oo cue �e Administration GaP`1aopepaio�\5 0k Operations Prevention & Community Analysis CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 BUDGETED NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES The 2000/01 Operating Plan will include 10 additional full-time positions and 2 upgraded positions. • Fire Services will add six new Firefighters and add a full-time Operations Chief/911 Addressing Coordinator; • Management Services will add two full-time positions in the Legal Department; • Employee & Organizational Services will upgrade the Administrative Assistant to Benefits Assistant; • Information Resources will add a full-time Webmaster position; • Community Services will upgrade a Shelter Attendant position to full-time. The detailed personnel schedule is located in the Reference section. 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 EMPLOYEES - Full Time / Part Time Full Time Equivalents) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 EMPLOYEES - By Division 2000/01 Budget Police Info Res Parks & Rec Mgt Svcs corn Svc Dev Svs Eco Devo F&A Fire 350.5 Total Full Time Equivalents CITY SUMMARY 12 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 OVERVIEW OF INDICATORS AND MEASURES The City has begun an ongoing process to measure its activities and success in accomplishing its Ends and Means. The measures will give the City a gauge to help determine the most effective programs as well as provide diagnostic information to management and Council to improve services and planning. Most of these measures are included with the individual departments. The following is a summary of overall indicators used in the City's planning processes. Over the next few years many of these indicators will be shifted to a more outcome focus and incorporated into departmental sections. PROJECTIONS Population and customer growth projections are based on estimates by the City's Long Range Planning staff, data from the Texas State Comptroller's Office and other recognized sources. POPULATION 95 '96 '97 98 99 w 01' 'Or '03' '04• 05' •Ro/ectM CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 18,000 16,000 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 UTILITY CUSTOMERS e I A 95 196 '97 N 199 '00 '01' '02' '03' '04' 05' —Electric —Water a Wastewater Sanitation Prqj�ded 13 RATE COMPARISONS COMBINED MONTHLY RATES (Utilities and Taxes on $139,930 Home) $325 $375 $425 $475 Pflugerville Round Rock GEORGETOWN Austin Cedar Park Leander 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 '94 195 196 '97 1% 99 '00 54Kol 1 $433 $435 $451 $465 ACTIVITY INDICATORS POLICE CALLS FOR SERVICE PROPERTY TAX RATE COMPARISON .a0 Pflugerville (.6424) Temple (.5922) Austin (.4633) Georgetown (.31409) 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 114 195 196 '97 '9a 199 100 .20 (.6975) (64) Park (.4996) Rock (.33) FIRE CALLS FOR SERVICE CITY SUMMARY 14 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 RECREATION ACTIVITY 2,500 2,250 2,000 1,750 1,500 1,250 1,000 750 500 250 0 55,000 50,000 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 '97 198 199 100 O Rec Center Memberships ->-- Program Activity 200,000,000 175,000,000 150,000,000 125,000,000 M 100,000,000 a 0 75,000,000 50,000,000 25,000,000 0 BULDING PERMITS '94 '95 '96 '97 198 199 100 O Value - -Permits CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 1,500 4,500 4,000 1,250 3,500 1,000 3,000 2,500 750 2,000 500 1,500 1,000 250 500 0 0 LIBRARY CIRCULATION '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 ANIMAL SERVICE CALLS '94 195 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 15 BENCHMARKING An important way to measure our economic condition is through benchmarking, which is a point of reference from which measurements or progress can be made. Benchmarking measures our progress from a point in time and is something that serves as a standard by which others may be measured. Information obtained from the Peer City Survey, (initiated by the City of Temple), allows us to compare ourselves to other cities. $0 Total Assessed. Value $1 $2 $3 $4, Ledmle $3.65 Tyler $3.36 Longvj'w = $324 Round Rock - $2.97 Denton $2.65_ N. Richland His $2,40 Collage Station $2.11 Bayman - $2.10 Mean $1.95 NUaia $1.90 Tangle $1.89 Bryan - $1.76 Galveston 51.75 GEORG 1$1.20 Pon AMur $1.10 Survey Malaga $2.27 f0 Net G.O. Debt $25 $50 $75 Baytown $62.6 N. Richland His $62.3 Round Rock $591 Denten f5A.0 Tetryk $371 Port Mhw $372 Lnimle $35.2 Colege SIAM fJ2.8 LongwkwW$$14.18 131.7 Killeen N $142 O+Neston f 139 "n $129 EORGETOYM $198 Victoria $0S Tyler $66 Surveymnga 535.0 - s9 Sales Tax per Capita $150 $300 Round Rork 538E N. Rktdand lige $281 Tykr $270 L0'ge," $249 Ler4svge $213 Tenpk $192 Denton $194 GaNestan 317! Colette slation $174 Warta N $142 Bryan f 139 Men $129 GEORGETOM $198 B+N'm $0S PartArthur $66 Surveylverapa $188 16 Net G.O. Debt per Capita Al $500 $1,000 $i NRkhlandM - -x $7,148 R=dRock $1.137 Brlloyn $858 Denton t.•-::..:-:ax:;:>:c:;;:-;>:-::.:.:•__ __ _ _ $784 Tenple $672 Port Arthur • .. e.•..:-::.:.-:- -:e -•::<-$835 GEORGETOWN $828 College SteAen LeWw*•::w �:.:x::v:;:�: •ae ....... $458 Longdew : $422 Uyeston -%:5313 Bryan ce - -` 5300 Gleen 5260 uaEoria $252 Tyler <•=<^:+ $177 SuveyMerage This survey is conducted in February and is based on historical information. Data is from 1998/99. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Ad Valorem Tax Rate $0.00 $025 $0.50 $0.75 Port Arthur 0.1 Baytown 0.7570 Wtlaria 0.7000 Bryan 0.8387 !Glean 0.8000 - N. Richland Hik 0.5700 Temple 0.5572 Galveston 0.5499 Longiiew 0.5334 Dentin O M LeWw44 0.4518 Collage 5tffion 0.4203 Round Rock 0.3830 GEORGETOWN 0.3500 Tyler0.2954 Survey Merage 0.5365 Net G.O. Debt per Capita Al $500 $1,000 $i NRkhlandM - -x $7,148 R=dRock $1.137 Brlloyn $858 Denton t.•-::..:-:ax:;:>:c:;;:-;>:-::.:.:•__ __ _ _ $784 Tenple $672 Port Arthur • .. e.•..:-::.:.-:- -:e -•::<-$835 GEORGETOWN $828 College SteAen LeWw*•::w �:.:x::v:;:�: •ae ....... $458 Longdew : $422 Uyeston -%:5313 Bryan ce - -` 5300 Gleen 5260 uaEoria $252 Tyler <•=<^:+ $177 SuveyMerage This survey is conducted in February and is based on historical information. Data is from 1998/99. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 IMPORTANCE The benchmarking survey compares cities with 50,000 or more population. Georgetown is included in the survey due to growth rate, being a public power city, and proximity to Austin. Growth comparison over the years is indicated in the graphs below. 3 Year Benchmark Comparison Georgetown Population Customer Growth Building Permits Issued Unemployment Rate Appraised Values =0� Total Tax Rate Streets Capital Costs Debt Service Tax Rate Then and Now 1990/91 97/98 98/99 99/00 Projected 98/99 vs 99/00 Population 25,500 26,400 28,000 6% increase Area (Square Miles) 23.6 23.7 23.8 .04% increase General Fund Budget $11,702,079 S12,006,868 $12,571,952 5% increase Total Assessed Value 5984,123,199 $1,199,831,232 S1,410,171,718 18% increase Ad Valorem Tax Rate $0.35 $0.35 $0.34 Stable Sales Tax Collections $2,415,396 S2,858,475 $3,250,000 14% increase Sales Tax Per Capita $95 $108 $116 7 % increase Georgetown Population Customer Growth Building Permits Issued Unemployment Rate Appraised Values =0� Total Tax Rate Streets Capital Costs Debt Service Tax Rate Then and Now 1990/91 2000/01 14,842 28,000 2% 6-10% 49 780 3.3 1.4 $335,775,697 $1,721,609,775 $0.39 $0.31 $130,378 $2,610,000 $0.13 $0.107 CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 17 LOCATION The City of Georgetown is located on IH -35 just 26 miles north of Austin in the northeastern corner of the scenic Texas Hill Country. Georgetown is the county seat of Williamson County which borders Travis County to the south and Bell County to the north. CITY SUMMARY 18 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 OVERVIEW Founded July 4, 1848, Georgetown was originally the agricultural trade center for the county and surrounding area. After the Civil War, Reconstruction brought prosperity to Georgetown through four main industries -- cattle, cotton, the university and the railroad. Georgetown has enjoyed consistent growth and development through the years. In recent years the City has become more industrialized and commercially oriented. Along with the commercial growth, Georgetown has successfully promoted tourism. Tourism has become a significant economic benefit to the community. The City of Georgetown has a 2000 estimated population of 28,600 within the city limits and an extraterritorial jurisdiction estimated population of 10,500. Georgetown is a Home Rule Charter City and operates under the Council -Manager form of government. A mayor and seven council members are elected from single -member districts. Elections are held the first Saturday in May. 50,000 40,000 30,000 0 0 20,000 a 10,000 0 A CENTURY OF GROWTH 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Medical services in Georgetown are provided by several agencies, public and private, and a large number of professional individuals. Georgetown Hospital, a 104 -bed full service medical facility with 225 admitting physicians, serves at the centerpiece for Georgetown Healthcare System, providing obstetrical, surgical, diagnostic and emergency services to the local area. The completion of the $9.5 million, 80,000 square foot expansion and renovation project increases the diagnostic, ambulatory care, and birthing capabilities. Also included is the Georgetown Cancer Treatment Center which provides medical and radiation oncology services that are close to home. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 19 46,000 28,600 14,842 a 9,441 3,096 2,871 3,583 4,945 5,218 6 395 3,682 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Medical services in Georgetown are provided by several agencies, public and private, and a large number of professional individuals. Georgetown Hospital, a 104 -bed full service medical facility with 225 admitting physicians, serves at the centerpiece for Georgetown Healthcare System, providing obstetrical, surgical, diagnostic and emergency services to the local area. The completion of the $9.5 million, 80,000 square foot expansion and renovation project increases the diagnostic, ambulatory care, and birthing capabilities. Also included is the Georgetown Cancer Treatment Center which provides medical and radiation oncology services that are close to home. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 19 HISTORIC GEORGETOWN The North and South San Gabriel Rivers, winding through the center of Georgetown, have always attracted people to this area. Spanish explorers noted the rivers and creeks here in the 1700s. The Tonkawa Indians and many other tribes chose this area for camp grounds. When pioneer settlers came to Texas, they found this spot where, in 1848, Georgetown was established. At first, Georgetown was a tiny, dusty town made up of shanties and crude log houses. Then, three things brought about monumental changes. First, Georgetown's location along a major cattle trail heading North to the famous Chisholm Trail brought business and settlers as the cattle industry boomed. Simultaneously, the railroads came to the area which aided in the growth of the agricultural industry. Growth boomed from 1880 to 1910. The downtown buildings were improved or replaced by fine Victorian structures. Most of our present downtown structures were built during this golden era in Georgetown's history. About 1920 growth slowed and many years passed with few changes. However, growth surged from the late 1970s to the early 1980s when two major events took place. First, Lake Georgetown was developed by the Army Corp of Engineers for flood control, recreation, and water supply. The Lake, now in full operation, has enhanced Georgetown's tourist and recreational capacity and ensures our future water supply. Secondly, Georgetown's participation in the Main Street Program propelled us into a second golden era during which almost all the downtown square and many older homes were restored to their Victorian splendor. CITY SUMMARY 20 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Since the 1980's Georgetown has been synonymous with Main Street, a downtown economic development effort administered through the Texas Historical Commission and the National Main Street Center. Over $30 million has been reinvested in our economy through the revitalization efforts of the downtown area. Private and public entities joined in partnership to restore and renovate downtown commercial structures, public buildings as well as building new structures to help anchor the commercial district. This unprecedented success has made our community the shining star of the Texas Main Street program and an example for small cities nationwide to follow. It has been the building block for Georgetown's recent economic development gains. In 1997, Georgetown was one of 5 cities nationwide to receive the prestigious Great American Main Street Award because of our exceptional accomplishments in the revitalization of our historic downtown. Georgetown was the first Texas town so recognized. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 21 After all this, it might seem time for Georgetown to rest on its laurels. Not a chance! As the people of Georgetown gear up for the 19th year of Main Street economic development, our successes continue to grow. The historic downtown post office has been saved and restored as city offices, the City and the Georgetown Heritage Society restored the famous Grace Episcopal Church and downtown special events like the Christmas Stroll continue to gain in popularity and status. Main Street Georgetown is moving forward and bettering its solid reputation as a first class tourist destination and shopping center. A_ t The Georgetown Square is considered by many to be the finest example in the state of a Victorian town square. Our historic square is certainly the magnet that draws I q people to Georgetown. However, once they're here, people soon realize there's much more to our community. It's a town with a strong identity and people who care about it... people that make sure we never stop trying to. enhance both Georgetown's appeal and the lives of those who choose to live here. int: k` INN M1, CITY SUMMARY 22 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 RECREATION Georgetown offers a wealth of recreation. In Georgetown there are currently twenty three city parks comprising nearly 380 total acres. The parks range from a half -acre neighborhood park to the one hundred -acre city wide San Gabriel Park. The parks include a wide range of facilities including: softball and baseball fields, soccer fields, playground equipment, individual and group picnic shelters, basketball and tennis courts, disc golf, a hike and bike trail and five swimming pools. The San Gabriel Park also has a community center, sunken garden, gazebo, football stadium, rodeo area, and a Creative Playscape for children. The Georgetown Recreation Center has a full basketball and volleyball court, two racquetball courts, a game room, weight room, kitchen, conference room and large and small activity rooms. The City purchased and opened the Georgetown Tennis Center in September 1999. The facility includes a full size swimming pool and baby pool, 11 tennis courts and activity center on 7 wooded acres. The City of Georgetown Parks and Recreation Division was chosen as the winner of the 1999 Gold Medal Award for excellence in recreation and park management Lake Georgetown, a 1200 -acre lake, is just a few minutes drive from any point in the City. The lake's three recreational areas are ideal for fishing, camping, picnicking and all types of water sports. Maintained by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lake Georgetown also has boat ramps, wilderness hiking trails, recreational vehicle hookups, and a large swimming beach. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 23 N' 4 y Lake Georgetown, a 1200 -acre lake, is just a few minutes drive from any point in the City. The lake's three recreational areas are ideal for fishing, camping, picnicking and all types of water sports. Maintained by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lake Georgetown also has boat ramps, wilderness hiking trails, recreational vehicle hookups, and a large swimming beach. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 23 There are five local golf courses. The private courses, Berry Creek Country Club and Georgetown Country Club each offer private 18 hole courses. Southwestern University has a six hole course open to the public and Legacy Hills Golf Course and White Wing Golf Course at Del Webb's Sun City Georgetown are Georgetown's newest 18 hole public courses. CULTURAL ACTWITIES Cultural activity thrives in Georgetown. Southwestern University's contribution of quality theater, dance, fine arts and lecture events add a valuable dimension to our cultural life. The Art deco -styled Palace Theatre, located on the downtown square, is currently being renovated and rejuvenated by townspeople. The Palace Theatre showcases events such as singing acts, plays, talent shows and every second Saturday of the month the Theatre hosts the Georgetown Opry. Georgetown always has a full calendar of local events including a fall Antique Show, a Fourth of July celebration with music, food and fireworks and ethnic celebrations. Other major annual events include the Christmas Stroll, Red Poppy Festival, and the Annual Airshow & Fly In. EDUCATION Georgetown Independent School District (GISD) serves the City and the surrounding area, having a current enrollment of 7,900 students. The District operates seven elementary schools, two middle schools,one ninth grade campus, one high school and one alternative educational school. There are also three private schools and one parochial school in the area. The public school system is exceptional in the quality of teachers and programs offered. The performance of GISD students is well above national averages. Georgetown boasts the highest SAT score in the Austin Metro Area. Georgetown has a strong vocational education program beginning in junior high school. On-the-job training away from campus is a vital part of the program. Vocational courses include electronics, business education, drafting, industrial cooperative training, agriculture, food service, homemaking, auto -mechanics, and welding. A Coordinated Vocational Academic Education program is also available for qualified high school students. Under the Tech Prep Program, students earn both high school and college credits while pursuing several vocational careers. CITY SUMMARY 24 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Georgetown is the home of Southwestern University, a private four-year undergraduate institution, offering a traditional liberal arts and sciences curriculum. The University has a current enrollment of 1,289 Located 10 blocks from the City's central business district, present facilities include some 37 buildings located on approximately 500 acres. SOUTHVEST.BR-N L;NIVERSITV t'LIAk-FFi.:1 5... - T_ Southwestern University has been named among 40 colleges across the nation in a book by former"New York Times" education editor Loren Pope, which focuses on schools which make significant impacts in the lives of their students. In Colleges That Change Lives, Pope, profiles 40 schools from the Northeast, South, Midwest, Southwest and Northwest regions through extensive on -campus research and interviews students, faculty, and staff at colleges nationwide. Southwestern is one of just three schools from the Southwest region to be included. Southwestern has also been ranked No. 10 in U.S. News & World Report's "Best College Values" listing within its category of National Liberal Arts Colleges. It is the only Texas school within its category to be included in the rankings. Money magazine recently named Southwestern as one of the nations' 100 "Best Buys." The 1997 Fiske Guide to Colleges placed Southwestern among 300 of the "best and most interesting" of America's 2000 four-year colleges and universities. Southwestern is also listed in The National Review College Guide's "America's Top 50 Liberal Arts College" The Princeton Review's "America's Best 306 Colleges," Barron' College Guide, Peterson's Competitive Colleges, Rugg§ Recommendation on the Colleges and the Templeton Honor Roll for Character Building Colleges. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 25 GEORGETOWN'S TOP EMPLOYERS This list of the City's top employers indicates the increasingly diverse nature of the local economy. The City has played a major role in retaining and attracting new employers to the area. Governmental Manufacturing Williamson County 1,038 Advance Cable Services, LTD.* 50 City of Georgetown 322 Advance Metal Systems* 40 Airborne, Inc. 250 Educational Aircraft System Manufacturing 40 Chatsworth Products* 125 Georgetown ISD 1,250 Deaton Engineering/Design Southwestern University 450 & Assembly Concepts 50 House of Hatten 80 ,service Pioneer International Steel 80 Pringle & Associates 60 Del Webb's Sun City Georgetown 1,300 Manitwoc Boom Trucks 178 Georgetown Hospital 550 Mrs. Bairds 31 Georgetown Railroad 38 Reedholm Instruments, Inc.* 45 GTE Southwest 62 Sierra Microwave* 65 Texas Electric Cooperatives - Retail Transformer Division* 125 Albertsons 130 Triple S Plastics 300 HEB 245 Xycarb Ceramics USA * 85 Wal-Mart 150 * Assisted through state grants/loan guarantees arranged by and administered by the City. 4. CITY SUMMARY 26 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Miscellaneous ,Statistics Public Safety Police Fire Number of stations 1 4 Number of officers/firefighters 50 36 (exclusive of volunteer firefighters) Education Attendance Centers Number of students 12 7,900 Positions Adopted Full time 318.25 Part time 32.25 New construction building permits issued Oct. 99 - Sept. 2000 - 800 Total number of utility customers as of Sept. 30, 2000: Electric - 13,482 Water - 12,652 Sanitation- 11,101 Wastewater - 10,450 Infrastructure Miles of streets 340 Number of street lights 2,227 Miles of water mains 305 Miles of sanitary sewers 205 Miles of storm sewers 36 Miles of electric distribution lines 263 Annual electric sales - mWh 299,040 Peak demand - mW 73 Recreation & Culture Number of parks 23 Acres of parks 380 Number of libraries 1 public Number of volumes 69,888 Library circulation 276,453 Library visits 184,425 CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 27 C) ,�z This page intentionally left blank. CITY SUMMARY 28 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01