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FY2001 Budget Document - Whole-- --40A,- -1 Annual Operating Plan Element of the Georgetown Century Plan h� -. lim ___;;;io� TABLE OF CONTENTS Title Page Councilmembers Budget Award . Values Statement Table of Contents OVERVIEW TransmittalLetter................................................................................................................................i CITY SUMMARY Georgetown Century Plan Georgetown's Long -Term Planning Process.......................................................................1 Listof Ends.............................................................................................................................3 AnnualOperating Plan Preparation...............................................................................................10 Organization......................................................................................................................................11 CommunityProfile............................................................................................................................18 FINANCIAL SUMMARY Summary............................................................................................................................................ 29 Revenues............................................................................................................................................34 FundSummaries...............................................................................................................................44 COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES DIVISION DivisionDescription & Financial Summary...................................................................................63 Ends& Means...................................................................................................................................65 Community Owned Utilities Administration..................................................................................72 EnergyServices.................................................................................................................................74 PumpMaintenance...........................................................................................................................78 SystemsEngineering.........................................................................................................................80 TransportationServices...................................................................................................................82 WaterServices...................................................................................................................................86 COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION Division Description & Financial Summary...................................................................................95 Ends& Means...................................................................................................................................97 CommunityServices Administration..........................................................................................102 GeneralGovernment Contracts.....................................................................................................104 Airport..............................................................................................................................................106 AnimalServices...............................................................................................................................108 PublicLibrary.................................................................................................................................110 Sanitation.........................................................................................................................................114 -- ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DIVISION Division Description & Financial Summary.................................................................................119 Ends& Means..................................................................................................................................121 DevelopmentProcess Team............................................................................................................128 DevelopmentSupport......................................................................................................................130 InspectionServices..........................................................................................................................132 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIVISION Division Description & Financial Summary.................................................................................135 Ends& Means..................................................................................................................................137 Administration......................................................... .......................................... .. ............................ 140 Convention& Visitors Bureau.......................................................................................................142 MainStreet.......................................................................................................................................146 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION DIVISION Division Description & Financial Summary.................................................................................149 Ends& Means..................................................................................................................................151 Accounting.......................................................................................................................................156 FinanceAdministration..................................................................................................................158 FacilitiesMaintenance....................................................................................................................160 FleetManagement...........................................................................................................................164 MunicipalCourt ..............................................................................................................................170 Purchasing& Properties.................................................................................................................174 UtilityOffice (including Meter Readers).......................................................................................176 FIRE SERVICES DIVISION Division Description & Financial Summary.................................................................................179 Ends& Means..................................................................................................................................181 Administration.................................................................................................................................186 Operations........................................................................................................................................188 Prevention& Community Analysis...............................................................................................190 INFORMATION RESOURCES DIVISION Division Description & Financial Summary .................................................................................193 Ends& Means..................................................................................................................................195 InformationResources Operations................................................................................................198 Information Resources Capital Replacement...............................................................................200 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION Division Description & Financial Summary.................................................................................203 Ends& Means.................................................................................................................................205 CityCouncil.....................................................................................................................................214 CityManager's Office.....................................................................................................................216 LegalServices..................................................................................................................................218 Employee& Organizational Services............................................................................................220 SafetyServices.................................................................................................................................224 PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION DivisionDescription & Financial Summary.................................................................................227 Ends& Means.................................................................................................................................229 Parks................................................................................................................................................234 Recreation.......................................................................................................................................240 POLICE SERVICES DIVISION DivisionDescription & Financial Summary.................................................................................245 Ends& Means.................................................................................................................................247 PoliceAdministration.....................................................................................................................252 SpecialOperations..........................................................................................................................256 InformationManagement..............................................................................................................258 PatrolServices.................................................................................................................................260 ProfessionalStandards...................................................................................................................262 CAPITAL PROJECTS CapitalProjects & Five Year Plan................................................................................................265 0) B13y DebtManagement & Policy...........................................................................................................289 OutstandingDebt by Type.............................................................................................................290 GeneralDebt Service......................................................................................................................291 UtilityDebt Service.........................................................................................................................294 ProposedDebt Issues......................................................................................................................296 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 REFERENCE Personnel..........................................................................................................................................299 CriticalNeeds...................................................................................................................................306 TransfersBetween Funds...............................................................................................................311 InternalService Premiums.............................................................................................................312 Ordinances.......................................................................................................................................314 Budget& Financial Policies...........................................................................................................323 UtilityRates Schedule.....................................................................................................................341 AdvisoryBoards & Commissions..................................................................................................344 GLOSSARY/INDEX Glossary............................................................................................................................................347 Index.................................................................................................................................................354 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 overview �' �1 Geo tow October 1, 2000 To the Honorable Mayor Kersch, members of the City Council and citizens: I am pleased to present to you the adopted Annual Operating Plan Element (Operating Plan) of the Georgetown Century Plan for 2000/2001. The Georgetown Century Plan is the comprehensive strategic plan by which Georgetown strives to enhance its quality of life. The Operating Plan is an outline of the programs and services to be provided by the City during the coming year. The Operating Plan continues the direction established by our citizens and the City Council to meet the existing challenges and effectively plan for fixture needs. It is also an opportunity to ensure energies and resources are directed to the programs, policies and issues that are shaped by the Georgetown Century Plan. In developing the 2000/01 Operating Plan, a new, more community -involved process was developed. Town Hall Meetings, public workshops and televised meetings were implemented to give more citizens the opportunity to be involved in the budget process. The Council took the active role in balancing the community needs with the available resources. The result is what you see before you. Budget Process for 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan a Rp v o o� C. 5Qjj�'`�°``�'�Q�o °°� 'got` G`Q GHQ ��� °� 'e 0a Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept CITY HALL • 609 MAIN STREET POST OFFICE Bax 409 • GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 78627-0409 - 51 2/930-3652 • FAX: 51 2/930-3659 BUDGET OVERVIEW As Georgetown continues to 10% grow, so do the expectations of s% the citizens of Georgetown. The soy, projected increases for the a% 2000/01 Operating Plan are the direct result of the phenomenal 2% growth the City of Georgetown 0% continues to experience. Variables of Growth This is the sixth straight year the City has grown by more than 7% annually. The outcome of this growth is. an increasing demand for services by our citizens, which is offset by the City's ability to retain valued employees and compete for job applicants in today's tight labor market. 2000101 Budget by Function Operations 58% Debt Service 7% Interfund Capital 9% Projects 26% The 2000/01 Operating Plan totals $85 million for all funds. Of that amount, approximately $49 million is for continued operations, $5.6 million is for debt service, and $22 million for capital improvement projects. Interfund charges/transfers, which. include internal service fund transfers, are approximately $8 million. Overall increases in this Operating Plan are due to additional staffing in Fire Services and demand -based costs, such as purchased electric power. The General Fund, which accounts for basic _ tax supported services, totals $13.6 million, an increase of 8% more than 1999/2000. This increase mirrors the 7-8% growth in residents and utility customers over the past year. Property Taxes. The City Council adopted a property tax rate of $0.31409 per $100 valuation, which is the effective tax rate for 2000/01. While the tax rate itself decreases from the current rate of $0.34, the average homeowner in Georgetown will pay approximately the same amount in City property taxes as they did in 1999/2000. This decrease in rates results from increased valuations on existing property. Assessed Property valuation 2.000 ,.750 Property Values. The total taxable ,soo property has risen 14%; from $1.4 billion in ,z5o 1999/2000 to $1.6 billion in 2000/01. This increase includes $110 million in new 1'000 property., This also includes a 6.5% increase 750 in existing property values over last year. 500 250 0- 94195 95198 96197 97/98 98199 99M 00101 ❑ Existing Property E3 New Property 2000/0/ Operating Plan Element - Transmittal Letter Page ii of vii Utility Rates. There are no water, wastewater or electric rate increases included in 2000/01 for the ninth consecutive year. Sanitation rates will increase $0.90 for residential and 5.4% for commercial customers in December 2000. This increase will help offset the rising operational costs incurred by the City's sanitation contractor. $140 $120 $100 $80 $60 $40 $20 $0 Sales Tax Per Capita - 7.25% '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 Economic Outlook. Georgetown and the Central Texas region continue to experience strong economic growth. Sales tax revenue for Georgetown has increased an -average of 16% over the past five years. Sales Tax growth is expected to increase to approximately 9% over the next two to three years. Housing starts continue to remain strong, totaling 757, of which 317 were for Sun City Texas. This is the fifth straight year of 750 or more residential permits per year. Non-residential starts have also increased, with numerous new- retail, commercial and small industrial facilities in various stages of construction. Sun City Texas continues to provide long-term retail and commercial growth for the community. In 199.5, Del Webb Corporation began a 9,500 home, 5,300 -acre active retirement community in the northwestern quadrant of the City. The City's development agreement with the Del Webb Corporation provides for fire protection, wastewater, water and electric services and transportation improvements. Del Webb pays a per unit fee (called SIP fee) for its share of the improvements. The City makes all infrastructure improvements and debt payments using the SIP fees without cash shortfalls or increases in overall service rates. As of September 30, 2000, 2,247 homes have been completed and over 150 more are in various states of construction. BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS The major initiatives for the 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan and beyond are outlined as follows: • Economic Development In 1999/2000, the Council appointed an Economic Development Task Force to make recommendations for the community's economic development strategy. From this process, an Economic Development Division was created for 2000/01. The purpose of the division will be to recruit new business and help sustain the local economy, direct the Main Street Program and manage the Convention and Visitor's Buteau. 2000/01 Operating Plan Element - Transmittal Letter Page iii of vii Fee Analysis and Review A major objective for 2000/01 will be to assess the citywide financial condition and review its financial strategies in order to develop a long-term business plan that will ensure adequate financial resources for the City in the future. As part of this project, a competitive fee analysis of all City fees, including utility rates, will be undertaken to determine whether the fee structure is adequate to cover the costs associated with providing service. • Staffing Issues The 2000/01 Operating Plan reflects a substantial commitment to invest in the human resources of the City. It includes a 5.5% increase in salary adjustments, or $550,000, to fund the City's merit based pay -for -performance system. In addition, $200,000 was included to improve the employee benefits program. The 2000/01 Plan includes ten (10) additional full-time .positions and two (2) up -graded positions, for a total of 350.50 full-time equivalents (FTE's). The most significant increase is the addition of seven (7) positions in Fire Services to alleviate staffing shortages and to fully staff Fire Station No. 4 on Airport Road. Other additions include two full- time positions in the legal department and a new webmaster position in Information Resources to manage the growing demand on the City's website. • Affordable Housing The City has allocated $30,000 to begin implementation of a citizen committee to plan for the City's need for affordable housing. These funds will be used for the further development of the housing plan and for possible grant matching funds for affordable housing projects. • Utility Issues Providing clarity for the City's long-range water planning process, to ensure future community needs, will be a priority for 2000/01. This includes researching options for securing future water availability and further developing a long-range regional approach to this issue. The City will also implement a Backflow Prevention program to provide protection of the City"s water supply and ensure citizens of the safest and highest quality of water. Another priority for 2000/01 will be to continue monitoring electric deregulation issues to ensure that the City's electric system will be compliant and provide quality service to our customers. • Capital Projects The City will spend $22.4 million on new infrastructure projects in 2000/01. The City will begin construction of the Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant to provide treatment capacity for Sun City Texas and other significant development in the City's north and northwest quadrants. Major street projects include the realignment of Country Club Drive and the Maple Street extension. The City's Water Department will also complete the construction of pump stations at Sun City and Rabbit Hill, along with continued construction of the. West Loop Water Line to improve water transmission to various parts of the city. 2000/01 Operating Plan Element - Transmittal Letter Page iv of vii FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS The City is committed to sound, financial planning and direction, as reflected in the Finance Policy portion of the Georgetown Century Plan and the Budget and Financial Policies adopted as part of the budget. The Council's goal to achieve Finance Focus End 14.01, which states "Each utility system is a self -supported operation that provides a desirable and affordable level of service." is continued in this budget. All of the City's enterprise Rinds, including the Airport, are self-supporting. The City has also met its commitment for minimizing tax increases by including no increase to our property tax rate. The minimum contingency reserve remains at $8.5 million to meet policy requirements. A more detailed look at the City's revenues and funds is provided in the Financial Summary Section. 95196 96197 97198 98199 99100 00101 Proj. Combined Utility Revenues Millions 0 10 20 30 40 ® Electric . ® Water o Wastewater D Sanitation tD Stormwater Revenues. The City's revenues continue to rise due to growth in sales tax revenue, increased property taxes from increased valuations, as well as new property, and increased utility services demand. The City's overall customer base for its electric, sanitation, wastewater and water services has increased at a rate of 8- 9% for the last three years. However, the City has elected to conservatively project at a 6-7% increase in revenues due to utility growth. Since weather conditions affect the electric and water revenues significantly, revenue projections utilize these conservative growth estimates to avoid budget shortfalls, and utilize a rolling average consumption method to factor out any weather aberrations. General Fund. As in many other cities, Georgetown's General Fund revenues, do not support its expenses, which are increasing at a higher rate than its revenues, due in part to the $3 increased demand for governmental services, such as Fire and Police Services. Historically, $2 the City has maintained a low tax rate by using the excess revenues from its utility funds to $1 balance the General Fund. Although all other City funds will be self-supporting, the General Fund continues to rely on substantial transfers to $0 fund operating expenditures. General Fund Transfers 9455 95198 98/97 97/98 98/99 99W 00101 0 GFund Shortfall Transfers o % GFund Expenditures 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2000/01 Operating Plan Element - Transmittal Letter Page v of vii c 0 9455 95198 98/97 97/98 98/99 99W 00101 0 GFund Shortfall Transfers o % GFund Expenditures 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2000/01 Operating Plan Element - Transmittal Letter Page v of vii Because of customer growth, there is an increased demand for utility services; therefore, the excess funds previously sent to the General Fund are now needed to fund infrastructure improvements within each utility. Recognizing this issue, the City Council minimized new General Fund spending in the 2000/01 budget to reduce the reliance on utility transfers. In 2000/01, the General Fund will require a balancing transfer of $1.9 million or 14.4% of expenses, which is a 36.8% decrease from the prior year. The long-term goal is to continue reducing these transfers through gradual increases in fees and other General Fund revenue. Additional efforts will be managed through the policy limit on transfers and limiting growth in available City services. General Obligation Debt. The City included a proposed debt issuance of $490,000 in its property tax rate calculation for 2000/01. Currently included in this proposed debt issue is the $490,000 reimbursement of funds expended on lighting at the City's new athletic complex. This debt issuance is for street projects included in the Capital Improvement Program may also be added, depending on the timing of the individual projects. Council sub -committees for transportation and facilities are currently meeting to finalize projects that may also effect the spring 2001 debt issue. Currently, the City's General Obligation Debt per capita is $626, well below the national average of $765. The City currently holds an "A" bond rating with both Standard & Poors and Moody's. The economic outlook for Georgetown has recently moved to "positive" from "stable", thus indicating the City's continued strong economy and sound fiscal management. Electric, Wastewater and Water Funds. The City's electric, wastewater and water systems continue to generate revenues sufficient for operations and maintenance and some system improvements. An increase in the fuel surcharge assessed by the Lower Colorado River Authority, the City's source of purchased power, was passed through to the City's electric customers in 2000. Future long-term water supply and the uncertain issues related to electric deregulation may require a rate increase at some point in the future. The City plans to issue $1 million in new revenue debt in 2000/01 to fund electric system expansions. This additional debt will not require a rate increase to- fund the added debt payments. -The City is using a combination of previously issued revenue. debt and cash to fund the Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant and interceptor. _The times coverage ratio, a standard measure of utility revenue debt capacity, is 3.29 times coverage for 2000/01, which exceeds the policy requirement of 1.5 times coverage. Airport Fund. The recent closure of private aircraft facilities in the Austin metropolitan area has caused a dramatic increase in service demands at the City's airport over the past three years. Previously issued Airport debt proceeds will be used as a grant match for the expansion of the terminal building. Fuel revenues, leases and rents are projected to be sufficient to fund the related- debt payments and to set aside reserve funds for future,improvement projects. Internal $.ervice Funds. The internal service funds provide administrative services and asset management for information, facility, and fleet services to City programs and departments by charging lease and administrative fees. 2000/01 Operating Plan Element - Transmittal Letter Page .vi of vii Information Services Fund $1,123,000 Add and replace desktop, network and application technology and hardware, including 77 new and replacement PC's, training for City staff and - maintenance costs of existing software applications. .Facilities Maintenance Fund $609,000 Fleet Management Fund $1,110,000 CONCLUSION Building maintenance and repairs to include HVAC, janitorial services and minor remodeling. Add/replace 16 vehicles and various shop equipment. Growth issues will continue to dominate Council and staff time. The staff is ,prepared to respond to the growth and associated service demands. I believe this budget accomplishes the goals and objectives set forth by the Council and the community. It reflects the,importance and value we place in City staff, as well as emphasizing the demands placed on staff, by the community, for quality service. Finally, I acknowledge the tremendous contributions and teamwork of all City staff in preparing the 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan Element. Most notably, I,want to recognize the Finance and Administration Division for their long and dedicated hours in preparing the Operating Plan. 2000/01 Operating Plan Element - Transmittal Letter Page vii of vii N41 NDED This page intentionally left blank. 1% ,Summary CITY SUMMARY TABLE OF CONTENTS Georgetown Century Plan Georgetown's Long -Term Planning Process .................................... MissionStatement............................................................................ The "Ends" Statements...................................................................... Annual Operating Plan Calendar of Events.........I........................... Organization Functional Structure.......................................................................... Budgeted Number of Employees...................................................... Overview of Indicators and Measures............................................................ Community Profile Location............................................................................................ Overview.......................................................................................... . Historic Georgetown......................................................................... ................................... 3 ................................... 3 .................................10 Recreation................................................................................................................................. 23 CulturalActivities..................................................................................................................... 24 Education.................................................................................................................................. 24 Georgetown's Top Employers.................................................................................................. 26 MiscellaneousStatistics............................................................................................................ 27 GEORGETOWN'S LONG-TERM PLANNING PROCESS Georgetown Century Plan The City of Georgetown is guided by a comprehensive strategic plan called the Georgetown Century Plan. The Century Plan (the Plan) was created by a broad-based group of Georgetown citizens, elected and appointed officials, and staff during the late 1980's. The Plan documents and formalizes the goals and processes by which Georgetown will strive to enhance its quality of life. Its foundation is the mission statement and a set of End statements, similar to goals, which are divided into 15 policy areas. Mission statement and Enol, statements The City's Mission Statement serves as a broad statement of purpose. There are fifteen citizen defined policy areas with each area defined with a broad Policy End statement. Ends describe, in specific terms, desired end -states. The End statements are the vision of Georgetown at its very best and represent the ultimate target at which all activities of the City are aimed. Specific Council and citizen direction given in each area are calledFocus Ends. This term is used because these statements focus staff efforts in accomplishing the Policy Ends. Each policy area has one Policy End, but may have many or no Focus Ends because more detailed planning processes are on-going and can change these focus statements. Functional Plans The Century Plan is further defined through periodic updates and through the development of Functional Plan Elements that address the 15 policy areas. The Functional Plans are created by citizen work groups and provide more detailed direction for accomplishing the goals identified by the End statements. Generally, one functional plan is prepared and adopted each year. Each Functional Plan may address one or policy areas. The policy guidance from each new Functional Plan is incorporated into the Century Plan End Statements through new or revised Focus End statements. The Functional Plan elements adopted to date are Land Intensity Plan Economic Development Strategic Plan Facilities and Services Plan Airport Functional Plan Transportation and Utilities Plan Parks & Recreation Plan Urban Design Plan The Housing Plan will be presented to Council and adopted in 2000/01. The Century Plan and the Functional Plan elements are published and distributed as a separate document. Link to Annual Budget The City staff and elected and appointed City Officials rely on the Ends to provide direction and guidance for recommending and authorizing the expenditure of public funds. The budget is the Annual Operating Plan element of the Century Plan. It is prepared around the 15 policy areas, supporting Policy and Focus Ends and the Functional Plans for each area or set by the City Council at its priority ranking meeting in May, after collecting community feedback. Not all Policy and Focus Ends are addressed in each Annual Operating Plan element. The Annual Operating Plan specifically defines the methods or processes by which the City Manager and City staff will go about achieving the desired end -states for each policy area. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 Means ,Statements The methods or processes by which the desired end -states are achieved are called Means. The Means, similar to objectives or strategies, are the specific actions required to accomplish the Ends. The Means are identified through strategic planning sessions with the senior management team and key division staff guided by the Century Plan and Council priorities. The Annual Operating Plan Element is a detailed look at each operational area, or department, within the City and its own unique set of Means. These Means are included with each division and are listed by the Policy Area and End statement(s) it addresses. Each Means statement includes the dates over which the project or program will be implemented and the primary departments responsible for it. Five -Year Plans The City uses a five year planning horizon to prepare the capital projects program and financial forecasts. The five- year capital projects program and the anticipated funding sources are incorporated into and adopted with the Annual Operating Plan. The capital planning process is discussed in more detail with the Capital Projects section. Five-year financial forecasts are prepared to guide policy and priority decisions of staff and Council. The fmancial forecasts meet budget and financial policies (see Reference Section) and are based on historical trends, programs and projects outlined during the other planning processes, and reasonable economic and growth projections. The revenue forecasts from these models are included in the Financial Summary section. Governance Model The City of Georgetown has implemented the Century Plan through the adoption and use of a governance model. The governance model is an advanced approach to Council operations which provides for Council to set policies and Ends, while leaving the Means for accomplishing those Ends and policies to the City Manager and his staff. As long as Council defined "executive limitations" are not broached, the City's staff is able to use its best efforts and judgement to perform the Means to accomplish the Ends. The City Council has adopted a formal governance policy guiding this process. The pages that follow in this section provide an overview of the City's Mission Statement with its supporting Ends categorized under their respective policy areas. Means to each of the Ends are detailed in the Division/Department pages found later in this document. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 MISSION STATEMENT To preserve and enhance the quality of life and unique character of Georgetown by: • Preserving the rich heritage and natural resources; • Promoting well-planned development, cost effective professional management and competent, friendly services; and it Protecting its citizens, the environment and all other assets. The "Ends" Statements ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.01 Existing undeveloped sites in Georgetown are put to beneficial use. Focus End 1.02 Small and mid-sized commercial and industrial firms find Georgetown a welcoming business environment. Focus End 1.03 The Georgetown Industrial Foundation, Chamber of Commerce, local merchants, business associations, and other potential business partners are assured of cooperation and collaboration from the City. Focus End 1.04 Georgetown citizens have the opportunity to find employment in the Georgetown area. Focus End 1.05 Citizens and local employers are supported by the City in their efforts to develop appropriate job-related skills. Focus End 1.06 Financial and non-financial barriers to economic development in the City are removed. Focus End 1.06.01 The downtown is economically viable Focus End 1.06.02 Georgetown's unique character is preserved. Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 3 ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESO URCE CONSERVATION Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development: Focus End 2.01 Sufficient, high-quality water is available to meet the current and future needs of citizens and businesses in Georgetown. Priority is given to: 1) human consumption 2) businesses 3) recreation Focus End 2.02 Wildlife is conserved. GRO'L 7HAND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT Focus End 100 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. HISTORIC PRESERVATION Policy End 5.00 Prehistoric and historic resources are preserved, protected and promoted for the benefit of the citizens of Georgetown. TIM rrcrur Policy End 6.00 All citizens have access to safe and adequate housing opportunities. PUBLIC INFORMATION AND EDUCATION Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens. CITY SUMMARY 4 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 PUBLIC SAFETY Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Focus End 8.01 The response times and service levels for emergency services are compatible in all parts of the City. Focus End 8.02 Public safety services extend sufficiently beyond the City limits through governmental contracts to ensure that citizens in all parts of the City are adequately protected. Focus End 8.03 Citizens are safe from animal threat. Focus End 8.03.01 City provides humane animal accommodations. Focus End 8.04 Georgetown is prepared to respond to large-scale natural and technological emergencies. Focus End 8.05 Public safety services have a high level of citizen and volunteer involvement. RECREATIONAND CULTURAL AFFAIRS Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space, recreation facilities and services, and social and cultural activities contribute to an enhanced quality of life for the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.01 Park facilities meet the leisure needs of citizens while minimizing the negative impact on adjacent properties. Priority is given to: 1) Blue Hole/Imhoff Dam 2) A coordinated system of hikeibike and equestrian trails along the San Gabriel rivers and their tributaries Focus End 9.02 Georgetown has a City-wide open space system. Priority is to be given to: 1) the tributaries of the San Gabriel River (e.g. Smith Branch, Pecan Branch, Berry Creek) 2) preservation of key open space views 3) enhancement of park and recreational facilities 4) promotion of environmental conservation and/or protection 5) providing the City with a "land bank" 6) providing buffering from more intensive uses Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. TRANSPORTATION Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Focus End 10.01 The Georgetown Municipal Airport primarily serves the general aviation needs of the community. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 5 URBAN DESIGN Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.01 Georgetown's unique character is maintained and enhanced. Focus End 11.01.01 The design of new structures and remodels in special districts is respectful and complimentary to existing districts and designs. Focus End 11.01.02 The design of public works projects reflects a consistent City them and historic flavor and features locally available materials. Priority to be placed on: 1) lighting 2) distinctive street signs, etc. Focus End 11.01.03 Prominent landmarks can be viewed from major roadways, particularly: (1) the County Courthouse, (2) First United Methodist Church, and (3) Cullen Building at Southwestern University. Focus End 11.01.04 Development in special districts is in character with or compliments the existing area. Focus End 11.02 The visually intrusive impact of public, works projects and public and private utilities and facilities is minimized. Priority to be placed on: 1) stormwater drainage/management 2) utility lines (electric, telephone, cable TV, etc.) 3) street design Focus End 11.03 Significant community locations and special events are easily located by citizens and visitors to Georgetown. Focus End 11.04 Parks and open space forma City-wide open space system. Focus End 11.04.01 Located to serve citizens needs Focus End 11.04.02 Preserve key open space views Focus End 11.05 The planning and design process maximizes the safety, comfort and convenience of pedestrians. Focus End 11.06 Commercial buildings are planned, designed and maintained in a manner that does not detract from the City's unique character. Focus End 11.06.01 Site planning standards encourage large commercial buildings to be closer to the roadway, with a majority of large parking areas located to the side and rear of the primary structure. Focus End 11.06.02 Large buildings are articulated in a manner and style that is reflective of Georgetown's character. CITY SUMMARY 6 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Focus End 11.07 The impact of commercial and industrial land uses on single family neighborhoods are minimized. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Focus End 11.09 Parking lots do not detract from primary commercial structures. Focus End 11.09.01 Natural environmental conditions are integrated into the design and construction of public and private non-residential projects. Priority is given to: 1) standards and incentives for the preservation of healthy mature trees that are 4" or greater in caliper Focus End 11.09.02 Outside storage is effectively screened and unobtrusive. Focus End 11.10 Citizens of Georgetown have the opportunity to enjoy a diverse and affordable range of new neighborhood developments. UTILITIES/ENERGY Policy End 12.00 City owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Focus End 12.01 Customers of the City's electric utility have a range of choices with respect to rates, service levels and power supply options. Focus End 12.02 City water and wastewater customers in all certified areas receive services which exceed state and federal standards. Focus End 12.03 The City's stormwater drainage system efficiently and effectively protects the health and safety of Georgetown's residents and minimizes the negative effects of standing water and urban runoff. FACILITIES AND SERVICES Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Focus End 13.01 The City centralizes and co -locates services on existing City -owned property whenever possible. Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Focus End 13.03 The City provides appropriate, well managed information technology and services that support City operations and citizen access to information. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 7 FINANCE Policy End Focus End Focus End Focus End Focus End Focus End Focus End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future needs are provided. 14.01 Each utility system is a self -supported operation that provides a desirable and affordable level of service. 14.02 The City investigates the privatization of each City operation, as appropriate. 14.03 The City's utility rates are competitive with surrounding communities and with the statewide and national averages for comparable utility systems. 14.04 The tax rate is reasonable and fair and does not hinder economic development. 14.05 The City has a method for funding street and streetscape improvements. 14.06 The City pursues all federal and state grant programs which would benefit the City. GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS Policy End 15.00 A high level of cooperation and involvement exists among Georgetown's citizens and governmental organizations. Focus End 15.01 All citizens actively participate in governmental functions. Focus End 15.02 The City develops and coordinates service delivery policies with Williamson County, the Georgetown Independent School District and other organizations that provide services to Georgetown. Focus End 15.03 The City is a strong and visible participant in developing comprehensive solutions to issues of concern on a regional level. 4 4 CITY SUMMARY 8 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 4 GE�RG�T Nh �ED�-. ago This page intentionally left blank. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 9 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan (AOP) Calendar of Events for Budget Adoption & Implementation Planning and Preparation January - February *AOP process schedule set. March - April May June July Adoption August *Five-year strategic planning issues and assumptions identified by senior management team. *F&A and IR staff meets with divisions on ISF needs for 00/01. *Five-year capital projects plan updated using systems engineering models and citywide review team. *Five-year capital plan reviewed by City Manager and senior management team. *Mid -year Review of 1999/00 Annual Operating Plan presented to Council. *Town Hall meeting held. *Council Priority ranking sessions. *AOP instructions distributed to city divisions, and training sessions held. *Five-year financial forecast models updated. *Budget packages prepared in accordance with Council guidelines and Georgetown Century Plan. *Five-year Capital Improvements Plan presented to Council. *Council budget guidelines distributed to city staff. *Budget work sessions by Century Plan policy area conducted. *Preliminary AOP workshop process with Council - public input. *Revenue and expenditure projections finalized. *Council balances budget. *Tax roll finalized. *Property Tax Rate and revenue finalized. *Division and department sections completed and sent to Finance & Administration. *AOP draft prepared by Finance & Administration. *AOP draft and AOP Highlights booklet distributed to Council and public. *Council work session(s) on proposed draft conducted. *Public hearings on proposed budget and property tax rate held. September *Budget and tax rate ordinances presented to and adopted by Council. October 1 *Implement 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan. Budget amendments may be made during the year in accordance with state law and city charter. See detailed Budget Amendments requirements in the Budget and Financial Policies included in the Reference Section. Typically, budget amendments are proposed to Council as part of the Mid Year AOP Review in May of each year and at fiscal year end. CITY SUMMARY 10 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 FUNCTIONAL STRUCTURE This chart indicates in graphic form the flow of influence and function within the City. Our residents (shown at the top of the circle), speaking individually and through the many advisory boards (shown in the ovals in the top half of the diagram), affect and control the activities of City government through the elected City Council and Mayor. The Council exerts direct supervision over the City Manager, who in turn supervises the various divisions of the City to achieve the Ends desired by our residents. D E ^'rte � s .cQOcc�y Q�acL0 y0 S �a O- O� F' L• 7 . Sir P�/0 d�04 y 6 Employee & Organizational P a frPP� G Services Met Ma'�aint ° a Legal Safety Services Services �s �C s c ay . oc h C �'� a� lo§ L• 7 . Sir P�/0 d�04 y 'Ljs,/Or' s ro s z v iv P a frPP� G A dm�nrstr Faci/it �cc0unt atipn Met Ma'�aint ° a Legal porch U�rciAa/Benonce asin fou t Services Uti/it��ce e7ies �s C° � end ogetOwn A y , Ureav p visit°rs C`°'�5�0'L�O�� MAYOR MaryEllen Kersch CITY COUNCIL Lee Bain Mayor Pro Tem Charles Burson Susan Hoyt Clark Lyda Llorente Navarrette Sam Pfiester Ferd Tonn George Russell CITY MANAGER City Secretary Administration GaP`1aopepaio�\5 0k Operations Prevention & Community Analysis CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 y Municipal ro s z v iv Judge m W Legal • W F a Services a m 3 �s �C c ay . oc h C �'� a� lo§ C� hQ �5 Qac a`�oo cue �e Administration GaP`1aopepaio�\5 0k Operations Prevention & Community Analysis CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 BUDGETED NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES The 2000/01 Operating Plan will include 10 additional full-time positions and 2 upgraded positions. • Fire Services will add six new Firefighters and add a full-time Operations Chief/911 Addressing Coordinator; • Management Services will add two full-time positions in the Legal Department; • Employee & Organizational Services will upgrade the Administrative Assistant to Benefits Assistant; • Information Resources will add a full-time Webmaster position; • Community Services will upgrade a Shelter Attendant position to full-time. The detailed personnel schedule is located in the Reference section. 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 EMPLOYEES - Full Time / Part Time Full Time Equivalents) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 EMPLOYEES - By Division 2000/01 Budget Police Info Res Parks & Rec Mgt Svcs corn Svc Dev Svs Eco Devo F&A Fire 350.5 Total Full Time Equivalents CITY SUMMARY 12 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 OVERVIEW OF INDICATORS AND MEASURES The City has begun an ongoing process to measure its activities and success in accomplishing its Ends and Means. The measures will give the City a gauge to help determine the most effective programs as well as provide diagnostic information to management and Council to improve services and planning. Most of these measures are included with the individual departments. The following is a summary of overall indicators used in the City's planning processes. Over the next few years many of these indicators will be shifted to a more outcome focus and incorporated into departmental sections. PROJECTIONS Population and customer growth projections are based on estimates by the City's Long Range Planning staff, data from the Texas State Comptroller's Office and other recognized sources. POPULATION 95 '96 '97 98 99 w 01' 'Or '03' '04• 05' •Ro/ectM CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 18,000 16,000 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 UTILITY CUSTOMERS e I A 95 196 '97 N 199 '00 '01' '02' '03' '04' 05' —Electric —Water a Wastewater Sanitation Prqj�ded 13 RATE COMPARISONS COMBINED MONTHLY RATES (Utilities and Taxes on $139,930 Home) $325 $375 $425 $475 Pflugerville Round Rock GEORGETOWN Austin Cedar Park Leander 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 '94 195 196 '97 1% 99 '00 54Kol 1 $433 $435 $451 $465 ACTIVITY INDICATORS POLICE CALLS FOR SERVICE PROPERTY TAX RATE COMPARISON .a0 Pflugerville (.6424) Temple (.5922) Austin (.4633) Georgetown (.31409) 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 114 195 196 '97 '9a 199 100 .20 (.6975) (64) Park (.4996) Rock (.33) FIRE CALLS FOR SERVICE CITY SUMMARY 14 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 RECREATION ACTIVITY 2,500 2,250 2,000 1,750 1,500 1,250 1,000 750 500 250 0 55,000 50,000 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 '97 198 199 100 O Rec Center Memberships ->-- Program Activity 200,000,000 175,000,000 150,000,000 125,000,000 M 100,000,000 a 0 75,000,000 50,000,000 25,000,000 0 BULDING PERMITS '94 '95 '96 '97 198 199 100 O Value - -Permits CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 1,500 4,500 4,000 1,250 3,500 1,000 3,000 2,500 750 2,000 500 1,500 1,000 250 500 0 0 LIBRARY CIRCULATION '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 ANIMAL SERVICE CALLS '94 195 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 15 BENCHMARKING An important way to measure our economic condition is through benchmarking, which is a point of reference from which measurements or progress can be made. Benchmarking measures our progress from a point in time and is something that serves as a standard by which others may be measured. Information obtained from the Peer City Survey, (initiated by the City of Temple), allows us to compare ourselves to other cities. $0 Total Assessed. Value $1 $2 $3 $4, Ledmle $3.65 Tyler $3.36 Longvj'w = $324 Round Rock - $2.97 Denton $2.65_ N. Richland His $2,40 Collage Station $2.11 Bayman - $2.10 Mean $1.95 NUaia $1.90 Tangle $1.89 Bryan - $1.76 Galveston 51.75 GEORG 1$1.20 Pon AMur $1.10 Survey Malaga $2.27 f0 Net G.O. Debt $25 $50 $75 Baytown $62.6 N. Richland His $62.3 Round Rock $591 Denten f5A.0 Tetryk $371 Port Mhw $372 Lnimle $35.2 Colege SIAM fJ2.8 LongwkwW$$14.18 131.7 Killeen N $142 O+Neston f 139 "n $129 EORGETOYM $198 Victoria $0S Tyler $66 Surveymnga 535.0 - s9 Sales Tax per Capita $150 $300 Round Rork 538E N. Rktdand lige $281 Tykr $270 L0'ge," $249 Ler4svge $213 Tenpk $192 Denton $194 GaNestan 317! Colette slation $174 Warta N $142 Bryan f 139 Men $129 GEORGETOM $198 B+N'm $0S PartArthur $66 Surveylverapa $188 16 Net G.O. Debt per Capita Al $500 $1,000 $i NRkhlandM - -x $7,148 R=dRock $1.137 Brlloyn $858 Denton t.•-::..:-:ax:;:>:c:;;:-;>:-::.:.:•__ __ _ _ $784 Tenple $672 Port Arthur • .. e.•..:-::.:.-:- -:e -•::<-$835 GEORGETOWN $828 College SteAen LeWw*•::w �:.:x::v:;:�: •ae ....... $458 Longdew : $422 Uyeston -%:5313 Bryan ce - -` 5300 Gleen 5260 uaEoria $252 Tyler <•=<^:+ $177 SuveyMerage This survey is conducted in February and is based on historical information. Data is from 1998/99. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Ad Valorem Tax Rate $0.00 $025 $0.50 $0.75 Port Arthur 0.1 Baytown 0.7570 Wtlaria 0.7000 Bryan 0.8387 !Glean 0.8000 - N. Richland Hik 0.5700 Temple 0.5572 Galveston 0.5499 Longiiew 0.5334 Dentin O M LeWw44 0.4518 Collage 5tffion 0.4203 Round Rock 0.3830 GEORGETOWN 0.3500 Tyler0.2954 Survey Merage 0.5365 Net G.O. Debt per Capita Al $500 $1,000 $i NRkhlandM - -x $7,148 R=dRock $1.137 Brlloyn $858 Denton t.•-::..:-:ax:;:>:c:;;:-;>:-::.:.:•__ __ _ _ $784 Tenple $672 Port Arthur • .. e.•..:-::.:.-:- -:e -•::<-$835 GEORGETOWN $828 College SteAen LeWw*•::w �:.:x::v:;:�: •ae ....... $458 Longdew : $422 Uyeston -%:5313 Bryan ce - -` 5300 Gleen 5260 uaEoria $252 Tyler <•=<^:+ $177 SuveyMerage This survey is conducted in February and is based on historical information. Data is from 1998/99. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 IMPORTANCE The benchmarking survey compares cities with 50,000 or more population. Georgetown is included in the survey due to growth rate, being a public power city, and proximity to Austin. Growth comparison over the years is indicated in the graphs below. 3 Year Benchmark Comparison Georgetown Population Customer Growth Building Permits Issued Unemployment Rate Appraised Values =0� Total Tax Rate Streets Capital Costs Debt Service Tax Rate Then and Now 1990/91 97/98 98/99 99/00 Projected 98/99 vs 99/00 Population 25,500 26,400 28,000 6% increase Area (Square Miles) 23.6 23.7 23.8 .04% increase General Fund Budget $11,702,079 S12,006,868 $12,571,952 5% increase Total Assessed Value 5984,123,199 $1,199,831,232 S1,410,171,718 18% increase Ad Valorem Tax Rate $0.35 $0.35 $0.34 Stable Sales Tax Collections $2,415,396 S2,858,475 $3,250,000 14% increase Sales Tax Per Capita $95 $108 $116 7 % increase Georgetown Population Customer Growth Building Permits Issued Unemployment Rate Appraised Values =0� Total Tax Rate Streets Capital Costs Debt Service Tax Rate Then and Now 1990/91 2000/01 14,842 28,000 2% 6-10% 49 780 3.3 1.4 $335,775,697 $1,721,609,775 $0.39 $0.31 $130,378 $2,610,000 $0.13 $0.107 CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 17 LOCATION The City of Georgetown is located on IH -35 just 26 miles north of Austin in the northeastern corner of the scenic Texas Hill Country. Georgetown is the county seat of Williamson County which borders Travis County to the south and Bell County to the north. CITY SUMMARY 18 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 OVERVIEW Founded July 4, 1848, Georgetown was originally the agricultural trade center for the county and surrounding area. After the Civil War, Reconstruction brought prosperity to Georgetown through four main industries -- cattle, cotton, the university and the railroad. Georgetown has enjoyed consistent growth and development through the years. In recent years the City has become more industrialized and commercially oriented. Along with the commercial growth, Georgetown has successfully promoted tourism. Tourism has become a significant economic benefit to the community. The City of Georgetown has a 2000 estimated population of 28,600 within the city limits and an extraterritorial jurisdiction estimated population of 10,500. Georgetown is a Home Rule Charter City and operates under the Council -Manager form of government. A mayor and seven council members are elected from single -member districts. Elections are held the first Saturday in May. 50,000 40,000 30,000 0 0 20,000 a 10,000 0 A CENTURY OF GROWTH 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Medical services in Georgetown are provided by several agencies, public and private, and a large number of professional individuals. Georgetown Hospital, a 104 -bed full service medical facility with 225 admitting physicians, serves at the centerpiece for Georgetown Healthcare System, providing obstetrical, surgical, diagnostic and emergency services to the local area. The completion of the $9.5 million, 80,000 square foot expansion and renovation project increases the diagnostic, ambulatory care, and birthing capabilities. Also included is the Georgetown Cancer Treatment Center which provides medical and radiation oncology services that are close to home. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 19 46,000 28,600 14,842 a 9,441 3,096 2,871 3,583 4,945 5,218 6 395 3,682 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Medical services in Georgetown are provided by several agencies, public and private, and a large number of professional individuals. Georgetown Hospital, a 104 -bed full service medical facility with 225 admitting physicians, serves at the centerpiece for Georgetown Healthcare System, providing obstetrical, surgical, diagnostic and emergency services to the local area. The completion of the $9.5 million, 80,000 square foot expansion and renovation project increases the diagnostic, ambulatory care, and birthing capabilities. Also included is the Georgetown Cancer Treatment Center which provides medical and radiation oncology services that are close to home. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 19 HISTORIC GEORGETOWN The North and South San Gabriel Rivers, winding through the center of Georgetown, have always attracted people to this area. Spanish explorers noted the rivers and creeks here in the 1700s. The Tonkawa Indians and many other tribes chose this area for camp grounds. When pioneer settlers came to Texas, they found this spot where, in 1848, Georgetown was established. At first, Georgetown was a tiny, dusty town made up of shanties and crude log houses. Then, three things brought about monumental changes. First, Georgetown's location along a major cattle trail heading North to the famous Chisholm Trail brought business and settlers as the cattle industry boomed. Simultaneously, the railroads came to the area which aided in the growth of the agricultural industry. Growth boomed from 1880 to 1910. The downtown buildings were improved or replaced by fine Victorian structures. Most of our present downtown structures were built during this golden era in Georgetown's history. About 1920 growth slowed and many years passed with few changes. However, growth surged from the late 1970s to the early 1980s when two major events took place. First, Lake Georgetown was developed by the Army Corp of Engineers for flood control, recreation, and water supply. The Lake, now in full operation, has enhanced Georgetown's tourist and recreational capacity and ensures our future water supply. Secondly, Georgetown's participation in the Main Street Program propelled us into a second golden era during which almost all the downtown square and many older homes were restored to their Victorian splendor. CITY SUMMARY 20 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Since the 1980's Georgetown has been synonymous with Main Street, a downtown economic development effort administered through the Texas Historical Commission and the National Main Street Center. Over $30 million has been reinvested in our economy through the revitalization efforts of the downtown area. Private and public entities joined in partnership to restore and renovate downtown commercial structures, public buildings as well as building new structures to help anchor the commercial district. This unprecedented success has made our community the shining star of the Texas Main Street program and an example for small cities nationwide to follow. It has been the building block for Georgetown's recent economic development gains. In 1997, Georgetown was one of 5 cities nationwide to receive the prestigious Great American Main Street Award because of our exceptional accomplishments in the revitalization of our historic downtown. Georgetown was the first Texas town so recognized. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 21 After all this, it might seem time for Georgetown to rest on its laurels. Not a chance! As the people of Georgetown gear up for the 19th year of Main Street economic development, our successes continue to grow. The historic downtown post office has been saved and restored as city offices, the City and the Georgetown Heritage Society restored the famous Grace Episcopal Church and downtown special events like the Christmas Stroll continue to gain in popularity and status. Main Street Georgetown is moving forward and bettering its solid reputation as a first class tourist destination and shopping center. A_ t The Georgetown Square is considered by many to be the finest example in the state of a Victorian town square. Our historic square is certainly the magnet that draws I q people to Georgetown. However, once they're here, people soon realize there's much more to our community. It's a town with a strong identity and people who care about it... people that make sure we never stop trying to. enhance both Georgetown's appeal and the lives of those who choose to live here. int: k` INN M1, CITY SUMMARY 22 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 RECREATION Georgetown offers a wealth of recreation. In Georgetown there are currently twenty three city parks comprising nearly 380 total acres. The parks range from a half -acre neighborhood park to the one hundred -acre city wide San Gabriel Park. The parks include a wide range of facilities including: softball and baseball fields, soccer fields, playground equipment, individual and group picnic shelters, basketball and tennis courts, disc golf, a hike and bike trail and five swimming pools. The San Gabriel Park also has a community center, sunken garden, gazebo, football stadium, rodeo area, and a Creative Playscape for children. The Georgetown Recreation Center has a full basketball and volleyball court, two racquetball courts, a game room, weight room, kitchen, conference room and large and small activity rooms. The City purchased and opened the Georgetown Tennis Center in September 1999. The facility includes a full size swimming pool and baby pool, 11 tennis courts and activity center on 7 wooded acres. The City of Georgetown Parks and Recreation Division was chosen as the winner of the 1999 Gold Medal Award for excellence in recreation and park management Lake Georgetown, a 1200 -acre lake, is just a few minutes drive from any point in the City. The lake's three recreational areas are ideal for fishing, camping, picnicking and all types of water sports. Maintained by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lake Georgetown also has boat ramps, wilderness hiking trails, recreational vehicle hookups, and a large swimming beach. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 23 N' 4 y Lake Georgetown, a 1200 -acre lake, is just a few minutes drive from any point in the City. The lake's three recreational areas are ideal for fishing, camping, picnicking and all types of water sports. Maintained by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lake Georgetown also has boat ramps, wilderness hiking trails, recreational vehicle hookups, and a large swimming beach. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 23 There are five local golf courses. The private courses, Berry Creek Country Club and Georgetown Country Club each offer private 18 hole courses. Southwestern University has a six hole course open to the public and Legacy Hills Golf Course and White Wing Golf Course at Del Webb's Sun City Georgetown are Georgetown's newest 18 hole public courses. CULTURAL ACTWITIES Cultural activity thrives in Georgetown. Southwestern University's contribution of quality theater, dance, fine arts and lecture events add a valuable dimension to our cultural life. The Art deco -styled Palace Theatre, located on the downtown square, is currently being renovated and rejuvenated by townspeople. The Palace Theatre showcases events such as singing acts, plays, talent shows and every second Saturday of the month the Theatre hosts the Georgetown Opry. Georgetown always has a full calendar of local events including a fall Antique Show, a Fourth of July celebration with music, food and fireworks and ethnic celebrations. Other major annual events include the Christmas Stroll, Red Poppy Festival, and the Annual Airshow & Fly In. EDUCATION Georgetown Independent School District (GISD) serves the City and the surrounding area, having a current enrollment of 7,900 students. The District operates seven elementary schools, two middle schools,one ninth grade campus, one high school and one alternative educational school. There are also three private schools and one parochial school in the area. The public school system is exceptional in the quality of teachers and programs offered. The performance of GISD students is well above national averages. Georgetown boasts the highest SAT score in the Austin Metro Area. Georgetown has a strong vocational education program beginning in junior high school. On-the-job training away from campus is a vital part of the program. Vocational courses include electronics, business education, drafting, industrial cooperative training, agriculture, food service, homemaking, auto -mechanics, and welding. A Coordinated Vocational Academic Education program is also available for qualified high school students. Under the Tech Prep Program, students earn both high school and college credits while pursuing several vocational careers. CITY SUMMARY 24 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Georgetown is the home of Southwestern University, a private four-year undergraduate institution, offering a traditional liberal arts and sciences curriculum. The University has a current enrollment of 1,289 Located 10 blocks from the City's central business district, present facilities include some 37 buildings located on approximately 500 acres. SOUTHVEST.BR-N L;NIVERSITV t'LIAk-FFi.:1 5... - T_ Southwestern University has been named among 40 colleges across the nation in a book by former"New York Times" education editor Loren Pope, which focuses on schools which make significant impacts in the lives of their students. In Colleges That Change Lives, Pope, profiles 40 schools from the Northeast, South, Midwest, Southwest and Northwest regions through extensive on -campus research and interviews students, faculty, and staff at colleges nationwide. Southwestern is one of just three schools from the Southwest region to be included. Southwestern has also been ranked No. 10 in U.S. News & World Report's "Best College Values" listing within its category of National Liberal Arts Colleges. It is the only Texas school within its category to be included in the rankings. Money magazine recently named Southwestern as one of the nations' 100 "Best Buys." The 1997 Fiske Guide to Colleges placed Southwestern among 300 of the "best and most interesting" of America's 2000 four-year colleges and universities. Southwestern is also listed in The National Review College Guide's "America's Top 50 Liberal Arts College" The Princeton Review's "America's Best 306 Colleges," Barron' College Guide, Peterson's Competitive Colleges, Rugg§ Recommendation on the Colleges and the Templeton Honor Roll for Character Building Colleges. CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 25 GEORGETOWN'S TOP EMPLOYERS This list of the City's top employers indicates the increasingly diverse nature of the local economy. The City has played a major role in retaining and attracting new employers to the area. Governmental Manufacturing Williamson County 1,038 Advance Cable Services, LTD.* 50 City of Georgetown 322 Advance Metal Systems* 40 Airborne, Inc. 250 Educational Aircraft System Manufacturing 40 Chatsworth Products* 125 Georgetown ISD 1,250 Deaton Engineering/Design Southwestern University 450 & Assembly Concepts 50 House of Hatten 80 ,service Pioneer International Steel 80 Pringle & Associates 60 Del Webb's Sun City Georgetown 1,300 Manitwoc Boom Trucks 178 Georgetown Hospital 550 Mrs. Bairds 31 Georgetown Railroad 38 Reedholm Instruments, Inc.* 45 GTE Southwest 62 Sierra Microwave* 65 Texas Electric Cooperatives - Retail Transformer Division* 125 Albertsons 130 Triple S Plastics 300 HEB 245 Xycarb Ceramics USA * 85 Wal-Mart 150 * Assisted through state grants/loan guarantees arranged by and administered by the City. 4. CITY SUMMARY 26 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Miscellaneous ,Statistics Public Safety Police Fire Number of stations 1 4 Number of officers/firefighters 50 36 (exclusive of volunteer firefighters) Education Attendance Centers Number of students 12 7,900 Positions Adopted Full time 318.25 Part time 32.25 New construction building permits issued Oct. 99 - Sept. 2000 - 800 Total number of utility customers as of Sept. 30, 2000: Electric - 13,482 Water - 12,652 Sanitation- 11,101 Wastewater - 10,450 Infrastructure Miles of streets 340 Number of street lights 2,227 Miles of water mains 305 Miles of sanitary sewers 205 Miles of storm sewers 36 Miles of electric distribution lines 263 Annual electric sales - mWh 299,040 Peak demand - mW 73 Recreation & Culture Number of parks 23 Acres of parks 380 Number of libraries 1 public Number of volumes 69,888 Library circulation 276,453 Library visits 184,425 CITY SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 27 C) ,�z This page intentionally left blank. CITY SUMMARY 28 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 F�nanc�al ,Summary Jl� FINANCIAL SUMMARY TABLE OF CONTENTS Summary Where the Money Comes From..................................................................................................... 29 Where the Money Goes (by program)........................................................................................... 30 Where the Money Goes (by division)............................................................................................ 31 Comparison of Proposed Budget to Current Year........................................................................ 32 Revenues Property'faxes............................................................................................................................... 34 SalesTax........................................................................................................................................ 36 UtilityRevenues............................................................................................................................. 38 CapitalRecovery Fees................................................................................................................... 40 Other Enterprise Fund Revenues................................................................................................... 41 Other Miscellaneous Revenues...................................................................................................... 42 Fund Summaries AllFunds Summary .......................................................................................................................44 GeneralFund..................................................................................................................................46 StreetsFund................................................................................................................................... 48 ElectricFund.................................................................................................................................. 50 WastewaterFund........................................................................................................................... 52 WaterFund.................................................................................................................................... 54 AirportFund.................................................................................................................................. 56 SanitationFund..............................................................................................................................57 StormwaterDrainage Fund............................................................................................................ 58 General Capital Projects Funds..................................................................................................... 59 SpecialRevenue Funds.................................................................................................................. 60 InternalService Funds................................................................................................................... 61 Where The Money Comes From 2000-2001 Fund Balance Use 19% Service Improvement Fees 2% Other Revenue 8% Property Taxes Interfund Transfers 6% 8% Sales Taxes s - New Debt /o rges for Services 9% Capital Recovery Fees 1% enues 99/00 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 Amended Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Property Taxes Sales Taxes Bond Proceeds - New Debt Charges for Services Capital Recovery Fees Utility Revenues Grants Other Revenue Service Improvement Fees Fund Balance Used Interest Interfund Transfers Totals 4,224,047 4,803,050 4,821,499 5,106,500 5,874,500 2,858,475 2,725,000 3,250,000 3,600,000 3,950,000 8,250,000 6,035,000 5,701,523 2,204,500 6,378,500 6,141,623 6,915,711 6,922,480 7,494,879 7,497,619 655,117 433,125 695,000 433,125 433,125 30,308,383 31,119,385 32,152,300 33,512,574 35,858,181 307,570 800,164 796,052 941,259 78,255 5,739,882 5,954,909 6,895,408 6,510,252 6,594,423 1,312,068 1,855,280 1,442,680 1,493,545 1,493,545 506,536 11,650,443 (180,721) 16,042,927 (386,907) 1,652,607 1,109,411 1,556,701 1,233,034 1,112,252 6,905,125 8,323,463 8,354,364 6,829,976 6,961,824 68,861,433 81,724,941 72,407,286 85,402,571 75,845,317 FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 29 Police Ser 5% Administration 10% Development Servic 2% Parks & Recrt 3% Budget by Program 2000-2001 Electric ono/ Public Library 32% r ion irmwater Drainage 1% Debt Payments 8% Airport 2% Fire Services 4% Comm Svc -Others 1% Budget Total By Program 65,384,560 100.0% 69,953,327 100.0% Interfund Transfers & Premiums 16,340,381 15,449,244 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 81,724,941 85,402,571 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 30 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Amended Adopted 1999/00 Budget % 2000/01 Budget % Police Services 3,380,914 5.2% 3,433,743 4.9% Streets 781,265 1.2% 1,172,644 1.71/6 Electric 13,201,479 20.2% 14,324,040 20.5% Public Library 661,385 1.0% 697,383 1.0% Water 2,842,353 4.3% 3,233,266 4.6% Wastewater 1,329,680 2.0% 1,380,377 2.0% Sanitation 1,761,322 2.7% 2,252,595 3.2% Stormwater Drainage 201,565 0.3% 196,378 0.3% Debt Payments 4,645,923 7.1% 5,681,022 8.1% Airport 913,522 1.4% 999,331 1.4% Fire Services 2,213,677 3.4% 2,589,988 3.7% Comm Svc -Others 935,290 1.4% 736,826 1.1% Capital Improvements 23,508,136 36.0% 22,417,285 32.0% Parks & Recreation 2,026,792 3.1% 2,256,432 3.2% Development Services 1,213,709 1.9% 1,232,605 1.8% Administration 5,767,548 8.8% 7,349,412 10.5% Budget Total By Program 65,384,560 100.0% 69,953,327 100.0% Interfund Transfers & Premiums 16,340,381 15,449,244 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 81,724,941 85,402,571 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 30 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Budget By Division 2000-2001 Community Services . 6% P„rr.hncer1 Pnwer WOT n Economic Develonment Information Res( 1% Management Servica 4% Community Owned Utilities 14% Development 2% Int Development Services Community Owned Utilities Management Services Information Resources Purchased Power (COU) Community Services Economic Development Capital Improvements Parks & Recreation Finance & Administration Fire Services Debt Payments Police Services Interfund Charges & Transfers Totals 9%v V Police Services Debt Payments 5% 7% ,apital Improvements 25% & Recreation 3% Administration 4% FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 31 99/00 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 Amended Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 1,271,215 1,348,244 1,302,286 1,374,276 1,369,176 9,416,034 11,197,009 10,878,605 12,572,859 12,598,760 1,768,245 2,244,951 2,051,844 3,039,418 3,222,892 858,869 983,307 983,307 1,136,326 1,065,526 11,584,455 11,597,040 12,083,700 12,542,100 13,095,500 4,039,041 4,739,903 4,768,995 5,186,315 5,106,742 0 0 0 351,756 351,756 17,353,731 23,508,136 14,360,574 22,417,285 12,233,500 1,795,930 2,330,092 2,247,876 2,588,906 2,444,463 3,144,077 3,212,408 3,181,588 3,480,822 3,390,792 2,389,632 2,543,936 2,513,478 2,993,767 2,993,172 3,674,494 4,645,923 4,635,844 5,681,022 5,897,240 3,626,871 3,949,322 3,863,899 4,083,354 3,989,585 7,938,839 9,424,670 9,535,290 7,954,365 8,086,213 68,861,433 81,724,941 72,407,286 85,402,571 75,845,317 FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 31 COMPARISON OF PROPOSED BUDGET TO CURRENT YEAR OVERALL Divisions were required to keep base budgets at or below current levels for most operating costs. The costs from outside contracts, such as treatment plant operations and automatic meter reading maintenance contract costs , rose slightly due to the continued growth in customers and property. Personnel costs, such as the annualized cost of 1999/00 merit -based pay increases given in January and an approximate 7% increase in employee health insurance, caused slight increases across the board. Other significant changes are summarized below. 1999/00 2000/01 Amended Adopted Increase/ Buffet Budijet Decrease Explanation COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES $11,197,009 $12,572,859 $1,375,850 Maintenance accounts for Street ($250,000), Water ($108,000) and Wastewater ($158,000) were moved from the CIP budget to the departmental budgets in 2000/01. The proposed budget also includes $300,000 for CIS software and $480,000 for annual maintenance of the new automated meter reading system. PURCHASED POWER 11,597,040 12,542,100 945,060 Costs rise annually with addition of approximately 750 new customers each year and are offset by electric sales revenue. COMMUNITY SERVICES 4,739,903 5,186,315 446,412 The growth in Airport fuel sales and sanitation contract costs due to rising customer bases have increased costs. Both are offset by proportional increases in revenue. The Convention and Visitors' Bureau (CVB), along with the Main Street function, moved to the new Economic Development Division in 2000/01. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 1,348,244 1,374,276 26,032 The 1999/00 merit increases for staff have caused a slight increase in expenses for the division. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 351,756 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 3,212,408 3,480,822 32 351,756 This is a new division for 2000/01. Previously CVB expenses were captured in the Community Services division. 268,414 Roof replacements at the Tennis Center and Community Center, along with carpet replacement in the Municipal Building, are included in the Facilities Maintenance Fund as additional maintenance expenses needed for 2000/01. The addition 6f a court fees Special Revenue Fund to account for legally restricted court taxes also represents an increase for this division. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 1999/00 2000/01 Amended Adopted, Budjjet Buddet FIRE SERVICES $2,543,936 $2,993,767 INFORMATION RESOURCES 983,307 1,136,326 MANAGEMENT SERVICES 2,244,951 3,039,418 PARKS & RECREATION 2,330,092 POLICE SERVICES 3,949,322 Increase Decrease Explanation $449,831 Six additional firefighters, an operations chief position and operating costs for Fire Station 4 were added in 2000/01. 153,019 Network hardware replacement costs, as well as annual software maintenance agreements, have increased for this division. 794,467 The proposed budget includes $550,000 of salary and benefits for the employee pay for performance system. This amount will be distributed to departments in January when individual amounts are known. An additional $200,000 was also allocated by City Council to be used towards improvement of employee benefits. 2,588,906 258,814 The construction costs for completing the hike and bike trail and athletic complex, which were originally budgeted in 1998/99, are offset by a full year of operational costs for the hike and bike trail, Village Pool and Georgetown Tennis Center. Also included are the costs of two positions that were originally funded through grants. 4,083,354 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 23,508,136 22,417,285 DEBT PAYMENTS 134,032 Operating expenses remain level, while payroll expense related to merit raises for staff has increased. (1,090,851) Amounts fluctuate from year to year depending on the nature and timing of projects. 4,645,923 5,681,022 1,035,099 Combined tax -supported and self-supporting general obligation debt, along with utility revenue debt, payments have risen by the new debt issues in 1999/00 and scheduled increases in debt payments. INTERFUND NONDEPT'L CHARGES 1,101,207 1,124,389 INTERFUND TRANSFERS 8,323,463 6,829,976 23,182 The administrative allocations rise as overall costs for support services provided to the General Fund rise. (1,493,487) Council directed a decrease in transfers to the General Fund to provide better economic strength and to match program revenues to program expenses. The City will continue to work on this effort through a competitive fee analysis to be completed in 2000/01. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 33 Property Tax Revenues 8.000,000 6,000,000 4,000,000 2,000,000 0 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00 00/01' 01/02' 02/03' 03/04* 04/05' *Projected Taxable Property Values 2,500,000,000 2,000,000,000 1,500,000,000 1,000,000,000 500,000,000 0 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00 00/01' 01/02' 02/03' 03/04' 04/05' -Projected FINANCIAL SUMMARY 34 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Fiscal Year 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00 00/01 01/02' 02/03* 03/04* 04/05* Property Tax Revenues: (in thousands) General Fund 747 1,045 1,593 1,908 2,241 2,430 3,130 2,769 2,865 2,955 Streets 178 253 443 597 700 800 900 956 1,030 1,105 Debt Service 1,060 1,168 1,360 1,711 1,862 1,887 1,854 2,313 2,416 2,307 Property Values: (in millions) Existing Property 518 561 775 1,039 1,313 1,519 1,678 1,821 1,969 2,120 New & Annexed 21 92 210 156 114 110 90 90 90 90 Property Tax Rates Per $100 -taxable 0.370 0.379 0.350 0.350 0.340 0.31409 0.334 0.331 0.321 0.303 valuation * Projected Taxes are levied January leach year and are past due on February lof the following year. Property tax rolls are certified in July and the tax rate is adopted in September along with the Annual Operating Plan. Taxable values have risen steadily due to rapid residential and commercial growth since 1994. => New construction permits averaged 800-1,200/year since 1996. Growth outlook is expected at 750 annually. => Values on existing property have risen annually 18% on average the last 3 years. 2000/01 new values include: $109 million new construction $1 million annexations Adopted property tax rate for 2000/01 is $0.31409/$100 valuation. 0% increase over the effective rate of $0.31409. => Maintenance & Operations (M&O) $0.19847 for 2000/01 is deposited to General & Street SRF Funds** => Debt Service $0.11562 for 2000/01 is deposited to General Debt Service Fund **Beginning in 1994/95, the City began a 5 year transition plan to dedicate $0.05 of the M&O portion of the tax rate to transportation. This goal was accomplished in 1998/99. Future Projections: => Based on continued new property growth of $90 million annually with a 3% annual increase in valuations. Growth projections are reviewed semiannually and adjusted as needed. => No annexations are included. => Tax rates include debt needs for street and facility capital improvements as shown on the 5 -year Street and General Capital Projects schedules. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 35 Sales Tax Revenue 04/05* 03/04* 02/03* 01/02* 00/01* 99/00* 98/99 97/98 96/97 95/96 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 *Projected The City receives 1% of the 7.25% sales and uses taxes for general operating purposes. The remaining 6.25% is collected and retained by the State of Texas. The City's sales tax base is diverse with revenues being generated by national grocery and other retailers, building supply stores, utilities, etc. The heavy residential growth over the past few years has also created a demand for more restaurants and retailers, which have expanded the City's tax base. Sales tax receipt increases average 14% annually for the past five years. _> 1999/00 sales tax receipts expected to exceed prior year by 13.6%. _> Future revenues are projected at 6 - 10% annually. 36 FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 O� GEORG\ \D D This page intentionally left blank. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 37 Electric Revenue 01. nnn nnn 93/94 94195 95/96 96197 97196 98/99 99/00• 00101' 01/02' 02103' 03104' 04105' Water Revenue $10,000,000 $6.000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000 $2,000,000 $0 38 *Projected 93194 94/95 95/96 96197 97/98 98/99 99100` 00/01' 01102' 02/03• 03/04' 04/05' *Projected FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 m _------$8-Of '$7.75M $7.45M 'S7.30M '56.72M •$6.79M S6.39M $6.47M $5.92M $5.48M S4.22M $3.81 M 93194 94/95 95/96 96197 97/98 98/99 99100` 00/01' 01102' 02/03• 03/04' 04/05' *Projected FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Wastewater Revenue $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $0 'S4.39M 'S4.56M '54.40M 'S4.00M `S3.SOM $3.55M $3.39M 93/94 94/95 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00' 00/01* 01/02' 02/03` 03/04' 04/05' *Projected Revenues include charges for services including tap or hookup fees. Developer contributions (such as capital recovery fees) and interest are presented on a separate schedule. Generally, utility revenue projections are based on projected customer growth for each utility.Because the City of Georgetown provides services outside its incorporated boundaries, customer growth can exceed population growth. Conversely, annexations usually do not impact the utility customer base. Electric and Water Revenue Projections: => Calculated on a four-year rolling average of per capita consumption. => Highly subject to variations in weather conditions. => Shortfalls due to weather are generally adjusted in the following year's scheduled projects. => Assumes 5% growth for Electric through the next five years, as the City adjusts to a deregulated market. => Assumes 6% customer growth in Water for the next two years and reduced to 4% for three years. The ground and surface water supply is adequate through build out of the City's existing certificated water service area. Major treatment and system expansions will be made as growth occurs and are included in the 5 -year capital improvements schedule. The City continues to be proactive in planning for regional water needs. Wastewater Revenue Projections: => Based on average monthly billings adjusted for customer growth. => Assumes 6% customer growth for the next two years and reduced to 4% for three years. The new Pecan Branch plant is scheduled for construction in 2000/09 to accomodate the growth in customers. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 39 Capital Recovery Fee Revenue $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 Service Improvement Fees $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 94/95 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00' 00/01' 01/02' 01/02' 03/04' 04/05' "Projected Fiscal Year 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00* 00/01* 01/02* 02/03* 03/04* 04/05* (in thousands) Service Improvement Fees: Water 1,313 1,017 866 632 747 798 798 798 798 798 Wastewater 803 622 530 386 395 395 395 395 395 395 Total 2,116 1,639 1,396 1,018 1,142 1,193 1,193 1,193 1,193 1,193 Impact Fees: Water N/A 169 204 410 415 268 268 268 268 268 Wastewater N/A 106 135 245 280 165 165 165 165 165 Total N/A 275 339 655 695 433 433 433 433 433 Service Improvement Fees: => Del Webb Collected from Del Webb's Sun City Georgetown on a per unit basis to offset cost of infrastructure improvements to serve the development. The fees, similar to impact fees, are collected for water, wastewater, streets and fire improvements as part of the development agreement for the 12 - 15 year project. => Water Service Improvement Fees $1,986 per unit => Wastewater Service Improvement Fees $1,215 per unit Street and fire fees are not significant and are presented as part of other revenues. => Esca/ara Ranch Collected from the developer on a per unit basis to offset cost of Water infrastructure improvements to serve the development. The fee of $3,391 per unit will be collected as the buildout continues. Impact Fees: In 1996, the City adopted water and wastewater impact fees under Chapter 395 of the Texas Local Government Code. These revenues are used as partial funding for qualifying water and wastewater infrastructure projects. FINANCIAL SUMMARY 40 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Other Enterprise Fund. Revenues $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 94/95 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00* 00/01' 01/02* *Projected Fiscal Year 94/95 95/96 96/97 97198 98199 99100* 00/01* 01/02* (in thousands) Stormwater Drainage 100 260 327 461 616 669 716 736 Airport 379 458 603 596 724 1,220 1,386 1,346 Sanitation 1,147 1,292 1,507 1,680 1,910 2,071 2,538 2,635 Sanitation Revenue: Sanitation revenue includes fees collected for curbside pick-up and recycling, special pick-ups and dumping fees at the City's collection station. Rates are expected to increase in November to offset rising operational costs by the City's sanitation contractor. Growth in the City's customer base continues to be steady. Airport Revenue: Airport revenue consists primarily of fuel sales, T -hangar rentals and tie -down fees. A 63 -space T -hangar facility was completed in January 2000, to accommodate demand for hangar rental space, therefore increasing revenues. Stormwater Drainage: Revenue for stormwater drainage is collected on a per unit basis to pay for the maintenance of drainage, detention and filtration infrastructure. This fee also funds debt service payments for bonds previously issued for capital improvement projects. Fees apply within the incorporated city limits and the growth will be consistent with other utility customer growth. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 41 Other Miscellaneous Revenues $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $0 94/95 95/96 96197 97/98 98/99 99100' 00/01' 01/02' *Projected Fiscal Year 94195 95196 96/97 97/98 98/99 99100* 00101* 01102* (in thousands) Interest Income 683 1,054 819 1,296 1,653 1,557 1,233 1,112 Grant Revenue 630 540 1,212 1,184 308 796 941 78 Miscellaneous Revenue 1,774 2,868 2,474 4,136 2,848 3,274 2,909 2,947 Interest Income => Revenue peaked in 1998/99 due to the investment of proceeds from 1998 and 1999 bond issues. Interest revenue declines as projects are completed and bond proceeds are spent. => Interest revenues are projected based on anticipated cash balances available from: *Fund balances *Bond proceeds *Contingency reserves *Debt service funds Grant Revenue The City receives grants for a variety of purposes including law enforcement, emergency management, tree planting, parks and airport construction. Grant revenue is projected based on pending and approved grant commitments. Miscellaneous Revenue => Includes one time increases, such as the investment income from the sale of assets originally purchased for an economic development project in 1997/98. Miscellaneous fees are expected to remain stable for 2000/01 and include revenues and funding sources not appropriate to other categories and also the following specific revenues: *Franchise fees *Building permits *Fines *Building permits *Mapping fees *Donations *Surplus property sales *Platting fees *Other user fees *Parks & recreation charges *HoteUmotel taxes FINANCIAL SUMMARY 42 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 4. 4 GEORG�T �D This page intentionally left blank. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 43 General Special Capital Total General Revenue Projects Budget Fund Funds Funds Beginning Fund Balances ! 25,969,210 3,250,201 728,433 4,973,517 Working Capital ;p SOURCES & REVENUES: Property taxes 5,106,500 2,430,000 820,500 Sales taxes 3,600,000 3,600,000 Bond Proceeds 2,204,500 1,130,000 Charges for Services 7,494,879 929,714 Capital Recovery Fees 433,125 rT Special Improvement Fees 1,493,545 300,625 LLi Utility Revenues 33,512,574 Grants 941,259 793,809 Interest 1,233,034 128,403 46,240 185,051 Other Revenue 6,510,252 1,163,729 2,161,942 Interfund Transfers 6,829,976 4,121,500 272,026 795,000 Total Revenues 69,359,644 12,373,346 4,094,517 2,410,676 i USES & EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities 12,572,859 1,547,221 fid Purchased Power 12,542,100 i Community Services 5,186,315 1,575,212 54,644 k� Development Services 1,374,276 1,374,276 Economic Development 351,756 351,756 Finance & Administration 3,480,822 159,669 20,000 Fire Services 2,993,767 2,993,767 Information Resources 1,136,326 13,367 Management Services 3,039,418 896,910 Parks & Recreation 2,588,906 1,552,508 1,036,398 Police Services 4,083,354 3,908,790 174,564 Capital Improvements 22,417,285 650,000 7,384,193 Debt Payments 5,681,022 Interfund Nondepartmental Chrg 1,124,389 1,124,389 Interfund Transfers 6,829,976 38,026 715,000 $7 Total Uses & Expenses 85,402,571 13,623,547 4,562,950 7,384,193 I Ending Fund Balance/ 9,926,283 2,000,000 260,000 0 P� Working Capital RESERVATIONS: Contingency 8,500,000 2,000,000 260,000 Capital Projects/Other 1,426,283 Available Fund Balance/ 0 0 0 0 Working Capital Employees - Full Time Equivalents 350.50 201.75 38.50 0.00 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 44 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 General Debt Other Internal Service Electric Wastewater Water Enterprise Service Fund Fund Fund Fund Funds(1) Funds Beginning Fund Balances / 625,913 4,619,398 6,340,192 4,099,191 975,383 356,982 Working Capital SOURCES & REVENUES: Property taxes 1,856,000 Sales taxes Bond Proceeds 1,074,500 Charges for Services 6,565,165 Capital Recovery Fees 165,000 268,125 Special Improvement Fees 394,875 798,045 Utility Revenues 19,543,796 4,000,000 6,715,000 3,253,778 Grants 147,450 Interest 58,000 236,253 261,675 203,048 35,809 78,555 Other Revenue 748,550 376,600 433,190 1,572,901 53,340 Interfund Transfers 825,450 816,000 Total Revenues 1,914,000 21,603,099 6,023,600 8,564,858 4,862,488 7,513,060 USES & EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities 3,119,282 2,153,576 4,294,252 475,106 983,422 Purchased Power 12,542,100 Community Services 3,556,459 Development Services Economic Development Finance & Administration 3,301,153 Fire Services Information Resources 1,122,959 Management Services 2,142,508 Parks & Recreation Police Services Capital Improvements 3,349,150 7,930,000 2,315,730 788,212 Debt Payments 1,887,462 996,165 1,118,916 1,310,217 368,262 Interfund Nondepartmental Chrg Interfund Transfers 2,815,800 286,300 2,413,850 241,000 320,000 Total Uses & Expenses 1,887,462 22,822,497 11,488,792 10,334,049 5,429,039 7,870,042 Ending Fund Balance/ 652,451 3,400,000 875,000 2,330,000 408,832 0 Working Capital RESERVATIONS., Contingency 3,400,000 875,000 1,700,000 265,000 Capital Projects/Other 652,451 630,000 143,832 Available Fund Balance/ 0 0 0 0 0 0 Working Capital Employees - Full Time Equivalents 0.00 17.00 7.00 8.00 11.75 66.50 (1) includes Airport, Sanitation and Storrnwater Drainage Funds FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 45 46 General Fund. 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 2,241,091 2,430,000 Beginning Fund Balance 3,425,671 2,239,332 2,632,703 3,250,201 2,000,000 REVENUES: 1,460,108 1,454,944 1,575,212 1,509,212 1,271,215 Property Taxes 1,907,978 2,264,000 2,241,091 2,430,000 3,130,000 Sales Taxes 2,858,475 2,725,000 3,250,000 3,600,000 3,950,000 Interest 119,868 112,883 112,883 128,403 136,592 Administrative Charges 734,213 821,549 815,380 929,714 929,714 All Other Revenue 1,259,418 1,027,375 1,228,138 1,163,729 1,236,138 Tfs In - Return on Investment 1,977,406 2,041,025 2,096,500 2,159,100 2,242,450 Transfers In - Other 1,794,597 3,340,788 3,340,788 1,962,400 1,910,000 Total Revenues 10,651,955 12,332,620 13,084,780 12,373,346 13,534,894 EXPENSES: Community Services Development Services Finance & Administration Fire Services Management Services Parks and Recreation Police Services Interfund Nondept'I Chrg Transfers Out Total Expenses 1,268,917 1,460,108 1,454,944 1,575,212 1,509,212 1,271,215 1,348,244 1,302,286 1,374,276 1,369,176 133,671 156,040 155,125 159,669 159,669 2,389,632 2,543,936 2,513,478 2,993,767 2,993,172 612,825 717,405 707,654 896,910 882,910 1,247,453 1,482,419 1,439,424 1,552,508 1,552,577 3,377,274 3,600,758 3,553,684 3,908,790 3,908,790 1,033,714 1,101,207 1,180,926 1,124,389 1,124,389 110,222 161,835 159,761 38,026 34,999 11, 444, 923 12,571,952 12,467,282 13,623,547 13, 534,894 Ending Fund Balance 2,632,703 2,000,000 3,250,201 2,000,000 2,000,000 RESERVATIONS: Contingency 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 Available Fund Balance 632,703 0 1,250,201 0 0 FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Revenues 2000/01 Expenditures 2000/01 Tfr In- Other 1d°i Tfr In - Retum on Inv. 16% Fur Balai 90, Admin Charges 7% Interest & n+k. Sales Taxes 27% Property Taxes 18% Police Svcs 28.7% Intfd NoCnh ept'I Transfers Com Svcs 8.3% 0.3% 11.6% 6.6% Parks 11.4% 3V Svcs 10.1% F&A 1.2% -e Svcs >2.0% Punct. Description: The General Fund is used to account for resources traditionally associated with government which are not required legally or by sound financial management to be accounted for in another fund. Significant Issues/Comments: => Fire Services opened a temporary station at the Airport in 1999/00 to provide fire protection in that area. The permanent facility for Fire Station 4 is expected to be completed in December 2000 and will require $260,000 in staffing and operational costs. In 2000/01, an additional six firefighters will be hired, along with an operations chief, to alleviate staffing issues. => The Police Services budget increased as the City assumes the full funding for five police officers originally hired through a U.S. Department of Justice Community Oriented Policing Services grant. => Parks and Recreation assumed funding for two previously grant funded positions when the grants expired September 30, 2000. => $150,000 of contingency funds, used at the Council's discretion, have been included in the City Council depart- ment budget. The funding for council contingency was previously budgeted in the utility funds. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 47 48 Streets Puna. EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities - Streets 985,936 1,127,045 99/00 00/01 01/02 Transfers Out - Capital Projects 98/99 99100 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 1,710,801 1,798,045 1,764,495 2,262,221 2,186,221 Ending Fund Balance Beginning Fund Balance 354,556 214,047 273,189 386,674 153,000 REVENUES: Contingency Property Taxes (Dedicated) 597,246 671,000 700,358 800,000 900,000 Franchise Fees 986,365 1,047,272 1,141,689 1,198,547 1,267,721 Interest 16,049 7,793 25,000 30,000 18,500 Grant Revenue Transfers In 29,774 10,933 10,933 Total Revenues 1,629,434 1,736,998 1,877,980 2,028,547 2,186,221 EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities - Streets 985,936 1,127,045 1,093,495 1,547,221 1,411,221 Transfers Out - Capital Projects 724,865 671,000 671,000 715,000 775,000 Total Expenses 1,710,801 1,798,045 1,764,495 2,262,221 2,186,221 Ending Fund Balance 273,189 153,000 386,674 153,000 153,000 RESERVATIONS: Contingency 153,000 153,000 153,000 153,000 Available Fund Balance 273,189 0 233,674 0 0 FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Franchi Fee 58.7% Revenues 2000/01 Fund Balance Interest Puna. Description: Expenditures 2000/01 'roperty Transfer Tax 38% 37.5% )perations 62% The Streets Special Revenue Fund (SRF) was created in 1996/97 as part of the City's effort to dedicate sufficient financial resources to street repair and maintenance, as well as to track funds received for use of public rights-of-way. => Five cents of the City's $0.31409 property tax rate is dedicated to streets. => Franchise fees from service providers (telephone, gas, cable TV, etc.) and city -owned utilities are deposited directly to the Streets SRF because these fees are reimbursements to the City for rental of streets and rights-of-way, as well as, for added wear and tear due to street cuts and traffic diversions. => Street Department personnel and operating costs are included in this fund. => Any excess funds are transferred to Streets Capital Projects for transportation system expansion and improvements. Significant Issues/Comments: ` => Transfers Out are made to Streets -General Capital Projects to fund the 2000/01 portion of the 5 -year capital improvements plan. => Revenue from property taxes and franchise fees continues to rise due to growth in appraised valuation and the increasing number of utility customers. => Beginning in 2000/01, the $250,000 normally budgeted for unscheduled street repairs and maintenance has been moved from the capital projects fund to the Streets SRF. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 49 50 Electric Fund, 99/00 00101 01/02 98199 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 1,566,523 1,074,500 Beginning Working Capital 6,353,361 4,717,383 5,242,470 4,619,398 3,400,000 REVENUES: Electric Services 17,843,712 18,408,000 18,822,000 19,543,796 20,789,163 Bond Proceeds 11,584,455 1,530,000 1,566,523 1,074,500 1,975,500 Interest 329,214 255,904 232,520 236,253 236,115 All Other Revenue 646,324 754,643 789,350 748,550 768,550 Transfers In 8,198 7,355 7,355 2,815,800 2,918,700 Total Revenues 18,827,448 20,955,902 21,417,748 21,603,099 23,769,328 EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities 2,612,879 2,839,566 2,821,738 3,119,282 3,131,882 Purchased Power 11,584,455 11,597,040 12,083,700 12,542,100 13,095,500 Capital Projects 2,752,871 3,709,535 2,982,268 3,349,150 3,483,500 Debt Payments 495,416 681,914 681,914 996,165 1,139,746 Transfers Out 2,492,718 3,445,230 3,471,200 2,815,800 2,918,700 Total Expenses 19,938,339 22,273,285 22,040,820 22,822,497 23,769,328 Ending Working Capital 5,242,470 3,400,000 4,619,398 3,400,000 3,400,000 RESERVATIONS: Contingency 3,000,000 3,400,000 3,400,000 3,400,000 3,400,000 Other Available Working Capital 2,242,470 0 1,219,398 0 0 FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 F Bal I Revenues 2000/01 InterestOther Bond 1% 3% Proceeds CICI.0 Il. Services 86% Fund. Description: Debt Paymen 4% Capital Projects 15% Expenses 2000/01 Transfers 100/ Operating 14% Power 55% The Electric Fund is used to account for the revenues from all operating and maintenance activities of the utility and the expenses of the departments which support those activities. This includes the the Electric department, purchased power costs, debt payments and capital projects. The fund also makes transfers out to other funds as directed by the City Council. ,Significant Issues/Comments: =>The Customer, Choice and Control (CCC) system for automated meter reading was completed during 2000. The annual maintenance costs for Electric are estimated at $240,000, plus an additional $100,000 for meters for new growth. => Purchased power costs continue to increase proportionally with the growth in customer base. => Capital projects are funded through operating revenues and debt when needed. In 2000/01, $1,100,000 of operating revenue is used for capital projects. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 51 Wastewater Fund. 99/00 00/01 01102 98199 99100 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 3,800,000 4,000,000 4,400,000 Beginning Working Capital 4,345,249 2,992,887 3,112,330 6,340,192 875,000 REVENUES: 1,946,604 2,177,828 2,177,827 2,153,576 2,386,302 Wastewater Services 3,551,945 3,658,000 3,800,000 4,000,000 4,400,000 Bond Proceeds 575,943 1,285,000 1,285,000 1,118,916 1,130,389 Capital Recovery Fees 244,682 165,000 280,000 165,000 165,000 Special Improvement Fees 386,370 516,375 394,875 394,875 394,875 Interest 360,524 183,361 263,463 261,675 163,441 All Other Revenue 398,820 337,730 518,413 376,600 380,600 Transfers In 440,360 1,409,997 1,409,997 825,450 570,375 Total Revenues 5,382,701 7,555,463 7,951,748 6,023,600 6,074,291 EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities 1,946,604 2,177,828 2,177,827 2,153,576 2,386,302 Capital Projects 3,832,019 6,757,325 1,476,787 7,930,000 1,699,000 Debt Payments 575,943 792,472 792,472 1,118,916 1,130,389 Transfers Out 261,054 270,725 276,800 286,300 858,600 Total Expenses 6,615,620 9,998,350 4,723,886 11,488,792 6,074,291 Ending Working Capital RESERVATIONS: Contingency Service Improvements Other 3,112,330 550,000 6,340,192 525,000 550,000 550,000 473,720 875,000 875,000 875,000 875,000 Available Working Capital 2,113,610 0 5,790,192 0 0 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 52 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 SIP & ( Fee! 6% Interest 2% Revenues 2000/01 Other Transfers 3% 70i 48% astewater iervices 35% Expenses 2000/01 Debt Transfers Payments 2% I no/ Operating Capital Projects 69% Fund Description: The Wastewater Fund is used to account for the revenues from all operating and maintenance activities of the utility and the expenses of the Utility Contracts, Wastewater Collection and Wastewater Treatment Facilities departments which support those activities. Wastewater expenses include operations, payment to a private contractor to operate the City's three treatment plants, debt payments, capital projects and transfers out to other funds as directed by the City Council. Capital Recovery Fees and Service Improvement Fees are dedicated to capital improvement projects. Significant Issues/Comments: => Capital projects are funded through operating revenues, capital recovery fees and debt when needed. In 2000/01, $925,000 of operating revenue and $825,450 of Special Improvement Fees transferred from the Water Fund are used for Capital Improvements. => The City will construct the Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant in 2000/01, which will increase the City's treatment capacity by 1.5 million gallons per day. The plant is scheduled to open in Spring 2003. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 53 Water Puna. 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 1,368,000 410,435 268,125 Beginning Working Capital 4,605,364 5,084,873 5,573,652 4,099,191 2,330,000 REVENUES: Water Services Bond Proceeds Capital Recovery Fees Special Improvement Fees Interest Grants All Other Revenue Transfers In Total Revenues EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities Capital Projects Debt Payments Transfers Out 6,386,530 6,375,000 6,790,400 6,715,000 7,298,000 1,500,000 1,400,000 1,400,000 2,315,730 1,368,000 410,435 268,125 415,000 268,125 268,125 631,548 945,780 747,180 798,045 798,045 273,132 197,130 286,810 203,048 203,375 18,594 147,450 467,726 407,100 654,253 433,190 484,877 18,164 2,759 2,759 9,706,129 9,595,894 10,296,402 8,564,858 9,052,422 2,689,523 3,686,453 3,455,180 4,294,252 4,210,327 3,733,660 4,861,273 4,588,012. 2,315,730 1,368,000 679,228 934,421 934,421 1,310,217 1,322,745 2,212,646 2,773,620 2,793,250 2,413,850 1,916,275 Total Expenses 9,315,057 12,255,767 11,770,863 10,334,049 8,817,347 Ending Working Capital 4,996,436 2,425,000 4,099,191 2,330,000 2,565,075 RESERVATIONS: Contingency 1,665,000 2,025,000 2,025,000 1,700,000 1,700,000 Other Conservation Rate 430,000 150,000 150,000 310,000 470,000 Service Improvements 547,498 250,000 320,000 395,075 Available Working Capital 2,353,938 0 1,924,191 0 0 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 54 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Revenues 2000/01 Expenses 2000/01 Interest Other SIP & CR 2% 4% I Fund Balance 19% Fund. Description: T --f- 2 Debt Payment; Nater 13% ervices 65% Capital Projects 22% Operating 42% The Water Fund is used to account for the revenues from all operating and maintenance activities of the utility and expenses of the Utility Contracts, Water Distribution and Water Treatment Facilities departments which support those activities. Water expenses include operations, payment to a private contractor to operate the City's four treatment plants, debt payments, capital projects and transfers out to other funds as directed by the City Council. Capital recovery fees, special improvement fees and revenues from summer conservation rates are dedicated to capital improvement projects. Significant Issues/Comments: - => The City will invest over $300,000 in a new integrated computer software system to improve customer to improve customer billing, financial reporting and human resource management. => Capital projects are funded through operating revenues, capital recovery fees and debt when needed. In 2000101, $950,000 of operating revenue is used for capital projects. - => Water Transfers Out include $325,450 of Del Webb Service Improvement Fees moved to the Wastewater Fund to pay for the Pecan Branch Wastewater Interceptor. => The City opened the Southside Microfiltration Plant in July 2000, increasing operational costs. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ---. ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 55 Airport Fund. 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 345,000 412,921 412,921 Beginning Working Capital 256,832 447,908 504,832 272,954 293,832 REVENUES: Fuel & Terminal Sales 548,352 555,000 875,000 973,180 933,180 Leases & Rents 175,761 429,000 345,000 412,921 412,921 Bond Proceeds 1,775,000 520,000 1,007,635 1,117,580 1,052,580 Interest 22,925 19,171 42,871 34,009 9,009 All Other Revenue 36,487 222,500 38,517 139,500 27,000 Transfers In 1,412 1.412 Total Expenses 2,310,525 Total Revenues 2,558,525 1,747,083 1,302,800 1,559,610 1,382,110 EXPENSES: Community Services 625,034 1,009,823 1,007,635 1,117,580 1,052,580 Capital Projects 1,608,389 852,653 354,607 246,000 10,000 Debt Payments 77,102 182,515 172,436 175,152 195,230 Total Expenses 2,310,525 2,044,991 1,534,678 1,538,732 1,257,810 Ending Working Capital 504,832 150,000 272,954 293,832 418,132 RESERVATIONS. Contingency Other 150,000 150,000 150,000 150,000 Capital Projects 122,954 143,832 268,132 Available Working Capital 504,832 0 0 0 0 Puna. Description: The Airport Fund is used to account for revenues and expenses related to the operation and maintenance of the Georgetown Municipal Airport. Significant Issues/Comments: => Revenues are derived from fuel sales to private aircraft, hangar leases, sales taxes generated from businesses located at the airport, and property taxes levied against privately held airport property. => Projects for a new terminal building and runway rehabilitation, which are assisted by grant funding, are scheduled for completion during 2000/01. => The Airport Fund will contribute $25,000 as matching funds for a Federal Aviation Administration noise study to determine the effect of increased traffic at the airport on the surrounding neighborhoods. FINANCIAL SUMMARY 56 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Sanitation Fund. 99/00 00/01 01102 98199 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 34,050 35,750 Beginning Working Capital 35,094 55,026 67,706 57,579 50,000 REVENUES: Sanitation Services 1,909,983 2,023,385 2,071,000 2,538,000 2,634,700 All Other Revenue 30,772 29,001 34,050 35,750 37,500 Transfers In 1,112 4,527 4,527 Total Revenues 1,941,867 2,056,913 2,109,577 2,573,750 2,672,200 EXPENSES: Community Services 1,795,451 1,938,599 1,993,404 2,438,879 2,523,850 Transfers Out 113,804 123,340 126,300 142,450 148,350 Total Expenses 1,909,255 2,061,939 2,119,704 2,581,329 2,672,200 Available Working Capital 67,706 50,000 57,579 50,000 50,000 RESERVATIONS. Contingency 501*000 50,000 50,000 50,000 Other Available Fund Balance 67,706 0 7,579 0 0 Fund. Description: ` The Sanitation Fund is used to account for revenues from all operating and maintenance activities of the utility and the expenses of the departments which support those activities. Sanitation includes operating costs for the Collection Station and Utility Contracts departments, as well as payments to the City's private ` contractor for solid waste disposal services. Significant Issues/Comments: => Increased cost of service by the contractor will result in a $0.90 rate increase effective in December 2000. => This fund became self-supporting in 1998/99. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 57 Stormwater Drainage Fund. 99/00 00101 01102 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Working Capital 1,665,819 1,138,640 1,150,439 644,850 65,000 REVENUES: Stormwater Fees 616,213 655,000 668,900 715,778 736,318 Bond Proceeds Interest 77,858 14,772 48,987 1,800 1,800 All Other Revenue 8,930 10,955 10,955 11,550 12,050 Transfers In 19,563 3,158 3,158 25,000 Total Revenues 722,564 683,885 732,000 729,128 775,168 EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities 360,967 437,315 423,239 475,106 475,606 Capital Projects 549,426 1,087,200 580,500 542,212 Debt Payments 170,367 193,050 193,050 193,110 254,662 Transfers Out 157,184 39,960 40,800 98,550 44,900 Total Expenses 1,237,944 1,757,525 1,237,589 1,308,978 775,168 Ending Working Capital 1,150,439 65,000 644,850 65,000 65,000 RESERVATIONS: Contingency 50,000 Other 65,000 65,000 65,000 65,000 Available Working Capital 1,100,439 0 579,850 0 0 Punct. Description: The Stormwater Drainage Fund is used to account for the operations and maintenance of the City's drainage system. Stormwater drainage expenses also include debt payments for capital improvements. Significant Issues/Comments: => Existing fees currently fund operations and existing debt service. => Additional capital and infrastructure improvements will require additional future rate increases. FINANCIAL SUMMARY 58 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/0I General Capital Projects Funds - summary 2000/01 Facilities, Streets General Parks & Capital Capital Projects Public Safety Projects Total Beginning Fund Balance 3,359,193 1,614,324 4,973,517 REVENUES: Bond Proceeds 490,000 640,000 1,130,000 Interest 80,000 105,051 185,051 Service Improvement Fees 300,625 300,625 Interfund Transfers 80,000 715,000 795,000 Total Revenues 650,000 1,760,676 2,410,676 EXPENDITURES: Capital Projects 4,009,193 3,375,000 7,384,193 Total Expenditures 4,009,193 3,375,000 7,384,193 Ending Fund Balance 0 0 0 Fund Description: Capital projects funds are used to account for the acquisition and construction of major capital facilities other than those financed by Special Revenue and Enterprise Funds (i.e., utilities and airport ). Facilities, Parks & Public Safety Capital Projects Fund Includes funds for the implementation of the City's facilities construction plan, park projects and public safety related projects. The River Corridors Hike 'N Bike Trail construction is reflected in a special revenue fund, as it is partially grant funded. Public Safety Construction Fund The completion of Fire Station No. 4 and the Public Safety Facility are included for 2000101. Streets Capital Projects Fund Includes revenues from transportation improvements fee received as part of the City's development agreement with Del Webb Corp. for Sun City Georgetown. Transfers are from available balances in the Streets Special Revenue Fund. Projects to be constructed are included in the City's five-year capital improvement program FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 59 Special Revenue Funds - Summary 2000/01 Beginning Ending Fund Fund Fund Division/Section Balance Revenues Expenditures Balance Cemetery Fund Parks & Recreation 7,300 43,900 51,200 0 Convention & Visitors Bureau Economic Development 70,178 337,378 350,556 57,000 Court Fee Fund Finance & Administration 0 20,000 20,000 0 Drug Prevention Grant Parks & Recreation 4,650 10,184 14,834 0 Economic Development Grant CIP 0 650,000 650,000 0 - (Rivery) Georgetown Village Public Improvement District Fund Parks & Recreation 0 29,500 29,500 0 Library Donations Community Services 33,544 21,100 54,644 0 Main Street Facade Fund Community Services 0 1,200 1,200 0 Mapping Fund Information Resources 9,867 3,500 13,367 0 Parks Restricted Parks & Recreation 116,862 64,388 181,250 0 Police Restricted Police Services 24,973 149,591 174,564 0 Recreation Programs Parks & Recreation 74,385 735,229 759,614 50,000 Streets Community Owned utilities 386,674 2,028,547 2,262,221 153,000 Total Special Revenue Funds 728,433 4,094,517 4,562,950 260,000 Fund Description: _> Special revenue funds (SRF's) are used to account for specific revenues that are legally restricted for expenditures for particular purposes. The City uses these funds to track revenues and expenditures for the following: _> Grants +' . _> Hotel/Motel taxes _> Main Street facade contributions _> Parkland dedication fees _> Recreation programs _> Streets _> Each fund is treated as a separate department of the activity or department it falls under. For example, the Library Donations SRF is considered a department under the purview of the Public Library Director, in the Community Services division _> Individual fund and program information is included following the administering department. FINANCIAL SUMMARY 60 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Internal Service Funds - summary 2000/01 1,122,959 4,708,029 7,870,042 Facilities Fleet Information Joint Internal 0 Maintenance Management Services Services Service Funds 7.00 Fund Fund Fund Fund Total Beginning Working Capital 2,140 37,880 6,626 310,336 356,982 REVENUES: Charges for Services 543,813 1,339,166 940,710 3,741,476 6,565,165 Interest & Other 8,000 53,055 40,623 30,217 131,895 Interfund Transfers 55,000 135,000 626,000 816,000 Total Revenues 606,813 1,392,221 1,116,333 4,397,693 7,513,060 EXPENSES: Community Owned Utilities 983,422 983,422 Finance & Administration 608,953 1,110,101 1,582,099 3,301,153 Information Resources 1,122,959 1,122,959 Management Services 2,142,508 2,142,508 Interfund Transfers 320,000 320,000 Total Expenses 608,953 1,430,101 1,122,959 4,708,029 7,870,042 Ending Working Capital 0 0 0 0 0 Employees - Full Time Equivalent 1.00 4.00 7.00 51.00 63.00 Fund Description: Facilities Maintenance Fund Provides janitorial services, light maintenance, equipment repair and replacement (copiers, HVAC, etc.), landscape maintenance, building repair and replacement (roofs, painting, carpet) on an established schedule. Charges for services to each department are made based on predetermined lease fees. Fleet Management Fund Provides vehicles, vehicle equipment and communications equipment to all using City departments, as well as maintenance of all vehicles. Charges for services are based on annualized replacement and maintenance costs of each vehicle. Information Services Fund Provides computer hardware, software, training, and staff support. Charges for services are based on hardware and software requirements for each department. Joint Services Fund Composed of departments providing administrative services to City funds and departments. COU Administration, Pump Maintenance, Systems Engineering and Utility Office provide support to the City's utility funds. Administrative departments, including Accounting, Employee and Organizational Services, Finance Administration, Legal Services, Purchasing and Properties and Safety Services provide support to all City funds and departments. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 61 ,ro 62 PED This page intentionally left blank. FINANCIAL SUMMARY ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 co m ffi u Tl�l 0 Util ities J Energy, Sevices Electric Page 7-t Pump Maintenance Page 78 Systems Engineering Page 80 Transportation Services Stora neater Drainage Page 82 Streets Page 84 Water Services Water Page 86 Wastewater Page 90 COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES The Community Owned Utilities Division consists of Administration, Energy Services (Electric), Pump Maintenance, Transportation Services (Streets and Stormwater Drainage), Systems Engineering, Water Services (Wastewater Collection, Water Distribution and Wastewater and Water Treatment). This division constructs, maintains, and operates the City's utility infrastructure. The Division is responsible to maintain positive working relationships with outside organizations including, the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission and the Texas Department of Transportation. The Division also coordinates contracts with the private sector. This Division also oversees and coordinates the "A Safe Place" children's program. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Administration 283,839 324,146 320,551 335,710 335,710 Electric 1,001,523 1,153,985 1,113,083 1,197,071 1,197,071 Electric Contracts 13,195,811 13,282,621 13,792,355 14,464,311 15,030,311 Pump Maintenance 366,478 396,413 396,413 411,593 411,593 Stormwater Drainage 360,967 437,315 423,239 475,106 475,606 Streets 985,936 1,127,045 1,093,495 1,547,221 1,411,221 Systems Engineering 169,808 208,243 190,162 236,119 236,119 Water Distribution 506,022 615,068 615,068 774,408 774,408 Water Treatment Facilities 830,418 864,584 903,257 1,281,520 1,334,620 Water Contracts 1,353,083 2,206,801 1,936,855 2,238,324 2,101,299 Wastewater Collection 398,563 494,385 494,384 658,949 708,949 Wastewater Treatment Facilities 760,526 718,496 718,496 660,942 839,568 Wastewater Contracts 787,515 964,947 964,947 833,685 837,785 TOTAL 21,000,489 22,794,049 22,962,305 25,114,959 25,694,260 COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 63 COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 7 Wastewater Collection 5 Administration 4 Systems Engine 12.75 Streets 8 Wa— ..,...,.I 3.5 Stormwater 64.5 Total Employees Drainage 17 Electric p Maintenance Personnel, Operations, & Capital Operations Total Budget $25,114,959 ersonnel COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES 64 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDs & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.01 Existing undeveloped sites in Georgetown are put to beneficial use. Means (98-03) Support and assist in the development of the Rivery Tract and the entertainment district. (All Departments, Development Services, Economic Development, Management Services, Parks and Recreation) Environmental & Resource Conservation Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development. Focus End 2.01 Sufficient, high quality water is available to meet the current and future needs of citizens and businesses in Georgetown. Priority is given to: 1) human consumption 2) businesses 3) recreation Means (98-03) Develop an irrigation/effluent utility ordinance and reuse policy to expand the use of effluent water sources to irrigate City parks, open spaces, and area golf courses, and to reduce removal of water from the Edward's Aquifer. (Administration, Pump Maintenance, Systems Engineering, Water Services, Finance & Administration, Management Services, Parks and Recreation) Means (99-05) Work with the Brazos River Authority (BRA), Chisholm Trail Special Utility District (CTSUD) and Jonah Special Utility District on regional water supply planning with the emphasis on meeting long-term water supply needs. (Administration, Water Services) Means (99-05) Continue cooperative partnership with CTSUD; including modifying service area boundaries, selling treated water, providing wastewater services, and extending leases for Lake Georgetown property. (Administration, Systems Engineering, Water Services) Means (99-05) Continue cooperative partnership with Jonah Special Utility District on the purchase of treated water, plant expansion, and wastewater service. (Administration, Water Services) Means (99-05) Continue to work with Inspection Services for implementation of the Backflow Prevention Program for the protection of the City's water supply. (Administration, Water Services, Development Services) Means (00-01) Develop a Backflow Prevention Cross Connection Program to protect the public water system from possible contaminants, in cooperation with Management Services and Development Services. (Administration, Water Services, Development Services, Management Services) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 65 Focus End 2.02 Wildlife is conserved. Means (99-01) Investigate the mitigation plan alternatives for the proposed listing of the Georgetown Salamander on the Endangered Species List. (Administration, Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Water Services, Development Services, Management Services) Growth and Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced Means (98-04) Assist in location and design of City facilities identified in the city wide ten year plan to ensure that those facilities contribute to the health of the central business district, promote efficient and safe City operations, improve access by citizens and exemplify urban design standards. (All Departments, Development Services, Economic Development, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (00-05) Support Development Services and Information Resources divisions in preparing and implementing a comprehensive strategy to address the Geographic Information System (GIS) needs of the City. (Administration, Energy Services, Systems Engineering, Community Services, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) Means (00-05) Through comprehensive efforts with Georgetown Independent School District (GISD), assist in utility and traffic flow issues related to the location of new school sites and provide other utility and conservation solutions as necessary. (Administration, Energy Services, Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Water Services, Development Services, Parks and Recreation) Public Information and Education Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (00-05) Promote and provide public education and information regarding utility issues and programs through: • The distribution of educational book covers, signs and posters to local schools during Public Power Week. (Energy Services, Management Services) • The promotion of a community -wide program for National "Water Week." (Pump Maintenance, Water Services, Information Resources, Management Services) • The coordination of utility information booths at the Red Poppy Festival, July 4th celebration, Christmas Stroll, and other local festivals. (All Departments, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) • The continued use of safety programs at Georgetown schools which provides information regarding high voltage lines. (Energy Services) • The promotion of the "A Safe Place" Program at Georgetown schools to educate students that assistance is available to them. (All Departments, Information Resources, Management Services, Parks and Recreation, Police Services) • The broadcast of the City's Water Conservation Video to establish public awareness and compliance with water conservation principles. (Administration, Water Services, Management Services) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES 66 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Public Safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Means (96-05) Expand the "A Safe Place" Program, and provide for the safety of youth by providing educational programs in area schools, and by expanding training to employees of other divisions, including Information Resources, Police Services and Development Services. (All Departments, Development Services, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) Transportation Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Means (97-01) Complete the following traffic improvements: (Systems Engineering, Transportation Services) • Improve the traffic island at the intersection of San Jose Street and Holly Street • Realign Country Club Road at Williams Drive • Rehabilitate Main Street, from 6th to 9th Streets, including all utilities • Extend Maple Street 750 feet south of Quail Valley Drive • Rehabilitate Hutto Road from State Highway 29 to Quail Valley Drive • Extend Rock Street, from Morrow Street, to allows access behind Sonic Drive -In • Install antique lighting on Austin Avenue bridges Means (97-02) Identify, jointly with Police Services, Fire Services, and Development Services, traffic flows and emergency vehicle access to reduce accidents and improve traffic movement. (Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Development Services, Fire Services, Police Services) Means (97-05) Work with Williamson County, Management Services, and Development Services on the alignment of the following roadways: (All Departments, Development Services, Management Services) • . Inner Loop Road, west of Interstate Highway 35 • D.B. Wood Road • Booty's Road • Remaining segments of Inner Loop Road, east of Interstate Highway 35 • County Road 115 Means (97-05) Work with Williamson County, Management Services, and Development Services on the - construction of the following bridges: (All Departments, Development Services, Management Services) • Below the dam at Lake Georgetown • Between State Highway 29 and Williams Drive (including bridge crossings to improve traffic flow west of IH -35) • Spring Valley Road bridge • Inner Loop bridge, between State Highway 29 and F.M. 971 COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 67 Means (98-03) Work with Development Services to arrange early coordination with the Texas Department of Transportation to: (Administration, Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Management Services) • Widen Austin Avenue, from 6th Street to Williams Drive, including the two bridges spanning the North and South San Gabriel Rivers • Widen Williams Drive, from Cedar Breaks Road to Del Webb Boulevard • Realign F.M. 1460 to F.M. 2243 at Austin Avenue • Widen 0.75 miles on Leander Road west of Georgetown Independent School District property • Widen Highway 971 east of Business 35 to FM 1105 • Install traffic signal at Austin Avenue and Morrow Street • Widen and reverse the direction of entrance/exit ramps on Interstate Highway 35 • Install traffic signal at Inner Loop Road and State Highway 29 • Install traffic signal at Inner Loop Road and FM 1460 Means (99-01) Revitalize sidewalks in various parts of the downtown area, and construct new sidewalk from the Square to Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. (Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Development Services, Economic Development) Means (99-02) Design and construct the Rivery Bridge. (Administration, Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Development Services) Means (99-02) Establish database information for a Right -of -Way Management System to more clearly identify maintenance activity. (Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (99-04) Cooperate and coordinate with the Williamson County Unified Road District to provide an organized transportation roadway system. (Administration, Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Development Services, Finance & Administration) Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (98-05) Work with Legal Services, the Building Standards Commission and Fire Services for the enforcement of nuisance codes and ordinances through Inspection Services for the removal of sub- standard structures. (Streets, Development Services, Fire Services, Management Services) Means (99-01) Assist Information Resources in the coordination, implementation, and automation of the code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (All Departments, All Divisions) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES 68 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Utilities/Energy Policy End 12.00 City owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Means (96-02) Work with the Utility Office to develop and implement a utility marketing strategy and new rate structure which fully utilizes the Automated Meter Reading System (AMR) and prepares the City for possible future electric deregulation. (Administration, Energy Services, Finance & Administration, Information Resources) Means (98-01) Assist Finance & Administration, Employee & Organizational Services, and Information Resources with implementation of an integrated financial, human resources and utility customer information system. (Administration, Energy Services, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (98-04) Assist in location, design and construction of a new Community Owned Utilities compound, as identified in the citywide ten year plan, to promote efficient and safe city operations, improve access by citizens, and exemplify urban design standards. (All Departments, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (99-01) Establish a partnership with a full service utility distribution provider. (All Departments, Management Services) Means (99-02) Complete map and inventory of the electric system to ensure a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) compliant system. (Energy Services, Systems Engineering) Focus End 12.01 Customers of the City's electric utility have a range of choices with respect to rates, service levels and power supply options. Means (96-01) Complete the installation of the Customer Choice & Control System. (Administration, Energy Services, Water Services, Finance & Administration) Means (99-04) Create a telecommunication infrastructure with local franchises and other governmental entities. (Administration, Energy Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Focus End 12.02 City water and wastewater customers in all certified areas receive services which exceed state and federal standards. Means (95-01) Construct the Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant facility. (Administration, Systems Engineering, Water Services, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (96-01) Extend the scope of the Water Resource Management Plan to reduce peak water demands, through public education and incentives, and to encourage the practice of good conservation methods. (Administration, Water Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (96-01) Work with other water suppliers to ensure a Regional Water Supply System with the City of Round Rock and the Jonah Special Utility District. (Administration, Water Services, Management Services) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 69 Means (96-05) Plan for and establish wastewater system facilities in the Serenada Subdivision. (Administration, Systems Engineering, Water Services, Management Services) Means (97-02) Expand the wastewater collection system to provide wastewater service opportunities to residents in the Booty's Road and Cedar Breaks/Williams Drive areas (including: Turtle Bend and Oakcrest Subdivisions). (Administration, Systems Engineering, Water Services, Development Services, Management Services) Means (98-05) Continue to be active participants to create long-range water supply strategies with the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), Brazos River Authority (BRA), Trans -Texas and Senate Bill 1. (Administration, Water Services, Management Services) Means (99-03) Work with Development Services to implement and enforce the Cross -Connection Control Regulations (backflow installation and inspection) for water quality through plumbing codes and ordinances. (Administration, Water Services, Development Services) Focus End 12.03 The City's stormwater drainage system efficiently and effectively protects the health and safety of Georgetown's residents and minimizes the negative effects of standing water and urban runoff. Means (96-01) Reduce stormwater runoff impact on the San Gabriel River by constructing detention and retention ponds and filter beds, installing and replacing curbs and gutters in the Old Town area, and construction of drainage facilities. (Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Water Services, Development Services) TXDOT Retaining Wall San Gabriel Parks dams and retaining walls 4th to 9th between Elm and Ash Streets Means (00-05) Maintain an on-going Regional Stormwater Plan consistent with State and Federal guidelines, in cooperation with Development Services. (Administration, Systems Engineering, Transportation Services, Development Services, Management Services) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES 70 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 /tib GEORGC4� O� COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 A.:. L This page intentionally left blank. 71 iP-� WHAT WE DO: The Community Owned Utilities Administration Department manages financial operations and personnel services for all departments in the division. The Department provides administrative support, including customer relations, reception, record keeping, and secretarial services, to all departments within the division. Long-term system planning is coordinated by this department. Administration is responsible for coordination and operation of Utilities during Emergency Management situations. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Assisted the Georgetown Independent School District (GISD) by recommending solutions to utility conservation and traffic needs for various school facilities. • Implemented regular meetings with Williamson County, Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), and General Telephone (GTE) to coordinate and plan transportation projects. • Began negotiations with AEP Communications (formerly C3 Communications) for operation and maintenance of the fixed wireless network. • Worked with the Utility Office to revise water and electric rates that will reflect the new marketing strategy and utilize the automatic meter reading system. • Coordinated construction of restroom facilities in San Gabriel Park next to the children's Playscape. • Coordinated remaining phases of team training; implementing an integrative culture, and began a series of work sessions to maintain focus on managing to the future and personal development. • Worked with the Utility Office and a private consulting firm to present a series of workshops/Town Hall meetings to the public providing information on the electric industry deregulation and restructuring. 72 • Coordinated availability of utilities, traffic management, the City booth and the "A Safe Place" booth for the Red Poppy Festival; in cooperation with Police Services, Community Services, and the Red Poppy Committee. • Planned and coordinated an open house for presentation to the public of design options for realignment of Country Club Road/Rivery intersection at Williams Drive. • Remodeled Community Owned Utilities building to enhance customer service and work environment. • Instituted new Capital Improvement Project Five - Year Plan in cooperation with all City divisions. • Commenced operation of the new Utility Operations Work Order Software System. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Continue division work sessions to maintain integrative culture, focusing on managing to the future with emphasis on professional development. • Support facility planning and construction process of a new Municipal Service Center. • Review and update internal operational policies and procedures to reflect community expectations and changing utility industry markets. • Work with GISD to recommend solutions to various utility conservation and traffic needs, for existing and developing school sites. • Implement a maintenance agreement for operation and maintenance of the fixed wireless network. • Continue regular meeting schedule with Williamson County, GTE and TxDOT to coordinate planning of area transportation projects. • Provide clarity to the long-range water planning process for Georgetown to meet consumer needs through 2050. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) Work orders completed 2) Customer contacts 3) Contracts negotiated ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY oo FY 99/00 FY 00/01 14,472 15,317 15,000 17,500 16,000 36,457 43,748 48,000 46,000 47,000 36 33 36 60 60 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 5/0 5/0 5/0 # Employees 5/0 5/0 214,597 231,501 230,628 Personnel 236,589 (2.6"/a) 236,589 (0.0%) 69,242 91,387 88,665 Operations 99,121 (1t.8%) 99,121 (0.0%) 1,258 1,258 Capital (-100.0%) (N/A) 283,839 324,146 320,551 335,710 (4.7%) 335,710 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 73 WHAT WE DO: • Worked with Police and Fire Services Divisions, and C3 Communications to update and expand the The Electric Department constructs and maintains a city-wide outdoor early warning system. complete system of electric conductors, switches, lines and transformers used for the distribution of electricity • Worked with Information Resources and AEP purchased wholesale from the Lower Colorado River Communications (formerly C3 Communications) Authority (LCRA). In addition, the Electric Department to expand the City's internal fiber optic network. reviews plans for construction of new lines (overhead • Completed the requirements, the defmition, and and underground), and develops design specifications the request for proposal phase of the new that meet all safety and construction requirements. The Customer Information System CIS for Finance r Electric Department installs and maintains streetlights. and Human Resources in conjunction with The department administers a tree trimming Finance and Administration, Employee and maintenance program to prevent damage to electric Organizational Services, and Information distribution equipment and lines. The department Resources. promotes public education and provides information through safety programs. In addition, the department monitors proposed legislation related to electric WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01 deregulation and evaluates its potential impact on the City of Georgetown and its customers. • Map and inventory remainder of the electric system in order to meet deregulation with a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) � WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: valued system. • Install residential underground electric services: • Mapped and inventoried one-fourth of the electric Sun City (425), Berry Creek Reserve (40), r system in order to meet deregulation with a Georgetown Village (45), Katy Crossing (50), and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Crystal Knoll (40), Georgian Place (40), Chisholm valued system. Park (45) and Summercrest (40); as well as an • Completed Phase Three of a four year Right of additional 150 new residences and apartments Way Maintenance (tree trimming) schedule to identified by Development Services. improve system reliability. • Rehabilitate and upgrade electrical facilities on Main Street (from 6th to 9th Streets), and alongn • Installed additional lighting iSan Gabriel Park, 6th 7th and 8th Streets (between Main and along the hike and bike trail, and in other neighborhood parks to assist Police Services in Church Streets), in conjunction with Water reducing crime. Services and Transportation Services capital improvement projects in this area. • Completed feeder voltage conversion on Gabriel • Install additional lighting in area parks to assist Substation feeders GB -30 and GB -60 to improve Police Services in reducing crime. system reliability and service. • Installed capacitors on feeders at Georgetown • Work with the Georgetown Independent School Substation, Chief Brady Substation, and Gabriel District (GISD) to recommend solutions to various Substation to aid in maintaining a power factor utility issues and conservation efforts at existing o. above 95/o and proposed school sites. • Completed installation of dual circuit (CB 30) out • Construct tie and feeder line extensions from of Chief Brady Substation, for increased load in County Road 151, south to State Highway 971, to dually certificated areas south of Leander Road. the new Katy Crossing Middle School. • Continue with phase four of the Right of Way Maintenance Schedule. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES 74 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Average street light repairs increased from 260 in FY 97/98 and 98/99 to approximately 1,180 in FY 99/00. Implementation of a program to proactively manage the Parks and Neighborhood Lighting project has resulted in fewer customer requests for street light repairs. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 75 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) Temporary Power Connections 500 624 800* 820* 875* 2) Permanent Power Connections 450 351 830* 830* 875* 3) Street Light Repairs 260 547 550 1,080 1,100 4) Underground Locates 450 954 2,500 2,800 3,500 * Includes contract labor work orders not previously included. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 16/0.25 17/0 17/0 # Employees 17/0 17/0 542,973 734,824 704,592 Personnel 769,940 (9.3%) 769,940 (0.00/-) 427,823 418,591 407,921 Operations 427,131 (4.7%) 427,131 (0.0%) 30,727 570 570 Capital (-100.0"/0) (N/A) 1,001,523 1,153,985 1,113,083 1,197,071 (7.50/6) 1,197,071 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Average street light repairs increased from 260 in FY 97/98 and 98/99 to approximately 1,180 in FY 99/00. Implementation of a program to proactively manage the Parks and Neighborhood Lighting project has resulted in fewer customer requests for street light repairs. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 75 ELECTRIC CONTRACTS The Electric Fund transfers to the General Fund and Streets Special Revenue Fund two percent of its gross billings for utility services. This transfer has been viewed as a payment of franchise fees which would have been payable to the General Fund from a non -City provider of such services. This department also accounts for the contractual obligations not specific to an individual department of the fund, such as purchased power costs paid to the City's wholesale provider. Special Projects and Services include programs such as public education, energy and contracts not attributable to the Electric Department. The City maintains 182 miles of overhead electric distribution lines, 81 miles of underground distribution lines, and has a 100 -megawatt capacity. ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) Electric Utility Customers 2) mWh sold 3) System Load Factor 4) Percent Compliance with 95% Power Factor Goal ACTUAL FY 97/98 11,718 242,372 49% 100% ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 99/00 12,414 13,450 13,740 286,756 294,478 49% 50% 100% 100% 297,782 48% 100% 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) 140,000 100,000 100,000 AMR System Maintenance 11,584,452 11,597,040 12,083,700 Purchased Power 379,278 409,296 398,250 Admin Allocations 565,107 703,940 658,605 Joint Svc Allocations 369,239 383,145 391,800 Franchise Fees 142,970 89,200 160,000 Special Projects & Svcs 14,765 Capital 13,195,811 13,282,621 13,792,355 * Percent change of 00/011'roposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 76 240,000 (140.0%) 12,542,100 (3.8%) 459,299 (15.3%) 733,812 (11.4%) 405,300 (3.4%) 83,800 (-47.6%) PROPOSED FY 00/01 14,060 329,943 50% 100% 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 240,000 (o.o%) 13,095,500 (4.4%) 459;299 (o.o%) 733,812 (6.o%) 422,900 (4.3%) 78,800 (-6.o%) 14,464,311 (4.9%) 15,0302311 (3.9%) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 GEOIIG��� K3 ED This page intentionally left blank. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 77 WHAT WE DO: The Pump Maintenance Department maintains booster and lift stations; city swimming pool pumps, motors, valves and chlorine control systems; public water supply wells; water and wastewater service equipment. The department also performs video camera work on wastewater lines in the system, and tests and rebuilds water meters. } The Department provides scheduled preventive i� maintenance of all system facilities, as well as Uexpanded facilities. The Maintenance shop is Uequipped with a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system (SCADA) to assist in Operations & Maintenance activities. The Department shares workload with the Water/Wastewater Department during peak times. Operators are on-call 24 hours a day to provide quality service. The Pump Maintenance Department participates with the Safety Manager to provide safety training workshops. The Department also offers tours of facilities and demonstrations to students, instructors, scout troops and other groups to promote safety and ,0 conservation awareness. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Replaced bypass valve at the Southside Booster Station. • Rebuilt high service pump No. 3 at Southside ro Booster Station. • Installed transfer switches at major lift stations. • Implemented Bioxide Odor Control Program in Serenada, Sun City, and Waters Edge Apartments. • Completed construction of the Leander Road Booster Station. • Completed water reuse filter project at the San Gabriel Wastewater Treatment Plant. • Finalized agreement with Nextel to locate cellular antennas on Central Water Tank. 78 • Rehabilitated two intake structures at the Lake Water Treatment Plant. • Rehabilitated pumps and motors at Well No. 8. • Commenced operation of the Midway Business Park Sewage Lift Station on South Interstate Highway 35. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Install increased pumping capacity at Rabbit Hill Booster Station. • Install and program a computer aided maintenance package. • Complete modifications at both water treatment plants, replacing turbidity meters and filter controllers and completing valve work. • Inspect and touch-up coatings on elevated and ground storage tanks throughout the system. • Develop an Industrial Pre -Treatment Program (IPP) to identify industrial wastes entering the wastewater system. • Install a spare irrigation pump and motor at Sun City Irrigation Station. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL BUDGETED ACTUAL ACTNTIY INDICATORS FY 97/98 1) Linear feet of wastewater 8,000 28,000 lines inspected by camera 20,000 20,000 23 23 2) Motor rebuilds & rewinds 25 25 25 25 3) Pump rehabilitations 50 10 128,083 N/A 4) H2S Excursions 157,908 (o.o%) ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 Adopted 28,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 23 15 20 15 25 25 25 25 N/A N/A 50 10 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 366,478 396,413 396,413 411,593 (3.8%) 411,593 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The decrease in linear feet of wastewater lines inspected by camera is due to a change in policy in 1998, which requires developers to be responsible for camera inspection of new wastewater lines. The City's odor control program continues to require continuous monitoring at certain locations in the City. As the wastewater system has grown, the need to monitor for hydrogen sulfide gas (112S) has increased throughout the system. Pump Department personnel have taken responsibility to monitor and adjust the flow of chemicals to mitigate the effects of H2S. The City will develop an Industrial Pre -Treatment Program (IPP). The program is intended to verify that City wastewater customers are in compliance with the current wastewater ordinance in terms of disposing of materials into the wastewater system. The program is also a link to meeting the goals of the City's new wastewater permits, recently issued by the TNRCC. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 79 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 7/0.25 7/0.25 7/0.25 # Employees 7/0.25 7/0.25 234,743 255,777 255,777 Personnel 253,685 (-0.8%) 253,685 (o.o%) 128,083 140,636 140,636 Operations 157,908 (12.3%) 157,908 (o.o%) 3,652 366,478 396,413 396,413 411,593 (3.8%) 411,593 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The decrease in linear feet of wastewater lines inspected by camera is due to a change in policy in 1998, which requires developers to be responsible for camera inspection of new wastewater lines. The City's odor control program continues to require continuous monitoring at certain locations in the City. As the wastewater system has grown, the need to monitor for hydrogen sulfide gas (112S) has increased throughout the system. Pump Department personnel have taken responsibility to monitor and adjust the flow of chemicals to mitigate the effects of H2S. The City will develop an Industrial Pre -Treatment Program (IPP). The program is intended to verify that City wastewater customers are in compliance with the current wastewater ordinance in terms of disposing of materials into the wastewater system. The program is also a link to meeting the goals of the City's new wastewater permits, recently issued by the TNRCC. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 79 WHAT WE DO: The Systems Engineering Department manages and maintains utility system models for departments within the Community Owned Utilities Division: including Water, Electric, Stormwater Drainage, Streets and Wastewater. The department provides engineering services related to grant applications. This department also coordinates and administers Capital Improvement Projects (C.I.P.'s) with outside engineering firms, handles easement and right-of-way negotiations and acquisitions and manages construction phases. Systems Engineering supports the review of approximately 150 development plans and reviews annually. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Developed a Regional Stormwater Drainage and Detention Policy and a City of Georgetown Stormwater Drainage Manual. • Implemented a utility work order system for Community Owned Utilities. • Managed development of a city-wide Transportation Model to better identify Capital Improvement Projects. • Coordinated construction of the parking lot at 6th and Main, Holly Street, 7th and 8th Streets at Maple, San Gabriel Overlook and Gabriel View Drainage, Main Street sidewalk and drainage, Power Road curb, gutter and overlay, and Annie Purl Drive. • Coordinated and managed the construction of water lines on Airport Road, C.R. 151, Leander Road West, Hart Street, and the Smith Branch Interceptor, Phase II. • Assisted with the application, coordination and completion of Economic Development grant projects for Rivery Boulevard and Hewlett infrastructure. 80 • Assisted with the Community Development Block Grant for Austin Avenue water line project. • Designed an antique -style telephone booth to conform with the downtown historical district in the parking lot at 6th and Main. • Prepared and maintained computer maps and exhibits for Police Services, Fire Services, Parks & Recreation, Development Services and Management Services. • Assisted the Parks & Recreation Department with the design of a Detailed Development Plan for Emerald Springs Park. • Assisted Transportation and Administration in the coordination of the Open House for presentation to the public of the realignment options for Country Club/Rivery at Williams Drive. • Assisted with the 911 Addressing Team to create and implement a new addressing policy for Georgetown and its extra territorial jurisdiction (ETJ). WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Implement a citywide digital transportation plan to better identify Capital Improvement needs. • Implement a citywide digital Right-of-way Management System (RMS) for improved, cost- effective maintenance and inventory of City infrastructure and assets. • Continue maintenance of infrastructure maps that are tied to true horizontal and vertical coordinates for future input into a city-wide Geographical Information System (GIS). • Support the development and implementation of work teams within the Community Owned Utilities Division. • Manage construction of the 2000/01 CEP projects. • Coordinate updates of the annual CIP process. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) Information requests processed 2) Easement/Right-of- Way Acquisitions 3) Management of Capital Improvement Projects a. Number of Projects b. Project Costs 4) Computer Mapping, modeling hours ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1,500 1,900 2,300 2,100 2,300 30 77 44 50 25 12 14 22 20 22 $4,350,000 $4,600,000 $6,895,000 $5,685,000 $5,900,000 244 .250 260 260 300 2000/01 ADOPTED AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 00/01 Adopted (% Change *) 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 4/0 99/00 203,910 (39.8%) 98/99 99/00 Projected 32,209 (o.o%) Actual Budget Actual 3/0 3.5/0 3.5/0 # Employees 146,573 162,483 145,862 Personnel 23,235 45,760 44,300 Operations 169,808 208,243 190,162 Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 00/01 Adopted (% Change *) 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 4/0 4/0 203,910 (39.8%) 203,910 (0.0%) 32,209 (-27.3%) 32,209 (o.o%) 236,119 (24.2%) 236,119 (0.0%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The Senior Utility Inspector position, added in 99/00 will provide better management of in-house capital improvement projects in 00/01. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 1999/00 81 WHAT WE DO: The Stormwater Drainage Utility addresses environmental concerns over in -stream water quality, regulatory demands related to stormwater run-off controls, infrastructure operation and maintenance, and drainage/flood control related capital project needs. Other duties include assisting Police and Fire Services on Code Enforcement issues. W WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Installed 1,500 linear feet of curb and gutter along sections of Walnut Street, north of Highway 29. p • Installed 8,000 linear feet of concrete ribbon curb on College Street from 2nd Street to the low water bridge in San Gabriel Park. • Performed drainage work to relieve excessive erosion on Norwood West. • Completed the curb and gutter project on Power Road in conjunction with a transportation overlay project. • Implemented the upgrading process of the storm drain system along Elm Street and Ash Street from 4th Street to 10th Street. • Assisted in the development of a Regional Stormwater Master Plan. • Completed the drainage project in Berry Creek Subdivision, Section One. • Finalized construction of the drainage correction o projects at San Gabriel Overlook, Gabriel View Drive and Country Club Drive • Completed installation of new safety gates at the low water crossing bridge in San Gabriel Park. • Installed a high water alarm at the Berry Creek low water crossing bridge. 82 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Install 1,700 linear feet of curb and gutter on portions of Walnut Street, north of Highway 29. • Begin implementation of the Regional Stormwater Detention System. • Implement a contract for the analysis of the San Gabriel Park Dam, San Gabriel Park retaining wall, and the Blue Hole Dam. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) Number of storm drains cleaned 9 3 6 24 26 2) Miles of Public Right -of -Way 348,278 (16.5%) 348,778 (0.1%) 360,967 437,315 423,239 475,106 (12.3%) 475,606 (0.1%) mowed and cleaned 20.5 20.5 20.5 21 21 3) Hours of street sweeper operation 1,200 1,500 1,400 1,400 1,600 4) Linear feet of curb and gutter installed/replaced City wide a. Old Town construction 16,800* 13,500* 14,000* 14,000* 1,000* b. Other replacement 1,700 5,000 0 200 0 c. Annual curb & gutter installation/construction 3,200 2,500 2,500 1,500 1,500 * Numbers from 1997 to 2000 indicate Capital Improvement Projects, in addition to annual curb and gutterprojects. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 3/0.5 3/0.5 3/0.5 # Employees 3/0.5 3/0.5 125,709 125,195 124,178 Personnel 126,828 (2.1%) 126,828 (0.0%) 235,258 312,120 299,061 Operations 348,278 (16.5%) 348,778 (0.1%) 360,967 437,315 423,239 475,106 (12.3%) 475,606 (0.1%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 83 WHAT WE DO: The Street Department manages, maintains and repairs City streets and rights-of-way. Responsibilities include traffic control, emergency response operations, special events, and assistance in code enforcement. Daily, the department inspects roadways for sign repair, pavement management, and sight obstructions. The Street Department participates with the Safety Manager to provide safety -training workshops. • Worked with Inspection Services to create and implement a one-stop calling point to identify and correct code violations. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Seal Coat 3 to 5 lane miles of rural design roadway on Airport Road, Lakeway Drive and Industrial Boulevard. • Asphalt microsurface approximately 23 lane miles WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: of urban roadway: • Churchill Farms Subdivision; • Seal coated 3 lane miles of roadway in River Hills • Berry Creek, Section Two; Subdivision. • Pleasant Valley Subdivision • Asphalt overlay approximately 10 lane miles of • Asphalt overlayed 10 lane miles: urban roadway on:. • Maple Street from 15th to Quail Valley; and, Areas bound by 16th Street to 19th Street and • Golden Oaks Drive; • 10th and 1 lth Streets from Business 35 to Hutto Road to Annie Purl School Scenic Drive; • Asphalt microsurfaced 23 lane miles: • Mesquite; • Cottonwood • Berry Creek, Section One; • West Old Town area, bound by 2nd Street to • Construction and Reconstruction Projects: 9th Street and Rock Street to Scenic Drive; . Main Street from 6th Street to 9th Street; • Portions of Reata Trails Subdivision; . Realign Country Club Road/Construct Rivery • Portions of San Gabriel Heights Subdivision Boulevard to Williams Drive; • Extend Maple Street 750 linear feet south • Asphalt overlayed and installed concrete ribbon from Quail Valley Drive; curb on College Street between 2nd Street and the . Rivery Bridge approach and Rivery Bridge low water bridge in San Gabriel Park. construction; • Hutto Road • Completed construction of Holly Street to College. • Design traffic islands for Williams Drive west IH • Rehabilitated 7th and 8th from Maple to cemetery. 35 frontage intersection. • Completed construction of the downtown parking • Place antique lighting on widened bridges on d lot at 6th Street and Main Street. Austin Avenue. • Planned and coordinated an open house for • Extend Rock Street to allow access behind the presentation to the public of design options for the Sonic Drive -In. realignment of the Country Club Road/Rivery intersection at Williams Drive. • Rehabilitate Morrow, from Business 35 to Stadium Drive, and Riverhaven, from F.M. 971 to • Participated on a volunteer basis to construct Stadium Drive. restrooms near the Safe Place display at the playscape. • Assist Systems Engineering, Development Services and HDR Engineering in developing a city-wide traffic study. 84 COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 _ ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Lane miles of sealcoat, overlay or microsurfacing 12 13 20 36 36 2) Square feet of roadway patching 35,000 30,000 30,000 85,000 50,000 3) Traffic signs repaired/ installed 140 200 200 200 200 4) Lane miles of streets maintained 325 335 335 345 345 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 11.25/0.75 12/0.75 12/0.75 # Employees 12/0.75 12/0.75 377,279 454,465 434,167 Personnel 465,594 (7.2%) 465,594 (0.0%) 597,751 672,580 659,328 Operations 831,627 (26.1%) 695,627 (-16.4%) 10,906 Capital 250,000 (N/A) 250,000 (0.0%) 985,936 1,127,045 1,093,495 1,547,221 (41.5%) 1,411,221 (-8.8%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Street repairs ($150,000) and unscheduled street maintenance ($100,000) previously budgeted in the Streets General Capital Projects fund, have been moved to the Streets Department as on-going capital maintenance projects. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 85 WHAT WE DO: The Water Distribution Department is responsible for routine inspection of water distribution lines; installation of new water taps and meters; rehabilitation and replacement of damaged or inefficient water lines, meters, fire hydrants and valves. The Department performs water utility locations and inspections for proper materials/methods. Staff advise customers of non - City water problems, when discovered. Staff are on- call to respond to emergency problems 24 hours a day. The Water Distribution Department takes routine water samples to test the safety and efficiency of the system. The Department will continue to maintain water System lines and equipment as well as continue to recognize, follow, and meet all Environmental Protection Agency and Safe Drinking Water Act regulations. The Water Department participates with the Safety Manager to provide safety training workshops, and with the Building Inspection Department to ensure water system protection. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Installed new water meter registers on all meters replaced in 1999/00 to allow remote readings. • Implemented Team Leader Management to allow employee problem solving and empowerment. • Constructed new restrooms at the Playscape, using donations and volunteer labor. • Purchased and installed hypochlorite system, for disinfection at wastewater plants, as required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). • Continued work with Inspection Services for implementation of the Backflow Prevention Program for the protection of the City's water supply. • Completed the following Water Capital Improvement Projects: Completed water interconnect between the City and Chisholm Trail Special Utility District ; 86 • Completed first phase of the water reuse line; • Developed a Long -Range Water Supply Plan; • Constructed a twelve -inch water line along Airport Road; • Completed customer satisfaction survey. • Installed an ultra -filtration system at the Southside Wells to increase water system capacity up to 2 million gallons per day (MGD). • Assisted Sun City Texas in developing a water conservation plan. • Implemented a leak detection program, as a part of the City's Water Conservation Program. • Published the first annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR), required by the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (TNRCC). • Constructed an 8 -inch irrigation line from San Gabriel Park to Rivery Park. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH rT 2000/01: • Complete the following Water Capital Improvement Projects: • Relocate 8 inch water line on Hutto Road in coordination with Texas Department of Public Safety road improvements; • Replace and upsize casing and replace pump and motor in Well #2; • Construct a portion of the West Loop 20 -Inch Water Line to improve water supply and provide transmission routes to other parts of the system; • Complete construction of the Sun City Pump Station and the Rabbit Hill Pump Station; • Replace water mains on Pine Street and on College Street (from East 15th to East 18th Streets); • Evaluate and rehabilitate Leander Road Elevated Storage Tank and Sequoia Spur Water Storage Tank. • Develop an irrigation/effluent utility ordinance and reuse policy to expand the use of effluent water sources to irrigate City parks, open spaces, and area golf courses, and to reduce removal of water from the Edward's Aquifer. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGETAND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Water leaks repaired 230 395 595 411 595 2) Water taps installed 450 450 438 450 450 3) Line locations completed 530 975 1,200 1,173 1,400 4) Fire hydrant meters installed 100 105 90 100 120 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGETAND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 7.5/0 8/0 8/0 # Employees 8/0 8/0 153,877 255,075 255,075 Personnel 299,222 (17.3%) 299,222 (0.0°0) 348,736 358,283 358,283 Operations 367,186 (2.5*/.) 367,186 (0.0%) 3,409 1,710 1,710 Capital 108,000 (6215.9%) 108,000 (0.0^io) 506,022 615,068 615,068 774,408 (25.9%) 774,408 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City of Georgetown Water Department and Building Inspection Services are currently working to develop a Backflow Prevention/Cross-Connection Program to be implemented in fiscal year 2000/2001. This program will provide protection from contamination of the City's water supply through building construction methods. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that public water systems implement a Cross -Connection Program. The Backflow Prevention/Cross-Connection Program is intended to protect the public water system from contamination hazards that may siphon back into the water system. The program will allow the City to provide the safest and highest quality water to its customers. The Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) has also become a requirement of the City's Water Department. The City of Georgetown published its first report on October 19, 1999. This report is a TNRCC requirement for all public drinking water supply agencies and is published by the City to provide information on the City's drinking water quality. The report is published in the City's Quarterly Newsletter to ensure widespread readership of the document Utility trench repairs ($8,000) and Water Capital Improvements ($100,000), previously budgeted in the Capital Improvements Fund, have been moved to the Water Distribution Department as ongoing capital maintenance projects. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 87 WATER TREATMENT FACILITIES The City of Georgetown operates three water treatment plants: the Lake Water Treatment Facility, rated at 7.5 million gallons per day (MGD); the San Gabriel Water Treatment Facility, rated at 5.45 MGD, and the Southside Water Treatment Plant, rated at 3.0 MGD. The City of Georgetown retains ownership of these plants and contracts for their operation with a private contractor. During 1998/99 the City entered into a partnership agreement with Chisholm Trail Special Utility District (CTSUD) that provides for joint long-term water supply planning. The agreement gives CTSUD 840 acre feet of water supply and 2.18 MGD of off-peak water treatment capacity in exchange for service area and compliance with city -level fire flow requirements as CTSUD expands its water system. ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) Water Utility Customers 2) Water Usage (MGD): Average Flow Peak Flow Total Flow (MG) 3) Water Treated for Chisholm Trail Special Utility District (MGD) ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 10,650 11,570 11,600 12,150 13,000 5.78 6.49 7.5 6.90 8.28 13.28 13.11 13.28 13.50 13.28 2,112 2,370 2,326 2,521 3,021 N/A N/A .203 .100 .200 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 830,418 864,584 903,257 Operations 830,418 864,584 903,257 * Percent change of 00/0lProposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 88 1,281,520 (41.9%) 1,334,620 (4.1%) 1,281,520 (41.9%) 1,334,620 (4.1%) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 WATER CONTRACTS The Water Utility transfers two percent of its gross billings to the General Fund and Street Special Revenue Fund. This transfer is a payment of franchise fees which would have been payable to the General Fund from a non -City provider of such services. This department is also used to account for the contractual obligations not specific to any individual department of the fund. Special Projects and Services include programs such as public education on water conservation, as well as contracts and professional services. This department also includes payments to the Brazos River Authority (BRA) for the City's surface water supply. The City has water rights to 6,720 acre feet in Lake Georgetown and 15,488 acre feet in Lake Stillhouse Hollow. These water rights are expected to meet the needs of Georgetown's current certificated water service area through full build out. The City has entered into water supply agreements with Chisholm Trail Special Utility District (CTSUD) for 1.5 million gallons per day, and with Jonah Special Utility District for 1.0 million gallons per day. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 1,353,083 2,206,801 1,936,855 * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 2,238,324 (15.6%) 2,101,299 (-6.1%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Council contingency funds are now appropriated in the City Council's departmental budget within the General Fund. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 89 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 154,719 157,889 158,785 Admin Allocations 179,146 (12.8%) 179,146 (0.0%) 150,000 170,000 AMR Maintenance 240,000 (41.2'�c) 240,000 (0.0%) 353,954 365,000 365,000 BRA - Water Purchases 452,600 (24.0%) 631,869 (39.6%) 135,604 150,000 150,000 Council Contingency 0 (-100.0%) 0 (N/A) 146,549 152,525 159,100 Franchise Fee 157,000 (-1.3'�u) 160,600 (2.3%) 538,220 601,162 577,439 Joint Svc Allocations 789,684 (36.8%) 789,684 (0.0%) 24,037 630,225 356,531 Special Projects & Svcs 419,894 (17.8%) 100,000 (-76.2%) 1,353,083 2,206,801 1,936,855 * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 2,238,324 (15.6%) 2,101,299 (-6.1%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Council contingency funds are now appropriated in the City Council's departmental budget within the General Fund. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 89 0 0 WHAT WE DO: The Wastewater Collection Department maintains and rehabilitates the wastewater collection system, through routine inspections of system facilities and restoration of broken or collapsed mains. The Department provides maintenance services including: the installation of wastewater taps, the clearing, jet cleaning and camera inspection of lines, troubleshooting customer problems, and locating City wastewater lines. In addition, the Department performs preventive maintenance functions of the expanded collection system. This department coordinates with Building Inspection to ensure a safe and functioning wastewater system WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Purchased and installed a hypochlorite system for disinfection at wastewater plants as required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). • Completed the Serenada Wastewater Collection Master Plan and began Phase 1 construction of the wastewater collection system in the Serenada area. • Completed utility improvements on the parking lot at 6th and Main Streets and in the alley -way adjacent to the parking lot. • Constructed new restrooms at the Playscape, in San Gabriel Park, using donations and volunteer labor. • Surveyed customers who have had wastewater related problems to better address customer service issues. • Designed and bid the Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant construction project. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Wastewater Capital Improvements to be completed in 2000/01: 90 • Begin construction of the Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant, to treat 3 million gallons per day (MGD) of sewage. Operation of this plant is scheduled to commence summer of 2002. • Install wastewater line to Pecan Branch to relieve overuse of Williams Drive Lift Station. • Design and extend gravity wastewater lines to Sinuso Drive, Serenada Drive and Toledo Trail. • Install an effluent return line from the San Gabriel Wastewater Treatment Plant to the Park Storage Tank to reuse water for irrigation. • Implement the 2000/01 Wastewater Main Replacement Program in the Woodland Road and Gabriel View areas. • Continue the Edwards Aquifer Inflow and Infiltration Program to eliminate the flow of water into the City's wastewater system. • Develop a comprehensive Wastewater Preventive Maintenance Program to prevent sanitary sewer overflows (SSO) in the wastewater collection system. • Develop a Wastewater Pre -Treatment Program to verify compliance with the City's wastewater discharge permits. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/0 1 1) Sewer blockages cleared 165 165 324 180 324 2) Manholes repaired 6 6 5 6 6 3) Line locations completed 50 1,200 2,100 1,673 2,001 4) Wastewater taps installed 300 300 438 320 440 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 6/1 6/1 6/1 # Employees 6/1 6/1 179,429 194,650 194,649 Personnel 218,105 (12.1%) 218,105 (0.0%) 190,187 295,761 295,761 Operations 282,844 (-4.4%) 282,844 (0.0%) 28,947 3,974 3,974 Capital 158,000 (3875.8%) 208,000 (31.6^/0) 398,563 494,385 494,384 658,949 (33.3%) 708,949 (7.6%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Recently, new requirements from the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (TNRCC) have mandated that publicly owned wastewater treatment agencies notify their customers of significant wastewater overflows that may affect the health and safety of the community and its drinking water sources. This notification process will be significant in protecting the public health within the community. Utility trench repairs ($8,000), Wastewater Capital Projects ($100,000) and Edwards Aquifer Inflow and Infiltration ($50,000), which were previously budgeted in the Wastewater Capital Projects Fund, have been moved to the Wastewater Collection Department as on-going maintenance projects. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 91 WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES The City of Georgetown operates three wastewater treatment plants: the Dove Springs Wastewater Treatment Facility, rated at 1.25 million gallons per day (MGD); the San Gabriel Wastewater Treatment Facility, rated at of 2.5 MGD; and the Berry Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility, rated at 100,000 gallons per day. These award winning plants treat domestic and industrial effluent according to statutory regulations, and provide environmentally safe disposal of wastewater materials. The City of Georgetown contracts with a private contractor to provide for the safe operation of the wastewater plants. The private contractor conducts routine wastewater bio -monitoring, nitrogen removal and dechlorination. The City continues to closely monitor and evaluate these operations and retains ownership of the plants. The Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant will be constructed in 2001/02 to provide additional system capacity of 3 million gallons per day and to serve Sun City. The plant is scheduled to come on-line in the summer of 2002. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 760,526 718,496 718,496 Operations 660,942 (-8.o%) 839,568 (27.0%) 760,526 718,496 718,496 * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 92 660,942 (-8.0%) 839,568 (27.0%) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) Wastewater Utility Customers 8,700 8,700 9,300 9,800 10,300 2) Average Daily Flow (MGD) 2.918 2.6 2.603 2.616 2.836 3) Peak Daily Flow (MGD) 5.0 5.0 9.7 9.7 9.7 4) Million gallons treated 1,065 949 950 955 1,035 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 760,526 718,496 718,496 Operations 660,942 (-8.o%) 839,568 (27.0%) 760,526 718,496 718,496 * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 92 660,942 (-8.0%) 839,568 (27.0%) COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 WASTEWATER CONTRACTS The Wastewater Utility transfers two percent of its gross billings to the General Fund and Street Special Revenue Fund. This transfer is a payment of franchise fees which would have been payable to the General Fund from a non - City provider of such services. This department is also used to account for the contractual obligations not specific to an individual department of the fund. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change *) (% Change **) 95,400 (3.4%) 99/00 (4.3%) 98/99 99/00 Projected (0.0%) Actual Budget Actual (0.01) 87,018 90,240 92,300 Franchise Fees 93,484 103,838 96,991 General Fund Allocations 520,853 675,869 673,036 Joint Svc Allocations 86,160 95,000 102,620 Spec. Svc / Legal 787,515 964,947 964,947 * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change *) (% Change **) 95,400 (3.4%) 99,500 (4.3%) 118,873 (22.6%) 118,873 (0.0%) 574,412 (-14.7r) 574,412 (0.01) 45,000 (-56.11,) 45,000 (0.0%) 833,685 (-13.6%) 837,785 (0.51) 93 This page intentionally left blank. COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES 94 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Community% ,services�5 Airport Page 106 Animal Services Page 108 General Government Contracts Page 104 Public Library Page 110 Sanitation Page 114 COMMUNITY SERVICES - The Community Services Division consists of departments andprograms which provide basic municipal services for residents and businesses. City departments included in the Division are: the Airport, Animal Services, Collection Station, and Public Library. The Division also manages and coordinates the sanitation contract (solid waste services, recycling and bulky waste pick-up); the Teen Court Program; housing assistance contracts; provides support for affordable housing planning; and administers contracts for health and social services. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Administration 145,522 181,877 177,828 201,835 196,835 General Government Contracts 164,867 235,664 235,664 252,113 191,113 Airport 625,034 1,009,823 1,007,635 1,117,580 1,052,580 Animal Services 213,514 247,350 247,349 290,903 290,903 Collection Station 136,302 135,539 135,538 132,894 132,894 Sanitation Contracts 1,659,149 1,803,060 1,857,866 2,305,985 2,390,956 Library 745,014 795,217 794,103 830,361 830,361 Library Donations 36,595 40,000 40,000 54,644 21,100 Subtotal - Operations 3,725,997 4,448,530 4,495,983 5,186,315 5,106,742 Other Airport Capital Projects 1,608,389 852,653 354,607 246,000 10,000 Interfund Nondept'1 Charge 1,033,714 1,101,207 1,101,207 1,124,389 1,124,389 Division Total 6,368,100 6,402,390 5,951,797 6,556,704 6,241,131 COMMUNITY SERVICES -- ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 95 COMMUNITY SERVICES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 16 Library 2.5 Administration 33.25 Total Employees n Station 6.25 Airport vices Personnel, Operations, & Capital Capital operations Total Budget $6,556,704 COMMUNITY SERVICES 96 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDS & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. Means (99-04) Sponsor the Red Poppy Festival to help promote the unique character of Georgetown, especially its downtown historical district. (All Divisions) Environmental and Resources Conservation Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development Focus End 2.02 Wildlife is conserved. Means (99-01) Develop an educational program regarding wildlife habitat and coexistence issues. (Animal Services) Growth and Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. Means (98-04) Assist in location and design of City facilities identified in the citywide 10 -year plan to ensure that those facilities contribute to the health of the central business district, promote efficient and safe City operations, improve access by citizens and exemplify urban design standards. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Economic Development, Finance and Administration) Means (00-05) Support other Divisions in developing a strategy to address the Geographic Information System (GIS) needs of the City. (Administration, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance and Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 97 Health and Human Services Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human: services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-01) Coordinate with Williamson County and Cities Health District and the Georgetown Project on the development of a community needs assessment. (Administration) Means (99-04) Promote all Georgetown children through public fire education, Risk Watch Safety programs, and attend neighborhood block parties that strengthen youth and families, community partnerships, and neighborhood activities. (Administration -General Government Contracts, Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services, Parks and Recreation and Police Services) Means (00-01) Conduct a City-wide analysis of in-kind and cash contributions for social services. (All Departments, All Divisions) Means (01-02) Develop contracts for social services as determined by City Council. (Administration - General Government Contracts) Housing Policy End 6 00 All citizens have access to safe and adequate housing opportunities. Means (99-01) Develop implementation strategies for housing policies, in conjunction with Development Services. (Administration, Development Services, Management Services) Public Information and Education Policy End 7.0 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (99-01) Participate in the City's public information and awareness team. (All Divisions) Means (00-05) Coordinate with Parks and Recreation to develop recreation related programs foryouth at the Library. (Public Library, Parks & Recreation) Means (00-05) Develop Animal Safety and Humane Education Programs to use in Georgetown Elementary Schools and elsewhere. (Animal Services) Means (00-05) Recruit volunteers through Georgetown Information and Volunteer Program (GIVE) for city and community projects and services. (Administration, Public Library, Management Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) COMMUNITY SERVICES 98 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (00-05) Provide regular children's library programs that emphasize creative activities, reading for pleasure, positive values, and cultural competence. (Public Library) Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens Means (00-01) Increase the number of Town Hall meetings to provide for structured and public citizen input and feedback regarding municipal operations and issues. (All Divisions) Means (00-05) Provide services to special needs populations and to residents unable to visit the Public Library building. (Public Library) Public Safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Means (98-04) Conduct a needs assessment of hazardous materials using Chemical Manufacturing Association data in order to provide hazardous analysis planning and emergency response information for public safety employees. (Sanitation, Community Owned Utilities, Finance and Administration, Fire Services, Management Services) Focus End 8.03 Citizens are safe from animal threat. Means (99-01) Promote compliance with rabies vaccination requirements by developing and implementing a pet licensing campaign. (Animal Services) Focus End 8.03.01 The City provides humane animal accommodations. Means (98-03) Assist in location, design and construction of a new Animal Shelter, identified in the city- wide ten-year plan, to ensure that the facility promotes efficient and safe city operations, improves access by citizens and exemplifies urban design standards. (Animal Services, Finance and Administration, Management Services) Recreational and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open: space and recreation facilities and services contribute to an enhanced quality of life for citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. Means (97-02) Provide exhibit space for art by members of the Williamson County Art Guild. (Public Library) Means (99-01) Expand the volunteer Dog Walking Program in which citizens can "borrow" a dog from the Animal Shelter to walk or run on the various trails. (Animal Services) COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 99 Means (00-05) Work with the Parks and Recreation Division to coordinate and promote programs for children. (Public Library, Parks & Recreation) Transportation Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Focus End 10.01 The Georgetown Municipal Airport primarily serves the general aviation needs of the community. Means (99-04) Continue to pursue means to obtain an air traffic control tower to improve airport safety and efficiency. (Airport) Means (00-01) Complete construction of new/remodeled Airport Terminal Building. (Airport, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (00-01) Continue to pursue means for obtaining a jet engine "hush house" from the City of Austin to reduce noise from jet engine maintenance run -ups. (Airport) Means (00-01) Complete Federal Aviation Administration Part 150 Noise Study. (Airport) Utilities/Energy Policy End 1200 City owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Means (99-02) Promote and provide public education and information to encourage recycling and the reduction of solid waste. (Administration) Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (98-03) Work with Management Services, Development Services and Community Owned Utilities for the enforcement to nuisance codes and ordinances and for the removal of sub -standard structures. (Sanitation, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Management Services) Means (99-01) Assist Information Resources in the coordination, implementation, and automation of the code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (All Departments, All Divisions) COMMUNITY SERVICES 100 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (99-01) Revise the code enforcement process to implement a one-stop calling point and provide more aggressive identification and abatement of violations. (All Departments, All Divisions) Facilities and Services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Means (99-02) Develop and implement individualized career development and citywide succession plans. (All Divisions) Finance Policy End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future need are provided Means (00-01) Conduct a citywide competitive fee analysis. (All Divisions) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 101 i� WHAT WE DO: The Community Services Administration department supervises and provides administrative support for all departments of the division including the Municipal Airport, Animal Services, Collection Station and Public Library. Community Services Administration also: • manages sanitation and recycling contracts; • develops and manages housing grant applications; • monitors City contracts and leases with health, welfare, and community service agencies; • coordinates the Teen Court Program; • coordinates with Georgetown Project on children and youth issues. • serves as a resource for the new Economic Development Division. Community Services Administration supports and coordinates a variety of community project activities, and serves as the City's liaison to social services organizations and providers. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • • • 102 Planned and implemented community and neighborhood clean-up events in the fall and spring. Served on the Williamson County and Cities Hazardous Household Waste Coalition, to plan and promote the annual collection day event held April 29, 2000, with over 800 households participating. Coordinated work of a Council -appointed citizen's committee in the development of a housing policy plan and implementation strategy, to address issues including affordability, manufactured homes, sale of City property for housing, and infill development. • Implemented improvements for Teen Court Program, including the selection of teen attorneys through interviews, establishment of a partnership with Georgetown Information and Volunteer Exchange for service placements, and improved recognition programs for participants. • Conducted a review of the Collection Station services and fees, and implemented changes to address code enforcement problems throughout the City. • Conducted a review of performance standards and pay for contracted sanitation services, to develop and implement performance based pay incentives to ensure quality services. • Developed and implemented a funding application system for contracted Social Services. • Developed a strategy to implement recommendations of the Council -appointed Economic Development Task Force, creating a new Division for Economic Development. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Transition the Convention and Visitors Bureau and Main Street Program to a new Economic Development Division. • Implement strategies for development of affordable housing, based upon citizens committee plans. • Assess Sanitation service fees and investigate possibility of establishing a transfer station for trash collection. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTNiTY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) Teen Court cases 80 60 100 75 80 2) Garbage and/or recycling 70,879 (43.4%) 65,879 (-7.1%) 145,522 181,877 177,828 201,835 (13.5%) 196,835 (-2.5%) calls for information* 2,600 1,000 500 300 300 3) Contracts monitored 10 10 10 10 10 * See `Significant Changes"below. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 2/0 2.5/0 2/0.5 # Employees 2/0.5 2/0.5 104,771 128,802 128,389 Personnel 130,956 (2.0%) 130,956 (o.o%) 40,751 53,075 49,439 Operations 70,879 (43.4%) 65,879 (-7.1%) 145,522 181,877 177,828 201,835 (13.5%) 196,835 (-2.5%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/011'roposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed ,SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The change in solid waste contractors, effective October 1, 1998, has made a difference in the number of calls City Community Services Administration receives from customers. Once the transition was complete for this change, calls and complaints decreased and have continued to do so. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 103 WHAT WE DO: This department accounts for the City's social and community service commitments, which are not specific to an individual department or fund, and is staffed by Community Services Administration. Maintenance of four community buildings, direct cash contributions, and utility subsidies for local social service organizations, supported by the City, are budgeted in this department. Administrative allocations for services received from other City funds are also budgeted in this department. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Developed contracts and provided funding for services delivered through non-profit agencies: • $70,000 for the Georgetown Project • $35,000 for the Williamson County & Cities Health District • $12,000 for the Stonehaven Senior Center • $10,000 for the Williamson -Burnet County Opportunities (WBCO) Crisis Center • $10,000 for the Georgetown Information & Volunteer Exchange • $7,500 for CARTS Transportation • $5,000 for WBCO Nutrition Program • $2,500 for the Literacy Council of Williamson County • $1,000 for the Hispanic Parents in Action • Funded facility maintenance, utilities and/or landscaping services for WBCO Head Start and A Madella Hilliard Community Center. • Developed a social services funding application process. 104 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Develop contracts for services to be provided by non-profit agencies. • Conduct an analysis of City contributions (staff, in- kind, services, and funding) provided to support community social services. • Prepare agreements for lease of City buildings and property maintenance arrangements. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 105 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 8,673 8,664 8,664 Facilities Maintenance 5,363 (-38.1%) 5,363 (0.0%) 80,500 84,000 84,000 Lease & Contracts 103,750 (23.5%) 42,750 (-58.8%) 62,787 130,000 130,000 Special Svc & Legal 130,000 (0.0%) 130,000 (0.0%) 12,907 13,000 13,000 Utilities 13,000 (0.0%) 13,000 (o.o%) 164,867 235,664 235,664 Subtotal - Department 252,113 (7.0%) 191,113 (-24.2%) 1,033,714 1,101,207 1,101,207 IntfdNondept'1Chrg 1,124,389 (2.1%) 1,124,389 (0.0%) 1,198,581 1,336,871 1,336,871 Subtotal - Department 1,376,502 (3.0%) 1,315,502 (-4.4^io) * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 105 WHAT WE DO: The Airport Department is responsible for the day-to- day operations and maintenance of the Georgetown Municipal Airport. These activities include the supervision of fuel sales concessions, monitoring the leases for City -owned facilities, and the supervision of the grounds maintenance. All of the above must be in compliance with state and federal rules and regulations. In addition, the Department provides support to the Airport Advisory Board. An Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) and a Remote Transmitter/Receiver Outlet (RTR-O) are located on the field to provide continuous weather information and clearance delivery services to the pilots. The UNICOM ground -to -air and air -to -ground radio is operated from 7:00 a.m. until dark, seven days week, at a frequency of 123.0. The runways are open to air traffic 24 hours a day, seven days a week at an elevation of 789 feet. The main runway, 18-36, is 5,000 feet long x 100 feet wide, lighted from dusk to dawn. The crosswind runway, 11- 29, is 4,100 feet long x 75 feet wide. The lights are radio controlled at the UNICOM frequency of 123.0, and five clicks of the microphone. The Airport owns and leases two large group hangars to Ican Aviation and Currey Aviation, leases 30 tiedown spaces and 113 T -Hangar spaces, and leases one small building to the Civil Air Patrol. Twelve tiedown spaces are reserved for the temporary, overnight visitors to the Airport. The Airport operates as an Enterprise Fund and is totally self-supporting. All expenditures are paid for with Airport revenues, and no general fund (city tax dollars) monies are spent on the Airport. The Department also purchases and sells aviation fuel (aviation gasoline and jet fuel), operates the UNICOM radio, relaying accurate, up-to-date weather information to pilots, and monitors and records the weather broadcasts from the Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS). Six part-time fuel attendants, one part-time bookkeeper, and one full-time 106 grounds maintenance worker operate this department under the direction of the Airport Manager. WHAT WE ACCOtiIPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Provided support for the 14th Annual Airshow. • Completed utility lines for upgraded services to the terminal building. • Started construction on a new/remodeled terminal building. • Completed construction of 62 new T -Hangar spaces. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Complete construction of the new/remodeled terminal Building. • Rehab the roof on T -Hangar C. • Repair north access Ramp to Hangar D. • Begin Federal Aviation Administration Part 150 Noise Study Program. • Continue to pursue inclusion in the FAA airtraffic contract control tower. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Gallons of jet fuel sold 149,382 140,000 155,000 277,100 300,000 2) Gallons of AvGas sold 151,870 160,000 165,000 257,846 275,000 3) Number of based aircraft 133 150 185 268 300 4) T -Hangar occupancy rate 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 2/3.25 2/4.25 2/4.25 # Employees 2/4.25 2/4.25 151,134 157,584 155,396 Personnel 163,231 (5.0%) 163,231 (0.0%) 473,900 852,239 852,239 Operations 954,349 (12.0%) 889,349 (-6.8%) 1,608,389 852,653 354,607 Capital 246,000 (-30.6%) 10,000 (-95.9%) 2,233,423 1,862,476 1,362,242 1,363,580 (0.1%) 1,062,580 (-22.1%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Additional hours for part time fuel attendants were added in 1999/00 to handle the increase in fuel sales. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 107 WHAT WE DO: Animal Services is committed to providing excellent customer service, protecting the health and safety of all people in Georgetown from animal nuisances and hazards, and providing healthy and humane care and treatment for animals. The Department provides counseling and information on responsible pet ownership, and nuisance and pest control. Animal Services enforces City Codes relating to animals --most commonly the "leash law" for dogs. The Department assists law enforcement agencies in enforcing State laws relating to animals (Cruelty to Animals, etc.) Animal Services provides shelter for stray and homeless pets, reunites lost pets with their owners and finds homes for homeless cats and dogs through a comprehensive Adoption Program. The Pet License Program provides identification of lost pets 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and gives owners of licensed pets a "Free Ride" (no impoundment fees) for impounded pets. Licensing is done through the mail, at local Veterinary Clinics, and at the Animal Shelter. A primary responsibility is protecting people in Georgetown from the threat of rabies. This is accomplished through enforcement of vaccination requirements for dogs and cats, quarantining and testing of animals that bite people, and educating people to respect wildlife and avoid handling wild animals. Officers patrol the City seven days a week, responding to a variety of calls for service and are on call 24 hours a day for emergencies involving animals. Animal Services sponsors quarterly low cost Rabies Vaccination Clinics, and provides information and assistance for pet neutering in order to help alleviate the pet overpopulation problems in Georgetown. The Department utilizes volunteers and staff in doing "off- site" adoptions at various places around Georgetown and in nearby cities, thereby reducing the numbers of pets destroyed. The Department provides residents with cages and traps to control animal nuisances. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Decreased the number of animals killed in the Animal Shelter by approximately 30%, even 108 though that number had remained almost constant for the last four years. • Increased the number of pets adopted from the Animal Shelter by approximately 20%, mainly through off-site adoption outreach programs staffed mainly by volunteers. • Decreased the number of animals impounded into the Animal Shelter by approximately 10% through encouraging spay/neuter programs to alleviate pet overpopulation and through proactive counseling and educating pet owners in responsible pet care. • Enhanced Animal Services customer service by moving into a new office trailer providing an indoor lobby for customers and office space for staff. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Implement an Animal Safety and Humane Education program to be taught in Georgetown Elementary Schools and elsewhere. • Expand the Animal Shelter's adoption program by increasing our volunteer base. • Become less dependent on transfer programs and take a leading role in pet adoptions in Williamson County. • Develop strategies to work toward no adoptable pets being killed in Georgetown Animal Shelters. • Expand Animal Services capabilities in investigating animal abuse and neglect and taking action in such cases by having an Animal Services Officer become a Certified Animal Cruelty Investigator. • Increase data management efficiency and capabilities by adding another computer to the Animal Services office, allowing staff to look up animal licenses, rabies vacanations and other information more quickly. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTrviTY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 Actual Budget Actual 1) Service calls 3,010 2,888 3,500 3,100 3,400 2) Animals impounded 1,691 1,706 2,100 1,566 1,900 3) Incoming phone calls 7,108 7,518 7,500 7,900 8,000 4) Animals euthanized 478 441 450 316 320 5) Animals Adopted 327 449 560 544 600 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Animal Services staff moved into more adequate temporary office space awaiting construction of a new animal shelter facility. An office trailer was leased and set up at the existing Animal Shelter site, and as a result this move also allowed for an expansion of the space for cats into the old, small office. This expansion now provides a separate space for observation of incoming cats, and cats with illnesses can be housed apart from healthy animals. A part time shelter attendant will be upgraded to full time to provide expanded services at the Animal Shelter. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 109 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 5.25/.5 6/0 6/0 # Employees 6.5/0 6.5/0 172,974 195,038 195,037 Personnel 215,633 (10.6%) 215,633 (0.0%) 39,095 52,312 52,312 Operations 75,270 (43.9%) 75,270 (0.0%) 1,445 0 0 Capital 0 (N/A) 0 (N/A) 213,514 247,350 247,349 290,903 (17.6%) 290,903 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time F FE's * Percent change of 00/0 1 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Animal Services staff moved into more adequate temporary office space awaiting construction of a new animal shelter facility. An office trailer was leased and set up at the existing Animal Shelter site, and as a result this move also allowed for an expansion of the space for cats into the old, small office. This expansion now provides a separate space for observation of incoming cats, and cats with illnesses can be housed apart from healthy animals. A part time shelter attendant will be upgraded to full time to provide expanded services at the Animal Shelter. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 109 WHAT WE DO: The Georgetown Public Library houses and administers a collection of more than 70,000 items including popular fiction and non-fiction, classics, large -print, reference, books -on -cassette, videos, literacy, Spanish-language, newspapers, magazines, CD-ROM programs, and youth and children's materials, to meet the life-long learning and reading interests of Library users. Weekly story hours, a summer reading program, reference services, and public access to the Internet are among many library services provided by staff without cost to the public. Under a reciprocal borrowing agreement, library users who hold current library cards can check out materials from the Round Rock Library, or use the inter -library loan service to borrow materials for a small cost from other Texas libraries. Meeting room space is available for Literacy Council tutoring sessions and for organizations with educational aims. The Georgetown Public Library works in concert with other community organizations, i.e. Georgetown Project and Georgetown Independent School District, and the Assistance League of the Georgetown Area, in an effort to provide solutions, within programming, to social and educational concerns. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Added 744 linear feet of shelving though grants from the Lower Colorado River Authority and the Georgetown Library Foundation. • Installed security cameras inside and outside the library. • Began a new volunteer program with the assistance of the revitalized Friends of the Library organization. • Received professional advice about more effective utilization of library space and began making changes to create more work space for the staff. 110 • Began grant process to acquire from the Gates Foundations four new computers to use for public Internet access. • Received Texas Book Festival Award in the amount of $1,500 to replace adult science books that were damaged when the roof leaked. • Produced, through the donated services of Communication Arts Multimedia, Inc., a video to use for library fund=raising. • Expanded our collection to include music CDs through donations from the United Way. • Added the Williamson County Sun to our microfilm collection through a grant from the Georgetown Library Foundation. • Responding to patron requests, and through a grant from the United Way, purchased a free- standing outdoor book return, which is located adjacent to the parking lot. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Add four public access Internet terminals, to meet public demand. • Rearrange library space to operate more efficiently and to make room for additional equipment. • Strengthen relations among the Library Advisory Board, the Georgetown Library Foundation, and the Friends of the Georgetown Library. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Circulation 220,430 240,4319 260,000 270,000 295,000 2) Registrations, new patron 3,006 1,836* 2,500 2,000 2,200 3) Books added per year 11,517 12,000 13,000 11,000*** 12,000**** 4) Children's program attendance 8,672** 9,014 16,000 11,000 16,000 * 97/98 statistics reflect large increases due to initiation of GISD student card (Kid's cards) program. By 98199, most students were registered. ** During 1998, the summer reading program activities were heldat the Community Center, which offered more space than the library meeting room. However, attendance fell off. In an effort to regain our previous high attendance rates, during the summers of 1999 and 2000 the activities are being held at the library. 830,361 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's *** The Library was without a catalogerfor three months, so bookprocessing slowed down. * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual **** Since our book budget will not be increased in 2000101, the number of books added will level off. ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 10/6.25 10/6.25 10/6.25 it Employees 11/5 11/5 451,827 483,881 482,767 Personnel 518,189 (7.3%) 518,189 (0.0%) 214,813 212,274 212,274 Operations 213,110 (0.4%) 213,110 (0.0%) 78,374 99,062 99,062 Capital 99,062 (0.0%) 99,062 (0.0%) 745,014 795,217 794,103 830,361 (4.6%) 830,361 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 11 l LIBRARY -- RESTRICTED DONATIONS This fund receives and holds grants and donations received from library patrons, the Georgetown Library Foundation, and from other sources. Funds are used to purchase materials specified by the donor or selected by the staff. The Public Library receives materials and services funded through the Central Texas Library System, one of ten cooperative library systems in Texas that distributes state funds to public libraries. The amount of materials received is based in part on the population of the City of Georgetown and on the amount of local funds spent on the Public Library. 99100 00/01 01/02 98199 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 16,850 17,206 26,586 33,544 0 REVENUES: Donations 27,340 26,000 1,600 1,100 1,100 Interest & Other 4,515 1,100 27,000 20,000 20,000 Grants 14,476 18,358 Total Revenues 46,331 27,100 46,958 21,100 21,100 EXPENSES: Parks, Library & Recreation 36,595 Community Services 40,000 40,000 54,644 21,100 Total Expenses 36,595 40,000 40,000 54,644 21,100 Ending Fund Balance 26,586 4,306 33,544 0 0 COMMUNITY SERVICES 112 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00< GE�RG�T 01 yz This page intentionally left blank COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 113 WHAT WE DO: Sanitation funds, expended in this department, are paid to the solid waste contractor (Texas Disposal Systems) for services to residential and commercial customers. The Contractor provides all curbside garbage and recycling pickup for City customers. Charges for the Joint Services Fund allocations are also included. Additionally, this department funds the City's pro -rata share of the Household Hazardous Waste Clean-up Day for Williamson County. Oversight responsibilities and monitoring of these services are conducted by Community Services Administration. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Analyzed services and revised the contract which includes service quality and customer satisfaction measures, and a plan for contractor payments based upon successful performance as compared against these measures. • Conducted a customer survey, to determine citizen opinions about the service fees and what performance issues are most important. • Conducted, with the Collection Station, fall and spring neighborhood clean up efforts to remove bulky waste and brush from areas identified by Code Enforcement staff as most critical and in need of extra services. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Develop and implement plan to combine Collection Station and Sanitation operations. • Analyze benefits of establishing a transfer station in Georgetown for Solid Waste services. • Work with Williamson County and other cities to determine options for collection and disposal of household hazardous waste materials. 114 • Sponsor, with the Collection Station, special neighborhood clean-up projects. • Continue to work with Code Enforcement staff on efforts to remove bulky waste and brush from areas identified as most critical and in need of extra services. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 99/00 00/01 1) Average # Homes Served 9,056 9,975 9,700 10,350 10,975 2) Total pounds of solid waste Projected Base Actual Budget Actual collected N/A 20,084,288* 24,300,000 31,600,000 33,500,000 3) Recycling participation rate N/A 42.68% 45% 42% 45% 4) Household Hazardous Waste Day Customers 676 490 600 840 850 5) Percentage of residential customer complaints as compared to service opportunities (average monthly) N/A 0.11% N/A 0.05% 0.05% 6) Percentage of commercial customer complaints as compared to service opportunities. (average monthly) N/A 0.08% N/A 0.10% 0.08% • New indicator for FY 98/99. Figure represents only 9 months for FY 98/99. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 38,488 41,115 42,100 Franchise Fees 47,500 (12.8%) 49,450 (4.1%) 51,710 58,153 69,981 General Fund Alloc. 66,865 (45%) 66,865 (0.0*�0) 95,855 106,117 104,785 Joint Svs Allocations 108,738 (3.8%) 108,738 (0.0%) 10,000 20,000 20,000 Special Svc & Legal 20,000 (0.o%) 20,000 (0.0%) 1,455,740 1,570,675 1,614,000 Texas Disposal Systems 2,055,882 (27.4%) 2,138,903 (4.0%) 4,882 5,000 5,000 Contingency 5,000 (0.0%) 5,000 (0.0%) 2,474 2,000 2,000 Programs & Projects 2,000 (0.0%) 2,000 (0.01/) 1,659,149 1,803,060 1,857,866 2,305,985 (24.1%) 2,390,956 (3.7%) * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Beginning October 1, .1998, the City contracted with a new company for solid waste and recycling services. This service emphasizes quality, customer satisfaction methods and City values. Increasing operational costs by the contractor results in a rate increase to offset these costs, effective in December 2000. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 115 WHAT WE DO: The Collection Station operates the public drop-off for solid waste services. Staff evaluate materials, determine residency, and charge fees based upon a service fee schedule. In addition, staff mows and maintains the closed landfill area. The Collection Station also operates a tree and brush mulching program and the recycling operation for waste oil, oil filters, batteries, and antifreeze. The Collection Station chips brush brought in and the wood chips are given to citizens at no charge. The City participates with local funds and staff support from this department in a Household Hazardous Waste clean-up program in conjunction with other cities, Williamson County, Brazos River Authority, and the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC). WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Planned and conducted a fall and spring Community Clean-up effort with assistance from Texas Disposal Systems, the Code Enforcement officers, police officers, and Georgetown Project VISTA volunteers. • Provided staff support to the Household Hazardous Waste Clean -Up event held in April, 2000. • Provided staff support to solid waste, recycling and bulky waste program, and assisted the service contractor with customer service issues and special concerns. • Conducted a review of services and fee changes based upon the review and a customer satisfaction survey, completed in the spring, 2000. 116 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Support the Household Hazardous Waste Clean - Up Program. • Support the solid waste, recycling and bulky waste program. • Plan and conduct special neighborhood clean-up projects. • Develop and implement a plan to combine the Collection Station and Sanitation operations. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 - ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED - ACTIVITY IlNDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) Gallons of Oil Recycled 3,636 3,636 3,400 3,500 3,500 2) Number of Customer Visits * N/A 5,500 5,800 6,000 6,000 3) Gallons of Antifreeze * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual Recycled 888 888 200 300 300 4) Cubic Yards of Waste Collected 5,200 5,200 3,900** 4,000 4,000 * New indicator for FY 98/99 **Reflects contract change in solid waste and bulky waste procedures. Curbside service allows additional amounts and bulky waste (up to five cubic yards in addition to the 96 gallon cart) to be picked up weekly. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 1.5/.5 1.5/.5 1.5/.5 # Employees 1.5/.5 1.5/.5 56,684 63,132 63,131 Personnel 62,813 (-0.5^/0) 62,813 (o.o%) 79,618 72,407 72,407 Operations 70,081 (-3.2%) 70,081 (0.o%) 136,302 135,539 135,538 132,894 (-2.0%) 132,894 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The implementation of a new contract with Texas Disposal Systems included changes in solid waste and bulky waste procedures, allowing customers to set out for weekly pick-up, a 96 gallon cart plus up to five additional cubic yards of waste. This change in curbside service has resulted in a decrease in the amount of waste citizens bring to the Collection Station for disposal. Solid waste rates will continually be impacted by the implementation of United States Environmental Protection Agency Subtitle D Regulations and Rules promulgated by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 117 O GE012 O��'DED � This page intentionally left blank. COMMUNITY SERVICES 118 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Development Services Development Services DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Development Services is dedicated to the shared vision of a well-planned Georgetown by working in partnership with the community, building on our heritage and providing service through a customer friendly process. The Development Services Division includes: (1) the Development Support Department encompassing Development Planning, Long Range Planning, and Division Administration/Facilitation; (2) the Development Process Team; and (3) the Inspection Services Department. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 98/99 Actual 99/00 99/00 Projected Budget Actual 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base Development Support 381,316 423,938 405,124 514,585 Development Process Team 404,961 425,558 421,558 354,984 Inspection Services 484,938 498,748 475,604 504,707 514,585 354,984 499,607 TOTAL 1,271,215 1,348,244 1,302,286 1,374,276 1,369,176 DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 119 DEVELOPMENT SERVICES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 10 Inspection Services 24 Total Employees Total Budget $1,374,276 ielopment Support I uevrraxss team Personnel & Operations DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 120 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 EvDS & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.01 Existing undeveloped sites in Georgetown are put to beneficial use. Means (98-03) Support and assist in the development of the Rivery Tract and the entertainment district. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Economic Development, Finance and Administration, Management Services, Parks and Recreation) Means (99-02) Provide support to the Main Street Program and other entities in identifying and classifying a Downtown Business District, to promote and enhance the unique character of the downtown Square. (Development Support, Development Process Team, Economic Development) Means (99-02) Working with the Economic Development Division, promote the Main Street Fagade Fund Renovation Program by completing four renovation projects. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Economic Development) Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. Means (99-04) Aid in the Sponsorship of the Red Poppy Festival to help promote the unique character of Georgetown, especially its downtown historical district. (Development Support, All Divisions) Environmental & Resource Conservation Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development. Focus End 2.01 Sufficient, high quality water is available to meet the current and future needs of citizens and businesses in Georgetown. Priority is given to: 1) human consumption 2) businesses 3) recreation Means (99-05) Continue cooperative partnership with Chisolm Trail Utility District, including modifying service area boundaries and extending leases for Lake Georgetown property. (Development Support, Development Process Team, Community Owned Utilities, Parks and Recreation) Means (00-01) Assist in the development of a backflow prevention cross -connection program to protect the public water system from possible contaminants. (Inspection Services, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) Focus End 2.02 Wildlife is conserved. Means (99-04) Investigate the mitigation plan alternatives for the proposed listing of the Georgetown Salamander on the Endangered Species List. (Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 121 Growth and. Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. Means (98-04) Assist in location and design of City facilities identified in the citywide 10 -year plan to ensure that those facilities contribute to the health of the central business district, promote efficient and safe City operations, improve access by citizens and exemplify urban design standards. (Development Process Team, Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Economic Development, Finance and Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (99-03) Coordinate with the Bureau of the Census to insure a complete and accurate portrayal of Georgetown's population in the City's 2000 Census Program. (Development Support) Means (99-04) Solve common regional problems and concerns by continuing to build partnerships with area cities, other governmental entities and utility providers. (Development Process Team) Means (99-04) Assist Georgetown Independent School District in locating new school sites. (Development Process Team, Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Parks and Recreation) Means (99-05) Coordinate a Geographical Information System task force to improve the City's property addressing policies and procedures. (Development Process Team, Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Finance and Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) Means (00-03) Analyze 2000 Census data as it becomes available. (Development Support, Management Services) Means (00-05) Through comprehensive efforts with Georgetown Independent School District and Community Owned Utilities, assist in utility and traffic flow issues related to the location of new school sites and provide other utility and conservation solutions as necessary. (Development Process Team, Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Parks and Recreation) Historic Preservation Policy End 5.00 Prehistoric and historic resources are preserved, protected and promoted for the benefit of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (98-01) Support private efforts to renovate the Shotgun House. (Inspection Services, Management Services) Means (99-04) Provide support and assistance to the Downtown Business District Design Committee for the creation of a downtown business district. (Development Support, Economic Development, Management Services) Housing Policy End 6.00 All citizens have access to safe and adequate housing opportunities. Means (98-04) Assist Community Services in reviewing, adopting and implementing a Housing Plan Element. (Development Support, Community Services, Management Services) DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 122 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Public Information and Education Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (99-01) Participate in the City public information and awareness team. (Development Support, All Divisions) Means (00-05) Recruit volunteers through various service organizations and programs for City and community projects and services. (Development Process Team, Inspection Services, Community Services, Management Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) Means (00-05) Give notification to Councilmembers representing affected area, neighborhood associations representing affected area and the Georgetown Independent School District of filing of development applications with the City of Georgetown. (Development Process Team) Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens. Means (00-01) Increase the number of Town Hall meetings to provide for structured and public citizen input and feedback regarding municipal operations and issues. (All Departments, All Divisions) Public safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Means (96-06) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the expansion of the "A Safe Place" Program to provide for the safety of youth by providing educational programs in area schools. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Information Resources, Management Services, Parks and Recreation, Police Services) Means (99-01) Assist and support Community Services in developing implementation strategies for housing policies. (Development Support, Community Services) Means (99-01) Assist and support Community Services in identifying City -owned sites available for use in building affordable housing. (Development Support, Community Services, Management Services) Means (99-04) Investigate creation of a fire district within the downtown historic businesses to guide and enhance building codes and zoning. (All Departments, Fire Services, Management Services) Means (00-01) Assist in the update of the Emergency Operations Manual. (Development Support, All Divisions) DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 123 Focus End 8.01 The response times and service levels for emergency services are compatible in all parts of the City. Means (98-04) Assist in locating a future new site for Fire Station No. 1 as identified in the citywide 10 year plan, to ensure that this facility contributes to the safety of the central business district, provides for the efficient balance of fire protection to the citizens, and exemplifies urban design standards. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services, Information Resources and Management Services Means (99-04) Assist Fire Services in conducting a comprehensive community analysis of the Insurance Services Office standards to determine community requirements for reduced insurance ratings. (Development Support, Inspection Services, Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services, Management Services) Recreation and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space, recreation facilities and services, and social and cultural activities contribute to an enhanced quality of life for the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.02 Georgetown has a City wide open space system. Priority has been given to: 1) the tributaries of the San Gabriel River (e.g. Smith Branch, Pecan Branch, Berry Creek) 2) preservation of key open space views 3) enhancement of park and recreational facilities 4) promotion of environmental conservation and/ or protection 5) providing the City with a "land bank" 6) providing buffering from more intensive uses Means (00-01) Work with Parks and Recreation, Management Services and Community Owned Utilities to establish criteria and identify possible park sites for future development. (Development Process Team and Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services, Parks and Recreation) Transportation Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Means (97-02) Identify, jointly with Fire Services, Police Services and Community Owned Utilities, traffic flows and emergency vehicle access to reduce accidents and improve traffic movement. (Development Process Team, Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services, Police Services) Means (97-05) Work with Williamson County, Management Services and Community Owned Utilities on alignment of the following roadways: (Development Process Team, Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) • Inner Loop Road, west of Interstate Highway 35 • D.B. Wood Road • Booty's Road • Remaining segments of Inner Loop Road, east of Interstate Highway 35 • County Road 115 124 ANNUAL OPERATING SERVICES NG PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 1 1 Means (97-05) Work with Williamson County, Management Services, and Community Owned Utilities on construction of the following bridges: (Development Process Team, Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) • Below the dam at Lake Georgetown • Between State Highway 29 and Williams Drive (including bridge crossings to improve traffic flow west of Interstate Highway 35) • Spring Valley Road bridge • Inner Loop bridge, between State Highway 29 and F.M. 971 Means (98-04) Work with the Texas Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration to obtain funding for the extension of State Highway 130. (Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) Means (98-04) Work with the Texas Department of Transportation to construct the remaining frontage roads along Interstate Highway 35 in the Georgetown area. (Development Process Team, Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) Means (99-01) Incorporate sidewalk policy and bike lane section designs into the Subdivision Regulations. (Development Support, Management Services) Means (99-02) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the design and construction of the Rivery Bridge. (Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Finance and Administration, Management Services) Means (99-04) Cooperate and coordinate with Williamson County Unified Road System and Community Owned Utilities to provide an organized transportation roadway system. (Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Finance and Administration) Means (99-04) Work with the Texas Department of Transportation, Community Owned Utilities, and Management Services on the early coordination of the following projects: (Development Support, City Manager's Office, Community Owned Utilities) • Widen Austin Avenue, from 6th Street to Williams Drive, including the two bridges spanning the North and South San Gabriel River • Widen Williams Drive, from Cedar Breaks Road to Del Webb Boulevard • Realign F.M. 1460 to F.M. 2243 at Austin Avenue • Widen 0.75 miles on Leander Road, west of Georgetown Independent School District property • Widen Highway 971 east of Business 35 to F.M. 1105 • Install traffic signal at Austin Avenue and Morrow Street • Widen and reverse the direction of entrance/ exit ramps on Interstate Highway 35 • Install traffic signal at Inner Loop and State Highway 29 • Install traffic signal at Inner Loop Road and F.M. 1460 Means (00-01) Assist in the construction of the new/ remodeled Airport Terminal Building. (Development Process Team, Inspection Services, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Finance and Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 125 Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (98-03) Work with Legal Services, the Building Standards Commission and Community Owned Utilities for the enforcement of nuisance codes and ordinances and for the removal of sub -standard structures. (Inspection Services, Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services, Management Services) Means (99-01) Work with all divisions to implement the automation of code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (Inspection Services, All Divisions) Means (99-03) Develop policies and programs which implement the Urban Design Plan, including property maintenance, Subdivision Regulations, and Zoning Ordinance update, including a sunset review of these ordinances. (Development Support, Development Process Team, Management Services) Utilities/Energy Policy End 12.00 City owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Means (98-04) Assist in location, design and construction of a new Municipal Service Center, as identified in the citywide ten year plan, to promote efficient and safe city operations, improve access by citizens, and exemplify urban design standards. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Finance and Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Focus End 12.01 Customers of the City's electric utility have a range of choices with respect to rates, service levels and power supply options. Means (99-04) Work with Georgetown Independent School District (GISD), Verizon, Cox Communications, Information Resources, and Community Owned Utilities to develop a telecommunication infrastructure throughout the City with local franchisees and other governmental agencies. (Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Information Resources, Management Services) Focus End 12.02 City water and wastewater customers in all certified areas receive services, which exceed state and federal standards. Means (95-01) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the construction of the Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant facility. (Development Support, Community Owned Utilities, Finance and Administration, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (97-02) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the expansion of the wastewater collection system to provide wastewater service opportunities to residents in the Booty's Road and Cedar Breaks/ Williams Drive areas (including: Turtle Bend and Oakcrest Subdivisions). (Development Process Team, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 126 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (99-04) Work with Community Owned Utilities to implement and enforce the annual testing of the Cross -Connection Control Regulations for water quality through plumbing codes and ordinances. (Inspection Services, Community Owned Utilities) Focus End 12.03 The City's stormwater drainage system efficiently and effectively protects the health and safety of Georgetown's residents and minimizes the negative effects of standing water and urban runoff. Means (96-01) Assist Community Owned Utilities in reducing stormwater runoff impact on the San Gabriel River by constructing detention and retention ponds and filter beds, installing and replacing curbs and gutters in the Old Town area, and construction of drainage facilities. (Development Process Team, Community Owned Utilities) • Texas Department of Transportation Retaining Wall • San Gabriel Parks dam and retaining walls • 4th to 9th between Elm and Ash Streets Means (00-05) In cooperation with Community Owned Utilities, maintain an on-going Regional Stormwater Plan consistent with State and Federal guidelines. (Development Process Team, Inspection Services, Community Owned Utilities) Facilities and Services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Means (98-04) Continue ongoing recruitment efforts to ensure diversity in the applicant pool and compatibility with core values for every City position. (All Departments, All Divisions) Means (99-01) Assist in a citywide competitive fee analysis for all fees and present recommended changes to City Council. (All Departments, All Divisions) Means (99-03) Develop and implement individualized career development and citywide succession plans. (All Departments, All Divisions) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 127 WHAT WE Do: The Development Process Team is a multi -disciplinary, semi -autonomous department made up of varied staff functions and responsibilities necessary to address the full range of issues that are encountered in the development process. The development process ranges from the subdivision of a vacant piece of property, to the construction of a new home or business, to the expansion of an existing business. Customers are able to find the answers they need in one location and from staff that represent all the disciplines that may be involved. The department provides sound, reasonable, and professional guidance to the Mayor and City Council, Planning and Zoning Commission, Zoning Board of Adjustment, City Manager, other City Divisions, property owners, developers, community organizations and local citizens regarding the physical growth and development of the City of Georgetown and surrounding areas. Advice provided by the department is based on the application of the City Zoning Ordinance, Subdivision Regulations, Century Plan, other City codes, regulations and plans, State statutory and regulatory requirements, and sound planning principles. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Hosted meetings with other governmental agencies, Georgetown Independent School District and area utility providers. • Assisted retail, electric distribution customers through the development process to enhance the City's competitive position as a utility provider. • Participated in the creation and implementation of a policy and procedure for addressing properties. • Assisted in the location and design of the City facilities identified in the citywide 10 -year plan to ensure that those facilities contribute to the health of the central business district, promote efficient and safe City operations, improve access by citizens and exemplify urban design standards. • Enhanced the parkland dedication process by coordinating commercial and subdivision projects with Parks and Recreation. 128 • Assisted Georgetown Independent School District in locating new school sites and with the development process of those sites for a middle school and an elementary school. • Conducted, with the Main Street Program, a charette to focus attention on downtown planning and solicit community ideas for improvements. • Provided support and assistance to the Main Street Program in the study of a need for the downtown business district. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Host regular meetings with other governmental agencies, Georgetown Independent School District and area utility providers to create good working relationships and improve the communications between entities. • Provide continuous refinement to the Development Process to insure delivery of the highest level of customer service by rebuilding and reorganizing the Development Process Team. • Enhance the City's competitive position to obtain and retain retail electric distribution customers, assisting them throughout all stages of the development process. • Participate in the implementation of a policy and procedure for addressing properties. • Assist in location and design of City facilities identified in the citywide 10 -year plan to ensure that those facilities contribute to the health of the central business district, promote efficient and safe city operations, improve access by citizens and exemplify urban design standards. • Assist Georgetown Independent School Districtin locating new school sites. • Support and assist the new Economic Development Division and Main Street Program with the Historic Preservation Commission in preparation for the Commission being supported by the Development Services Process Team. • Implement the Downtown Business District as a new zoning district. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 01/02 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED PERFORMANCE MEASURES FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00 01 7/0 7/0 # Employees 1) Final decisions consistent with 298,298 Personnel 103,397 97,310 93,310 Operations staff recommendation 79% 95% 98% 90% 95% 2) Applications approved Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed administratively 14% 15% 15% 15% 15% 3) Final decisions on variances and map amendments consistent with staff recommendation 78% 90% 90% 85% 90% 4) Single family lots platted 900 936 913 420 500 5) Non -single family lots platted 30 27 45 35 40 6) Detailed Development Plans 15 50 50 41 50 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 99/00 Projected Base 98/99 99/00 Projected 7/0 Actual Budget Actual 42,214 (-54.8%) 7.25/0 7/0 7/0 # Employees 300,438 298,298 298,298 Personnel 103,397 97,310 93,310 Operations 1,126 29,950 29,950 Capital 404,961 425,558 421,558 Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change*) (% Change**) 7/0 7/0 312,770 (4.90/.) 312,770 (0.0%) 42,214 (-54.8%) 42,214 (0.0%) 0 (-100.0%) 0 (N/A) 354,984 (-15.801.) 354,984 (0.0%) 129 WHAT WE Do: Development Support includes the Division's Administrative Staff which encompasses the Division Chief/Team Facilitator, the Division's Administrative Assistant, the Chief Development Planner, Chief Long Range Planner and Long Range Planner, along with the Development Account Specialist and the Division Receptionist. The Department is responsible for providing technical planning support to the Development Process Team to enable them to focus on development process review and approval. The Department promotes the long-term health and prosperity of the community through the preparation and recommendation for adoption of plans and ordinances designed to guide future growth and development of the City and surrounding region. In addition, the Department supports and facilitates the Development Process Team, by ensuring all necessary linkages exist between the Development Process Team, which functions as a semi -autonomous work team, and the traditional organizational structure. For example, the Development Support Department provides technical/administrative support for budget development, performance evaluation, employee training and development, and ordinance revision. The Development Support Staff serve as "enablers" who increase the Team's ability to function smoothly by minimizing administrative distractions from the responsibilities of serving customers in the development process. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Worked with Community Owned Utilities to develop a transportation improvement strategy for the community through preparation of a detailed improvement plan for individual road segments, including an analysis of existing and future traffic levels, identification of long term improvements and cost estimates. 130 • Addressed the implications of recent changes in the State's annexation statutes. • Prepared a revised ordinance covering manufactured housing. • Assisted Community Services in the completion of the Housing Plan Element of the Century Plan. • Assisted the Development Process Team in the transition and acclimation of new staff members to the team due to turnover. • Assisted with the City's 2000 Census effort in coordination with the Bureau of the Census by completing boundary and annexation surveys to report the current incorporated area of Georgetown. • Developed policies and programs that implement the Urban Design Plan, including Subdivision Regulations and Zoning Ordinance update. • Worked with Williamson County and Texas Department of Transportation on planning and construction of strategic roadway projects. WHAT WE PLAN To ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Analyze and distribute the 2000 Census results received from the Census Bureau. • Conduct sunset review of the urban design revisions to the Zoning Ordinance and Subdivision Regulations and propose modifications as necessary. • Assist the Development Process Team in the transition and acclimation of new staff members to the team due to turnover. • Work with Williamson County and Texas Department of Transportation on planning and construction of strategic roadway projects. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base - Actual Budget Actual (% Change*) (% Change**) 6/0.5 7/0 7/0 # Employees 7/0 7/0 269,691 320,090 302,076 Personnel 353,515 (17.o%) 353,515 (0.0%) 107,625 103,848 103,048 Operations 161,070 (56.3%) 161,070 (0.0%) 4,000 0 0 Capital 0 (N/A) 0 (N/A) 381,316 423,938 405,124 514,585 (27.0%) 514,585 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 131 WHAT WE DO: Inspection Services provides building construction inspection, utility infrastructure inspection, and code enforcement. This department ensures direct coordination and linkage between plan review, permits and on-site inspection. Inspection Services ensures that the construction phase of the development process meets the expectations of the City's customers and provides for administration and enforcement of applicable City codes and ordinances. Specific Department responsibilities include: • Issue permits for any building, electrical, plumbing and mechanical (HVAC) work occurring within the City limits. • Issue permits for City water, sewer and/or electrical system connections in the extra territorial jurisdiction (ETJ). • Provide field inspections for all utility infrastructure construction resulting from private development. • Provide field inspections for all construction activity occurring within the City or connecting to City utilities. • Review all residential building construction plans within the community. • Issue electrical licenses. • Enforcement of the City's construction codes, Zoning Ordinance, Sign Ordinance, Unsafe and Dangerous Buildings Ordinance, Floodplain Management Ordinance, and Housing Code. • Coordinate with Police Services, Fire Services and Development Process Team for property addressing throughout the City. • Provide support to the City's Building Standards Commission. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Continued implementation of the Energy Code and Rebate Program for energy conservation in construction, in coordination with Community Owned Utilities. • Assisted with the Code Enforcement Task Force, which revised the code enforcement process and created and implemented a one-stop calling point in order to provide a more aggressive means of identification and correction of violations. 132 • Assisted with the 911 Addressing Team to create and implement a new addressing policy for Georgetown and its extra -territorial jurisdiction (ETJ). • Updated the Georgetown Electrical Ordinance with various electrical licensing requirements and updated the use of the National Electrical Code from the 1993 Edition to the 1999 Edition, through local ordinance adoption. • Coordinated with Community Owned Utilities for the implementation of the Backflow Prevention Program for the protection of the City's water supply through building construction methods. • Initiated the review for updating of the residential and commercial building codes from the 1994 Standard Building Code to the 2000 International Building Code and the Residential One -Two Family Dwelling Code. • Initiated the removal of the Shoney's motel project by the direction of the Building Standards Commission with assistance of Community Owned Utilities. WHAT WE PLANT TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Continue review and updating of the residential and commercial building codes from the 1994 Standard Building Code to the 2000 International Building Code and the Residential One -Two Family Dwelling Code before the Building Standards Commission and the citizens. • Continue implementation of the enhanced code enforcement process with all internal divisions and external customers to provide a one-stop calling point in order to eliminate nuisance code violations. • Continue implementation of the new 911 Addressing policy with the Development Process Team, Williamson County, Fire Services and Police Services. • Continue working with Community Owned Utilities for the full citywide implementation of the Backflow Prevention process, for the protection of the public water supply. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 6) Code enforcement: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED PERFORMANCE MEASURES FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Percentage of residential plans 90% 90% 95% c) Dangerous structures 94,887 (12.3%) 89,787 (-5.4%) reviewed and permits issued 504,707 (6.1%) 499,607 (-1.0%) removed * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual within 10 working days 85% 90% 97% 93% 97% 2) Percentage of commercial by property owner 10 14 10 16 10 plans reviewed and permits issued within 30 working days 80% 85% 90% 87% 90% 3) Percentage of inspections performed within a 2 working day period 70% 90% 96% 85% 90% 4) Residential permits issued 950 825 750 750 750 Construction cost $106,236,981 $91,164,918 $87,000,000 $90,000,000 $91,000,000 5) Commercial permits issued 30 30 35 35 30 Construction cost $39,000,000 $51,000,000 $42,000,000 $42,000,000 47,000,000 6) Code enforcement: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected a) Code violations investigated 1300 965 2000 2000 2400 b) Percentage of compliance 85% 90% 90% 90% 95% c) Dangerous structures 94,887 (12.3%) 89,787 (-5.4%) 484,938 498,748 475,604 504,707 (6.1%) 499,607 (-1.0%) removed * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual by City 5 3 5 4 7 by property owner 10 14 10 16 10 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change*) (% Change**) 9/1 9/1 9/1 # Employees 9/1 9/1 381,764 413,971 391,102 Personnel 409,820 (4.8%) 409,820 (0.0%) 103,174 84,777 84,502 Operations 94,887 (12.3%) 89,787 (-5.4%) 484,938 498,748 475,604 504,707 (6.1%) 499,607 (-1.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed DEVELOPMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 133 This page intentionally left blank. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 134 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 �� � ,.,,� .� �; � a 7 ,�.� � ,� f J J Economic Development Administration Page 140 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Economic Development Division is a newly created division for the City of Georgetown. During Fiscal Year 1999/00 the City Council appointed a task force to develop recommendations for an organizational form for the community's economic development. The task force recommended the creation of this division, therefore this division structure was approved by the Council. The structure includes a Council appointed Economic Development Commissior; charged with the responsibility of developing goals, policies, and strategies for economic development for the City of Georgetown. Working under the direction of this Commission and the City Manager, the Director of Economic Development will be responsible for implementation of the policies, strategies, and oversight of operations. Responsibilities will include business assistance (such as workforce training and development and retention issues), industrial recruitment and retention, the Convention and Visitors Bureau, and the Main Street Program. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Administration 0 0 0 123,150 123,150 Convention & Visitors Bureau 304,584 276,573 266,912 159,134 159,134 Main Street 0 0 0 68,272 68,272 Main Street Fagade SRF 8,460 14,800 6,100 1,200 1,200 TOTAL 313,044 291,373 273,012 351,756 351,756 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 135 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Employees - Full Time Equivalents 1.5 Main Stree 4.5 Total Employees 1 CVB Operations Total Budget $350,556 Personnel & Operations ! Administration Personnel ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 136 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 EN,Ds & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.0601 The downtown is economically viable. Means (99-02) Coordinate the Main Street Program in cooperation with other City Departments, Downtown Georgetown Association (DGA) and other merchants to promote and enhance the unique character of the downtown Square. (Main Street Program, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. Means (00-01) Coordinate with the Economic Development Commission to update and modify the Economic Development Vision and Strategic Plan. (All Departments) Means (99-02) Provide support to the Visitor Information Center to market the community to the visiting customer and conduct a feasibility study to determine if an additional visitor center in IH 35 is needed. (Main Street Program, Convention & Visitors Bureau) Means (99-02) Identify local opportunities to promote community awareness of the value of tourism to the public. (Convention & Visitors Bureau) Historic Preservation Policy End 5.00 Prehistoric and historic resources are preserved, protected and promoted for the benefit of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-02) Promote the Main Street Fagade Fund Renovation Program by completing four renovation _ projects. (Main Street Program, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Management Services) Public Information and Education Policy End 7.0 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 137 Means (99-02) Provide Hospitality Training seminars to the community three times a year to preserve and enhance the unique character of the citizens of Georgetown. (Convention & Visitors Bureau) Recreational and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space and recreation facilities and services contribute to an enhanced quality of life for citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. Means (99-04) Coordinate special community festivals and events working with Parks & Recreation and other City divisions. (Convention & Visitors Bureau, Main Street Program, Community Owned Utilities, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 138 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 FA'v4 O GEORG�T �D DE This page intentionally left blank. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 139 WHAT WE DO: Economic Development Administration supervises the Convention and Visitors Bureau and Main Street Program, and implements economic development goals, policies, and strategies established by the Economic Development Commission and City Council. Operations of the division also include business assistance such as workforce training and development and retention issues, and industrial recruitment and retention. The Division provides staffing support for the Economic Development Commission. 1� WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Hire an Economic Development Division Director and support staff. • Work with the Economic Development Commission to develop and implement a process to identify and adopt a clear and detailed community -embraced vision of economic development goals and strategies for Georgetown. • Work with the Commission and Division to develop detailed economic development policies i consistent with the community vision. • Work with the Commission to develop criteria for selection of a contractor to perform industrial recruitment and retention functions. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 140 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) On-going indicators to be determined in upcoming year based upon Commission's and Council's goals and policies for economic development. ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 N/A N/A N/A N/A TDB 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) # Employees 2/0 2/0 Personnel 107,597 (N/A) 107,597 (o.o%) Operations 15,553 (N/A) 15,553 (0.0%) 0 0 0 123,150 (N/A) 123,150 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: This particular department is newly created and partially funded by hotel/motel taxes and transfers from other funds. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 141 WHAT WE DO: The Convention & Visitors Bureau develops and promotes tourism and convention activity in Georgetown, thereby creating jobs, increasing the total revenue gained by the tourism industry, and improving the overall economic climate of abla Georgetown. This is achieved through the purchase of media advertising to target specific visitor and convention markets and through the solicitation of A business through trade and travel shows, special event promotions and promotional brochure development R and distribution. fA WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Hosted an international media familiarization tour in conjunction with the POW WOW International Convention, a gathering of travel representatives held in Dallas. • Increased Georgetown's media exposure with articles in Texas Highways (December issue), and Southern Living (September and March issues). • Assisted with the promotion, merchandise, and organization of the first annual Red Poppy iA Festival. j� • Participated in a cooperative advertising effort with Texas Economic Development Tourism 6 Division. r • Obtained an award of a photo display area at a �y Travel Information Center for six months. 142 • Conducted four hospitality training seminars for area retailers, accommodations, attractions, and Chamber of Commerce. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Continue to target travel writers to further increase media exposure of Georgetown as a tourist destination. • Assist the Main Street Program in hosting the second annual Red Poppy Festival. • Create an occupancy allocation for organizations to request hotel/motel occupancy tax for legally allowed promotional projects. • Design with assistance from the advertising agency, a new promotional image for our visitor guide, calendar of events, dining guide, print advertisement, and web site. • Implement a "conversion study" to calculate the results of the CVB's advertising campaigns. • Conduct three hospitality training seminars for area retailers, accommodations, attractions, and the Chamber of Commerce. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The Convention and Visitors Bureau is moving from the Community Services Division to a newly created Economic Development Division for FY'2000/01. The Main Street Program's budget and activities are also separated from the Convention and Visitors Bureau operations for the first time since the Main Street Program was re-established. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 143 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Group Sales 35 53 54 40 40 2) Convention Sales 15 16 16 25 25 3) Visitor Inquiries 7,331 13,000 14,000 12,000 14,000 4) Goodie Bags for Groups 3,435 4,100 5,000 4,000 5,000 5) Hospitality Training Seminars 0 0 5 4 3 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGETAND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99%00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 3/0.5 3/0.5 3/0.5 # Employees 1/0 1/0 138,229 127,100 109,371 Personnel 48,372 (-55.8%) 48,372 (o.o%) 166,355 149,473 157,541 Operations 110,762 (-29.7%) 110,762 (o.o%) 304,584 276,573 266,912 159,134 (40.4%) 159,134 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/OlProposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The Convention and Visitors Bureau is moving from the Community Services Division to a newly created Economic Development Division for FY'2000/01. The Main Street Program's budget and activities are also separated from the Convention and Visitors Bureau operations for the first time since the Main Street Program was re-established. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 143 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM FUND The Economic Development and Tourism Fund accounts for the receipt and expenditures of funds received by the City from the assessment of hotel and motel occupancy tax as well as transfers from other funds to support economic development. The local hotel and motel occupancy tax rate is 7% of the room rate. The state tax is an additional 6% and is remitted directly to the State Comptroller by each hotel/motel establishment, and the usage of these funds is restricted by state law governing expenditures of hotel/motel tax. 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 70,178 57,000 57,000 Beginning Fund Balance 110,038 68,876 58,887 70,178 57,000 REVENUES: Operating Interest & other Transfers In 237,911 274,878 12,488 5,800 3,034 274,878 279,878 292,556 3,325 3,500 4,000 54,000 54,000 Total Revenues 253,433 280,678 278,203 337,378 350,556 EXPENSES: Economic Development Admin 123,150 123,150 Main Street 68,272 68,272 Convention & Visitors Bureau 304,584 276,573 266,912 159,134 159,134 Total Expenses 304,584 276,573 266,912 350,556 350,556 Ending Fund Balance 58,887 72,981 70,178 57,000 57,000 RESERVATIONS: Contingency Unreserved Fund Balance 61,500 57,000 57,000 57,000 (2,613) 15,981 13,178 0 57,000 0 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 144 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 O GEORG�J>_ UD This page intentionally left blank. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 145 WHAT WE DO: Main Street is a symbol of community economic health, local quality of life, pride, and community history. A vital Main Street retains and creates jobs, which also means a stronger tax base. Main Street districts become tourist attractions by virtue of the character of buildings, location, selection of unique businesses, and events held there. This is all achieved because Main Street provides an important civic forum, where members of the community can congregate. The Main Street Program hosts parades, special events and promotions that reinforce an intangible sense of community. The Main Street Program is a revitalization program designed to enhance the unique character of the downtown, while at the same time promoting downtown marketing strategies, providing educational and technical assistance to the building owners, and maintaining the beauty of Downtown Georgetown. The Main Street Program also provides staff assistance to the Historic Preservation Commission, and coordinates volunteers for the Visitor's Center. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Planned, raised funding for, promoted and coordinated the City's first annual Red Poppy Festival, to promote downtown businesses. • Marketed the Main Street Fagade Fund to continually improve the character of the historic downtown district. • Conducted, with Development Services, a charrette to focus attention on downtown planning and solicit community ideas for improvements. • Planned and hosted the first Texas Main Street Manager Dinner, in memory of Anice Reed, attended by Main Street Managers from throughout the State. 146 • Prepared, submitted and received certified Local Government Grant for the charrette and historical preservation training for the Historic Preservation Commissioners. • Assisted Development Services in the creation of a Downtown Business District. • Awarded two grants from the Main Street Facade Fund. • Developed a low interest loan program for the Main Street Facade Fund. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Plan and coordinate the second annual Red Poppy Festival. • Formulate and implement Awards Luncheon for 2000 McKinney Downtown Conference for the Texas Downtown Association. • Provide ongoing education for the entire community concerning the Main Street Program and the importance of downtown revitalization beyond the Town Square Historic District. • Recruit and train new and replacement volunteers for the Visitor Center. • Organize Main Street promotions in conjunction with the Downtown Georgetown Association, to help bring business to downtown merchants. • Work with merchants to help implement the Downtown Business District. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) Visitor Inquiries 2) Volunteer trainings 3) Volunteer Appreciation Events ACTUAL ACTUAL FY 97/98 FY 98/99 7,331 13,000 6 12 2 3 BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00 01 14,000 14,000 15,000 12 10 12 3 3 4 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) ## Employees Personnel Operations 0 0 0 Employees: full time / part time FTE's Percent change of 00/O1Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/O1 Proposed 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 1/0.5 1/0.5 39,593 (N/A) 39,593 (o.o%) 28,679 (N/A) 28,679 (o.o%) 68,272 (N/A) 68,272 (o.o%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The Main Street Program is moving from the Community Services Division to a newly created Economic Development Division for FY 2000/01. The Program's budget and activities are also separated from the Convention and Visitors Bureau operations for the first time. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 147 MAIN STREET FACADE FUND The Main Street Facade Fund consists of private donations, which are available to building/property owners to provide assistance in maintaining the appearance of the downtown historic district. The funds are distributed through an application/approval process in two forms: as a low-interest loan or a grant. During 1999, the Fund awarded two grants to businesses in the Downtown Square. 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 0 14,409 5,709 0 0 REVENUES: Interest & other 7,660 391 391 200 200 Donations 6,509 0 0 1,000 1,000 Total Revenues 14,169 391 391 1,200 1,200 EXPENSES: Economic Development 8,460 14,800 6,100 1,200 1,200 Total Expenses 8,460 14,800 6,100 1,200 1,200 Ending Fund Balance 5,709 0 0 0 0 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 148 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 finance & Adm *nistratl*on J� J Finance & Administration Administration Page 158 r Municipal Couri Pa.oe 170 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION The Finance & Administration Division serves City departments and citizens through Accounting, Administration, Facilities Maintenance, Fleet Management, Municipal Court, Purchasing & Properties and the Utility Office. The Division also manages the City's internal service funds for Facilities and Fleet. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Accounting 280,480 319,679 310,117 344,780 343,280 Administration 297,880 312,507 312,507 334,103 288,103 Facilities Maintenance 54,750 55,768 55,509 57,418 57,418 Facilities Main. Contracts 349,480 420,861 420,861 551,535 452,135 Vehicle Service Center 366,973 396,346 395,929 420,376 420,376 Capital Replacements & Ins. 800,545 639,546 639,068 689,725 746,595 Municipal Court 133,671 156,040 155,125 159,669 159,669 Court Fees SRF 0 5,000 4,000 20,000 20,000 Purchasing & Properties 283,780 321,994 315,231 340,592 340,592 Utility Office 576,518 584,667 573,241 562,624 562,624 TOTAL 3,144,077 3,212,408 3,181,588 3,480,822 3,390,792 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 149 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION Employees - Full Time Equivalents 31.75 Total Employees 9 Utility 6 Pw 2.5 Municipal Court venting 2 Administration Facilities Maintenance Svc Center Personnel, Operations, & Capital Operation Total Budget $3,460,822 Capital Personnel FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 150 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDS & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.01 Existing undeveloped sites in Georgetown are put to beneficial use. Means (99-02) Support and assist in the development of the Rivery Tract and the entertainment district. (Administration, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Economic Development, Fire Services, Management Services, Parks and Recreation) Environmental and. Resource Conservation Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development. Focus End 2.01 Sufficient, high-quality water is available to meet the current and future needs of citizens and businesses in Georgetown. Priority is given to: 1) human consumption 2) businesses 3) recreation Means (98-03) Assist Community Owned Utilities in developing an irrigation/effluent utility ordinance and reuse policy to expand the use of effluent water sources to irrigate City parks, open spaces, and area golf courses, and to reduce removal of water from the Edward's Aquifer. (Administration, Utility Office, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services, Parks & Recreation) Historic Preservation Policy End 5.00 Prehistoric and historic resources are preserved, protected and promoted for the benefit of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-02) Assist with promoting the Main Street Facade Fund Renovation Program by completing four renovation projects. (Facilities Maintenance, Main Street Program, Community Owned Utilities, -- Development Services, Management Services) Public Information and. Education Policy End 7.00 City -owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 151 Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (99-01) Prepare citizen -oriented guides for City finances and debt structure as part of a citywide public education initiative. (Administration, City Manager's Office, Information Resources) Means (99-01) Participate in the City's public information and awareness team. (All Divisions) Public safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Means (97-01) Assist Fire Services with the design, bidding, and construction of Fire Station No. 4. (Purchasing & Properties, Fire Services) Means (98-04) Assist Fire Services with a community needs assessment of hazardous materials using Chemical Manufacturing Association data in order to provide hazardous analysis planning and emergency response information for public safety employees. (Purchasing & Properties, Fire Services) Means (00-01) Assist with updating the Emergency Operations Manual (All Divisions) Recreational and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space and recreation facilities and services contribute to an enhanced quality of life for citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. Means (99-04) Assist with special community festivals and events working with Parks & Recreation and other City divisions. (Administration, Community Owned Utilities, Economic Development, Information Resources, Management Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) Utilities/Energy Policy End 12.00 City -owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable service to all customers. Focus End 12.01 Customers of the City's electric utility have a range of choices with respect to rates, service levels and power supply options. Means (96-02) Assist with developing and implementing a utility marketing strategy and new rate structure that fully utilizes the Automated Meter Reading System and prepares the City for possible future electric deregulation. (Administration, Utility Office, Community Owned Utilities, Information Resources, Management Services) FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 152 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (98-01) Work with Employee & Organizational Services, Information Resources and Community Owned Utilities with implementation of an integrated financial, human resources and utility Customer Information System (CIS). (Utility Office, Community Owned Utilities, Employee & Organizational Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (98-04) Assist in location, design and construction of a new Municipal Service Center compound, as identified in the citywide ten-year plan, to promote efficient and safe city operations, improve access by citizens, and exemplify urban design standards. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (99-01) Redesign the utility bill to establish a more customer friendly and informative format. (Utility Office) Facilities and services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Means (99-04) Coordinate the adoption and begin implementation of the citywide ten-year facilities plan that contributes to the health of the central business district, promotes efficient and safe city operations, improves access by citizens and exemplifies urban design standards. (Administration, Purchasing & Properties, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (00-01) Assist with completion of new/remodeled Airport Terminal Building. (Purchasing & Properties, Community Services) Means (00-05) Perform security audits and modify City facilities to provide secure working areas for citizens and employees. (Facilities Maintenance, Management Services, Police Services) Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Means (98-04) Continue ongoing recruitment efforts to ensure diversity in the applicant pool and compatibility with core values for every City position. (All Divisions) Means (99-03) Develop and implement individualized career development and citywide succession plans. (All Divisions) Focus End 13.03 The City provides appropriate, well managed information technology and services that support City operations and citizen access to information. Means (98-01) Develop requirements and request proposals, evaluate options and implement an integrated financial, human resources and utility Customer Information System (CIS). (Accounting, Administration, Utility Office, Community Owned Utilities, Management Services) Means (00-05) Provide support for preparing and implementing a comprehensive strategy to address the Geographic Information System (GIS) needs of the City. (Administration, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Development Services, Fire Services, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 153 Finance Policy End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future needs are provided. Means (96-01) Assist with the completion of the Customer Choice & Control (CCC) installation. (Utility Office, Community Owned Services) Means (99-01) Conduct competitive fee analysis for all development and utility related fees andpresent recommended changes to City Council. (All Divisions) Means (99-01) Assist Information Resources in the coordination, implementation, and automation of the code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (All Divisions) Means (99-04) Cooperate and coordinate with the Williamson County Unified Road District to provide an organized transportation roadway system. (Administration, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services) Means (00-01) Review and expand City's debt policy. (Administration) Means (00-05) Pursue additional cooperative purchasing agreements with Williamson County, Georgetown Independent School District and other local governmental entities. (Purchasing & Properties) Means (01-02) Expand the City's long range financial models to include a ten-year financial plan for the General Fund and all utility funds (Accounting, Administration) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, see pages one and two in the City summary section. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 154 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 GEORG��O iro QED This page intentionally left blank. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 1 155 WHAT WE DO: The Accounting Department is responsible for keeping accurate financial records for the City and providing financial and related information to division directors, department heads, and council members when they make financial decisions for the City. The Department pays accounts payable promptly by issuing and mailing checks weekly, processes the City's payroll and related reports, tracks investments and cash flow of all City funds, maintains the general ledger and monitors internal controls, prepares interim and annual financial and budget reports, tracks the City's capital improvements and grant projects, monitors bond proceed disbursements and pays the City's debt service. The Department's goal is to insure and promote fiscal responsibility for City funds and equipment, while providing support to all divisions, so they may better serve the citizens of Georgetown. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Received the Government Finance Officers Association's (GFOA) award for "Excellence in Financial Reporting" for the City's 1998 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the twelfth consecutive year. • Coordinated the Texas Capital Fund economic development grants for the following: • Advanced Cable Services, L.P. • Hewlett Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Buick, Inc. • Texas Electric Cooperatives, Inc. • Presidio in the Rivery • Worked with the Utility Office, Information Resources, Community Owned Utilities and Employee and Organizational Services to develop the system requirements for an integrated financial, human resource, and utility customer information system. 156 • Revised the City's travel policy to further streamline the process and eliminate duplication associated with the City's credit card policy. • Coordinated the financial administration of the $500,000 Texas Parks and Wildlife River Corridors Grant. • Implemented a flexible repurchase agreement as an investment vehicle for the City's 2000 debt issue, which gives the City flexibility in construction timelines. • Implemented investment software to track the City's investments and provide reporting that complies with the Public Funds Investment Act. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2,000/01: • Continue coordination of the City's grant program including development grants, Parks and Recreation grants, Police grants and various other city grants. • Revise accounting reporting systems to incorporate changes mandated by Governmental Accounting Board Statement No. 34. • Work with the Utility Office, Community Owned Utilities (COU), Employee and Organizational Services, and Information Resources to implement an integrated financial, human resource, and utility customer information system. • Work with Finance Administration to expand the City's long range financial models to include a ten- year financial plan for the General Fund and all utility funds. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGETAND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 254,825 Personnel 47,367 51,327 51,327 1) Vendor checks issued 11,677 10,905 11,500 11,250 11,750 2) Invoices processed 42,780 49,864 45,000 51,000 52,500 3) Annual investment portfolio $17,525,141 $30,686,882 $30,000,000 $32,000,000 $30,000,000 4) Number of grants 11 28 17 14 16 Annual grant expenditures $1,228,603 $1,681,735 $3,952,500 $1,280,000 $1,520,000 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGETAND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 00/01 99/00 Adopted 98/99 99/00 Projected (% Change **) Actual Budget Actual 293,244 (15.1%) 5/1 5.75/.5 5.75/.5 # Employees 233,113 264,387 254,825 Personnel 47,367 51,327 51,327 Operations 3,965 3,965 Capital 280,480 319,679 310,117 Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change *) (% Change **) 6.75/.5 6.75/.5 293,244 (15.1%) 293,244 (0.0%) 51,536 (0.4%) 50,036 (-2.9%) (N/A) (N/A) 344,780 (11.2^/0) 343,280 (-0.4%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The payroll processing function has been transferred to Accounting from Human Resources for 2000/01. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 157 WHAT WE DO: The Administration Department provides support to City departments through leading and managing Accounting, Facilities Maintenance, Fleet Management, Municipal Court, Purchasing & Properties and Utility Office. This department plans and directs the City's financial activities: accounting, purchasing, tax collections, billings, financial reporting, and debt and investment management. The department directs the City's budgeting process; the preparation and publication of the Annual Operating Plan Element (budget) of the Georgetown Century Plan; monitors and updates long-term financial plan and prepares related policy recommendations; and plans and coordinates city debt issuances, including presentations to bond rating agencies. Other projects include working with Community Owned Utilities and the Utility Office on the City's utility services and electric deregulation strategies. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Received GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for eleventh consecutive year. • Co-sponsored first Town Hall Meeting to enlist feedback for citizen -focused budget process. • Coordinated $1.45 million certificates of obliga- tion debt issue for traffic improvement projects including realignment of Country Club Road and engineering for the Rivery Bridge. • Coordinated $4.32 million of revenue bonds for the purpose of improvements and expansions to the electric, water and wastewater systems. • Worked with COU and the Utility Office to begin negotiations with AEP Communications (formerly C3 Communications) for operation and maintenance of the fixed wireless network. 158 • Worked with the Utility Office, Information Resources, Community Owned Utilities and Employee and Organizational Services to develop the system requirements for an integrated financial, human resource, and utility customer information system. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Coordinate a citywide financial condition and strategy review and make recommendations to provide adequate resources for the five-year needs of the City. • Analyze development and utility related fees, and make recommended changes to meet costs of residential and commercial/industrial growth. • Develop and implement a regular program and financial summary report process, including reports to Council. • Develop cost of services and rate proposals for City electric utility in coordination with Utility Office and Community Owned Utilities. • Review and expand City debt policy. • Assist COU in establishing an irrigation utility and setting rates. • Prepare citizen -oriented guides on City finances and debt as part of citywide public education initiative. • Work with Accounting to expand the City's long range financial models to include a ten-year financial plan for the General Fund and all utility funds. • Work with COU and the Utility Office to implement a maintenance contract for operation and maintenance of the fixed wireless network. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) a. Number of bond issues outstanding 9 10 12 12 13 b. Amount of debt outstanding $44,805,000 $47,880,000 $54,360,000 $50,395,000 $54,095,000 2) Utility customers 13,546 14,501 15,659 15,585 16,520 3) Adopted annual budget $62,308,314 $68,861,433 $81,757,046 $72,407,286 $85,402,571 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 2/0 2/0 2/0 # Employees 2/0 2/0 109,425 124,477 124,477 Personnel 126,809 (1.9%) 126,809 (0.0%) 185,339 188,030 188,030 Operations 207,294 (10.2%) 161,294 (-22.2°�°) 3,116 Capital (N/A) (N/A) 297,880 312,507 312,507 334,103 (6.9%) 288,103 (-13.8%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 159 ro w 160 WHAT WE DO: The Facilities Maintenance Department provides janitorial service for approximately 123,000 square feet of City buildings (Municipal Building, City Offices, City Hall, Police Station, Public Library, Police Department Annex, Recreation Center, Community Owned Utilities and the Development Services facility) on a regular basis. During 1999/00, janitorial services and landscape maintenance will continue to be contracted out. Light maintenance, painting, landscape maintenance, roofing and air conditioning repairs for City facilities are also provided for those buildings, plus the four Fire Stations, Community Center, Airport Terminal, Madella Hilliard Center, Katy Lake Training Facility and the Recreation Center. This department performs monthly inspections of each facility to identify existing or potential problems and corrects those situations. This department is managed by the Support Services Director and staffed by one full-time Facilities Maintenance Worker. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Performed facility improvements as approved in the Facility Maintenance Internal Service fund including: • Resurfaced three tennis courts. • Replaced one Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) unit at the Community Center. • Painted exterior of the Municipal Building. • Replaced copiers at the Utility Office, Building Inspection, and the Library. • Renovated the first floor of the Municipal Building to relieve overcrowded conditions. • Implemented an annual landscape maintenance contract for the Georgetown Village Public Improvement District (PID). • Upgraded tennis court light electric to bring into code compliance. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Perform facility improvements as approved in the Facility Maintenance Internal Service Fund to include the following: • Replace one HVAC unit at the Community Center. • Complete replacement of carpet and tile at the Municipal Building. • Replace roof at the Tennis Center and Community Center. • Replace treadmill at the Recreation Center. • Develop and implement a new work order management process, that will more closely track time spent per facility for maintenance repairs. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 BUDGETED PROJECTED ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 1) Work orders processed 351 374 2) Facilities maintained 16 16 3) Square footage of facilities 130,000 7 10 maintained 117,500 117,500 4) Service contracts managed 6 7 BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 Actual Budget Actual 482 326 326 18 17 18 130,000 123,000 130,000 7 10 10 2000/001 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected Actual Budget Actual 1/0 1/0 1/0 # Employees 43,494 43,158 42,899 Personnel 11,256 12,610 12,610 Operations 54,750 55,768 55,509 Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change*) (% Change **) 1/0 1/0 43,412 (1.2%) 43,412 (0.0%) 14,006 (u.m.) 14,006 (0.0%) 57,418 (3.40/.) 57,418 (0.0%) 161 INTERNAL SERVICE FUND FACILITIES MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS Major building maintenance expenses as well as janitorial services, copier replacement and landscape maintenance are included in this department. Each maintenance service is assigned an annual lease value, which the leasing department pays into the Internal Service Fund. The annual lease value is determined by the projected replacement cost divided into the years of useful life for each item. These lease payments enable the Internal Service Fund to replace or repair items on a pre -planned schedule. Thus, the City maintains comfortable, safe and aesthetically appealing City facilities. Major projects for 2000/01 include the following: • Replacement of the roof at the Tennis Center and Community Center. • Copier replacement for City Hall, Finance & Administration, Police Department, and Information Resources. • Replacement of one air conditioning unit at the Community Center. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 162 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 63,628 59,202 59,202 Bldgs. Structs. Grds 55,317 (-6.6%) 55,317 (0.0%) 184,892 286,359 286,359 Lease and Contracts 329,518 (15.1%) 329,518 (0.0%) 41,164 40,500 40,500 Bldg. Improvements 99,000 (144.4%) 28,000 (-71.7%) 7,500 7,500 Contingency (Non -R) 7,500 (0.0^�0) 7,500 (0.0%) 59,796 27,300 27,300 Furniture & Fixtures 60,200 (120.5%) 31,800 (47.2%) 349,480 420,861 420,861 551,535 (31.0%) 452,135 (-18.0%) * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 162 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Facilities Maintenance Internal Service Fund. Airport Terminal 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 By Function 26,613 16,813 30,813 18,813 16,813 Copier Replacement 39,200 26,800 29,400 29,400 1,100 Copier Maint. 28,400 28,400 28,400 28,400 28,400 Painting 0 3,200 15,500 19,000 7,000 Roof Replacement 50,000 0 0 0 0 HVAC Replacement 11,000 0 14,000 0 30,000 Pest Extermination 2,516 2,516 2,516 2,516 2,516 Flooring Replacement 35,000 17,300 2,700 3,100 0 Landscape Maintenance 107,200 107,200 107,200 107,200 107,200 Janitorial Svcs. 143,320 143,320 143,320 143,320 143,320 Maintenance Services 61,581 55,685 55,685 55,685 55,685 HVAC Maintenance 33,548 33,548 33,548 33,548 33,548 Elevator Maintenance 2,600 2,600 2,600 2,600 2,600 Emergency Gen. Maint. 8,750 8,750 8,750 8,750 8,750 Racquetball Court Ceiling Tiles 200 200 200 200 200 Gym and Racquetball Floor Maintenance 0 0 0 4,100 0 Table and Chair Replacement 0 0 1,800 0 0 Overhead Door Maintenance 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 Halon/Fire Alarm Maintenance 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 Tennis Court Resurfacing 0 10,500 0 0 0 Dry Deck 0 0 0 0 0 Treadmill Replacement 5,000 5,000 0 0 0 Stairclimber Replacement 0 0 2,400 0 0 Recumbent Bike Replacement 0 0 0 2,400 0 Contingency 7,500 0 0 0 0 Programs & Projects: Animal Services Temp. Office Space 5,700 5,700 0 0 0 Security Cameras for Rec Center 7,500 0 0 0 Total Costs by Function 551,535 453,239 450,539 442,739 422,839 By Facilities Airport Terminal 1,048 1,048 1,048 1,048 2,148 City Hall 26,613 16,813 30,813 18,813 16,813 City Office Building 33,652 23,852 33,652 26,852 23,852 Community Center 42,934 6,934 8,734 6,934 6,934 COU Compound 23,204 31,704 33,004 23,204 25,204 Country Club Median 780 780 780 780 780 Fire Services 41,549 41,549 41,549 57,349 43,549 Katy Lake Training Facility 7,753 9,453 7,753 10,853 7,753 Library 34,661 34,661 42,661 34,661 34,661 Madellia Hilliard 2,600 2,600 7,800 2,600 2,600 Municipal Building 87,514 46,618 36,818 36,818 66,818 Police Dept Annex 9,083 17,583 9,083 9,083 12,083 Park & Ride Facility 3,380 3,380 3,380 3,380 3,380 Police Station 38,381 28,581 38,381 28,581 28,581 Recreation Center 49,887 60,187 47,287 69,187 44,887 Development Services 20,028 20,028 20,028 29,828 20,028 Industrial Building 1,560 1,560 1,560 1,560 1,560 Roadway Medians 8,580 8,580 8,580 8,580 8,580 Landscape Maintenance 48,100 48,100 48,100 48,100 48,100 Tennis Center 49,528 43,528 29,528 24,528 24,528 Contingency 7,500 0 0 0 0 Programs & Projects 13,200 5,700 0 0 0 Total Costs by Facilities 551,535 453,239 450,539 442,739 422,839 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION __ ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 163 0 U 1�1 164 WHAT WE DO: The Vehicle Service Center mission is to provide our customers with a safe and efficient fleet in a professional and friendly environment. The team has an agreement that each member will maintain a positive attitude, be flexible, dependable and trustworthy; be accountable for their actions and hold each other accountable; and demonstrate leadership in ways which contribute to the team's success. The department portion of Fleet Management performs routine maintenance and mechanical repairs on all City equipment and vehicles. The department, with the assistance of computerized records showing maintenance history, performs a scheduled inspection of all City vehicles to ensure safe and efficient operation of vehicles and to prevent and minimize future repair needs. All vehicles needing repairs are brought to the Vehicle Service Center for inspection and either repaired in-house or referred to outside shops for specialized service. The supervisor serves as the division's representative to the City safety committee. The department also has two Automotive Service of Excellence (ASE) certified Master in Automobile and Medium/Heavy Truck technicians, one mechanic is ASE certified in Automobile Brakes, and one mechanic is ASE certified in Automobile Suspension & Steering, in addition to Medium/Heavy Truck Diesel Engines, Electrical/Electronic systems, and Brakes. The department also manages the Fleet Internal Service Fund, writes specifications for new vehicle and equipment purchases, and performs new product research. The department reports to the Support Services Director. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Implemented Vehicle Maintenance software. • Participated in Leadership development training. • Outsourced the preventative maintenance on cars and pickups to help with workload. • Installed equipment in 12 new vehicles and outfitted 11 police cars. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2,000/01: • Replace and/or equip 17 new vehicles. • Develop new procedures and methods to handle increased workload without additional staffing. • Replace equipment approved in the Fleet Internal Service fund schedule to include the following: Fuel dispenser Pressure washer "car wash" • Tire changer FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL. BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Number of City -owned vehicles and equipment 244 243 243 239 258 2) Mechanic to vehicle ratio* 1-81 1-81 1-81 1-80 1-86 3) Mechanic to Maintenance Repair Units (MRU)** 1-143 4) Number of work orders per year 2,698 5) Quantity of fuel used per year 3,184 (gallons) 3,498 a) Unleaded gasoline 100,320 b) Diesel fuel 28508 * Industry average = 1 - 35 4/0 ** Industry average =1 - 90 163,948 177,148 177,148 Personnel 1-156 1-156 1-156 1-160 2,698 3,184 3,396 3,498 95,759 113,722 104,006 107,126 32,084 30,160 40,302 41,511 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 4/0 4/0 4/0 # Employees 4/0 4/0 163,948 177,148 177,148 Personnel 185,164 (4.5%) 185,164 (0.0%) 203,025 219,198 218,781 Operations 235,212 (7.5%) 235,212 (0.0%) 366,973 396,346 395,929 420,376 (6.2%) 420,376 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 165 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT & INSURANCE The purchases of vehicle replacements, vehicle specific equipment and 800 MHZ communication equipment for all City departments are accounted for in this department. All major equipment and vehicles used in providing services to citizens of Georgetown, are purchased from the Fleet Management Fund. Each vehicle and piece of equipment are assigned an annual lease value, which the leasing department pays into the Internal Service Fund. The lease payments made by the departments enable the Internal Service Fund to schedule equipment and vehicle replacements. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: VEHICLES / EQUIPMENT PURCHASED/RETAINED DEPARTMENT VEHICLE TYPE QUANTITY Electric 2000 Utility Trailer 1 additional Pump Maintenance 2000 Mower 1 replacement W/WW Treatment Facilities 2000 Tractor 1 replacement Fire Prevention 2000 1/2 Ton Pickup 1 replacement Parks & Recreation 2000 1/2 Pickup 1 replacement Parks & Recreation 2000 1 Ton Pickup 1 replacement Parks & Recreation 2000 Van 1 additional Parks & Recreation 2000 Mower 1 replacement Parks & Recreation 2000 Sand Pro 1 replacement Parks & Recreation 2000 Top Dresser 1 additional Parks & Recreation 2000 Utility Vehicle 1 additional Parks & Recreation 1992 Sand Pro 1 retained Police Patrol Services 2000 4 Door Sedan 7 replacement Police Patrol Services 2000 4 Door Sedan 4 additional Total 23 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 166 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: VEHICLES / EQUIPMENT REQUESTED FOR PURCHASE/RETAINAGE DEPARTMENT VEHICLE TYPE QUANTITY Electric 20013/4 Ton Pickup Electric 2001 Boom Truck Pump Maintenance 2001 Mower Water Distribution 20013/4 Ton Pickup Street 2001 1 Ton Pickup CVB 2001 Van Animal Services 20013/4 Ton Pickup Inspection 2001 Jeep Fleet Maintenance Fuel Dispener Fleet Maintenance Pressure Washer Fleet Maintenance Tire Changer Park & Recreation 2001 Sand Pro Park & Recreation 2001 Tractor Police Special Operation 20014 Door Sedan Police Patrol Services 20014 Door Sedan 2 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 1 replacement 3 replacement 2 replacement Total 19 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 167 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 168 00/01 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected Actual Budget Actual 63,098 71,220 71,220 Insurance 3,087 10,000 10,000 Insurance Ded 61,164 57,630 57,630 Contracts & Leases 673,196 500,696 500,218 Capital Outlay 800,545 639,546 639,068 * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 168 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change *) (% Change **) 71,830 (o.9°io) 71,830 (o.o%) 10,000 (0.0^io) 10,000 (0.0%) 62,000 (7.6%) 62,000 (0.0%) 545,895 (9.1%) 602,765 (10.4%) 689,725 (7.9%) 746,595 (9.29/6) FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Fleet Management Internal Service Fund FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 169 00101 01102 02/03 03104 04105 Capital Replacement Community Owned Utilities Replacement Cost 241,500 312,600 273,552 203,650 213,500 Number of Units 6 9 8 9 4 Community Services Replacement Cost 42,500 10,000 49,000 0 35,000 Number of Units 2 1 2 0 2 Development Services Replacement Cost 21,000 0 0 0 39,500 Number of Units 1 0 0 0 2 Finance & Administration Replacement Cost 13,000 23,000 27,500 14,500 3,700 Number of Units 3 3 3 1 1 Fire Services Replacement Cost 17,500 0 18,500 52,500 280,000 Number of Units 1 0 1 2 1 Management Resources Replacement Cost 0 0 0 17,500 0 Number of Units 0 0 0 1 0 Information Resources Replacement Cost 0 0 0 14,500 0 Number of Units 0 0 0 1 0 Parks & Recreation Replacement Cost 34,100 15,000 63,600 50,000 15,000 Number of Units 2 1 4 3 1 Police Services Replacement Cost 136,000 184,000 138,000 138,000 69,000 Number of Units 6 8 6 6 3 W & WW Treatment Facilities Replacement Cost 0 0 0 0 0 Number ofUnfts 0 0 0 0 0 Equipment (City-wide) 35,295 58,165 46,140 66,720 31,830 Total Replacement Costs 540,895 602,765 616,292 557,370 687,530 Number of Units Replaced 21 22 24 23 14 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 169 170 WHAT WE DO: The Municipal Court handles the judicial processing of Class C misdemeanors that originate from traffic citations, citizen complaints, code violations, and misdemeanor arrests. In addition to the judicial processing, the Court prepares dockets, schedules trials, processes juries, records and collects fine payments, and issues warrants for Violation of Promise to Appear and Failure to Appear. Municipal Court also processes code violations as part of the citywide code enforcement effort. The Municipal Judge holds monthly arraignment dockets and trials. Two Deputy Court Clerks perform administrative and clerical activities. The department reports to the Court Clerk. The Court is directed by the Court Team, which was empowered by the City Manager to make decisions within established guidelines. This cross divisional team is made up of individuals who either impact or are affected by Municipal Court. Team members include the Municipal Court Judge, City Prosecutor, Assistant City Attorney, Community Services Administrative Assistant, Court Clerk, Deputy Court Clerks, Lieutenant of Patrol Services, Police Information Management Director, Police Records Team Leader and Controller. The Team's accomplishments include the following: • improving the warrant process; • enhancing the flow of communication between Police and Court; • converting the Court caseload management system; • implementing the Texas Department of Public Safety's collection program; and • improving the teen court process through an automatic tracking system. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00 • Improved collections on fines through implementation of a collection service program for warrants. • Increased revenues by updating the current fine schedule to reflect standard fines in this area. • Implemented internet payment option for court fines. • Participated in the Texas Municipal Court Clerks Certification program. • Decreased processing time between issuance of the citation and the court date for the defendant by separating juvenile dockets and arraignment dockets. • Automated the Judge's processes through the purchase of a laptop computer from the court technology fee revenue. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Work with Municipal Court Judge and Prosecutor to create and implement a Municipal Court Policy and Procedures manual. • Fully automate the court process by utilizing technology to update cases during court sessions. 0 Upgrade Municipal Court software to continue to manage the growth in caseloads. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTT= INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00 01 2,660 Capital 1) Number of cases filed 4,887 4,742 5,720 5,105 5,510 2) Number of courtesy letters 4,264 3,784 4,840 5,300 5,725 3) Number of warrants issued 847 984 950 1,025 1,055 4) Municipal Court fine revenue: Retained by City $214,078 $237,163 $236,500 $280,000 $305,000 Remitted to State 108,585 113,465 143,000 160,000 173,000 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change **) 2/0 2.5/0 2.5/0 # Employees 91,337 120,738 119,823 Personnel 39,674 35,302 35,302 Operations 2,660 Capital 133,671 156,040 155,125 159,669 (2.90/.) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change*) (% Change **) 2.5/0 2.5/0 122,346 (2.1%) 122,346 (0.0%) 37,323 (5.7%) 37,323 (0.0%) (N/A) (N/A) 159,669 (2.90/.) 159,669 (o.o%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: In 1999/00, a half-time deputy court clerk was added to handle increased caseload. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 171 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 REVENUES: Court Technology Fee 0 5,000 4,000 10,000 10,000 Court Security Fee 0 0 0 10,000 10,000 Total Revenues 0 5,000 4,000 20,000 20,000 EXPENSES: Court Equipment 0 5,000 4,000 10,000 10,000 Court Security 10,000 10,000 Total Expenses 0 5,000 4,000 20,000 20,000 Ending Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 172 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 FAv'4 Col ooz-e000"" GEOR �D This page intentionally left blank. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 173 �7 174 WHAT WE DO: The Purchasing & Properties Department procures all supplies, equipment, and services for all departments within the City organization. Procurement activities include establishing annual contract and blanket purchase orders to reduce cost; preparing bid specification and tabulations; conducting bid proceedings; expediting materials; and preparing recommendations to the City Council for purchases over $15,000. The department regularly meets with using departments to review purchasing procedures and solicit ideas for improved efficiency. This department also manages facility construction or remodeling and coordinates the purchases and installations for the 800 MHZ radio communications system. The Support Services Director serves as a member of the County -wide 800 MHZ radio system communications cooperative, which oversees the operations of the 800 MHZ radio system. Purchasing also oversees all communication systems currently in use by the City, including pagers, telephones and cellular telephones. Purchasing & Properties oversees the operation of the City's central receiving/distribution warehouses. The warehouses stock and deliver various janitorial, office, automotive, and utility supplies. Fixed asset inventory control is another function of the Department. Inventory control involves identifying and tagging all items to be added to the inventory and the disposal of surplus or salvage property. This department consists of a buyer, purchasing assistant, warehouse specialist, and electric warehouse clerk who report to the Purchasing Agent. The Support Services Director directs this department. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Managed the construction of Fire Station No. 4. • Secured additional office space for Animal Services. • Hired electric warehouse clerk and set up electric warehouse. • Completed renovations of Community Owned Utilities administrative offices to provide additional and more efficient office space. • Installed emergency generator at Recreation Center for backup power for its function as the emergency shelter and the Emergency Operation Center. • Coordinated a citywide facility review with the City Manager's Office and City Council, and implemented a renovation, expansion and replacement process to include Public Library, Animal Shelter, Community Owned Utilities compound, City Hall and Public Safety facility. • Participated in identification and modification of all equipment and systems to assure year 2000 compliance. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Complete the construction of Fire Station No -4 • Expand cooperative purchasing agreements with Williamson County, the City of Round Rock and Georgetown Independent School District, for items such as office supplies and cellular phones. • Finalize and begin implementation of a ten-year facility plan for the renovation, expansion and replacement of Public Library, Animal Shelter, Community Owned Utilities Compound, City administrative offices and public safety facility. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 99100 FY 00/0 1 1) Purchase orders entered 9,305 8,914 10,500 8,600 8,700 2) Inventory items disbursed by requisition 15,018 13,090 15,500 13,780 14,000 . _ 3) Inventory deliveries received 1,596 1,511 1,700 1,740 1,750 4) Formal bids processed 49 35 45 43 45 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change **) 510.5 610 6/0 # Employees 194,658 230,020 224,257 Personnel 89,122 91,974 90,974 Operations 283,780 321,994 315,231 340,592 (8.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change *) (% Change **) 6/0 6/0 234,522 (4.6%) 234,522 (0.0%) 106,070 (16.6%) 106,070 (0.0%) 340,592 (8.0%) 340,592 (0.0%) 175 176 WHAT WE DO: The primary goal of the Utility Office is to maintain and increase the number of satisfied utility customers within Georgetown. The Utility Office Team, consisting of both office and field personnel, accomplishes this by providing innovative, friendly services and accurate, timely information. The Utility Office bills and collects for City utility services, as well as handling requests for utility service connects, disconnects, and transfers; bad debt and non-payment issues; customer assistance with conservation and utility programs; payment options and arrangements; and billing questions. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Assisted Community Owned Utilities (COU) in implementing the water section of the Automated Meter Reading Program, with 90% of the water meters being read automatically. • Contracted with a new credit card merchant services vendor, allowing the City to update equipment and services city-wide, and reduce credit card fees, paid by the City, by 29%. • Automated the Credit Card Draft Program. • Developed and implemented a new utility disconnection policy in order that non-payment fees are more fairly assessed to customers and more accurately reflect the cost of the process. • Worked with COU and a private consulting agency to present a series of workshops / town hall meetings to the public, providing information on the electric industry deregulation and restructuring. • Worked with COU, Accounting, Employee and Organizational Resources, and Information Resources, to develop the system requirements for an integrated financial, human resources, and utility customer information system. • Implemented an in-house bad debt collection program, which has increased annual bad debt collection by 16%. • Worked with COU to begin negotiations with AEP Communications (formerly C3 Communi- cations) for operation and maintenance of the fixed wireless network. • Participated on state-wide Electric Restructuring Committee, responsible for developing and recommending policies and procedures for the operation of the electric industry in a deregulated market. • Participated in the creation and implementation of a City Public Information Team. • Implemented a record maintenance program for the Utility Office that utilizes a Compact Disc (CD) Read/Writer to store Utility Office records on CD, saving scarce and costly record storage space. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Work with Community Owned Utilities to revise water and electric rates that will reflect the new marketing strategy and utilize the Automated Meter Reading system. • Work with the Information Resources, Community Owned Utilities (COU), Employee and Organizational Services, and Accounting to implement an integrated financial, human resource, and utility customer information system. • Outsource the bill print portion of the utility billing process, saving the Utility Office about 5 hours a week in printing, sorting, and mailing. This will also facilitate an easy and cost effective transition to an 8 % x 11 billing format, allowing the City to provide a more informative and detailed utility bill to customers. • Work with COU to implement a maintenance agreement for operation and maintenance of the fixed wireless network. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) Work orders processed 2) Payments processed 3) Ambassador packets delivered 4) Families helped by the Good Neighbor Fund ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 Projected 14,903 15,868 15,472 16,660 17,400 146,880 168,192 169,223 170,600 178,135 480 1170 1,560 1,285 1,300 259 207 220 210 235 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 177 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 9/0 9/0 9/0 # Employees 9/0 9/0 305,928 326,409 314,983 Personnel 319,250 (1.a%) 319,250 (0.0%) 199,461 218,508 218,508 Operations 204,274 (-6.5^/0) 204,274 (0.0%) 6,701 Capital (N/A) (N/A) 512,090 544,917 533,491 Subtotal - Department 523,524 (-1.9%) 523,524 (o.o^/o) 64,428 39,750 39,750 Bad Debt 39,100 (4.6%) 39,100 (o.o^/o) 576,518 584,667 573,241 562,624 (-1.9%) 562,624 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 177 o GEORAd G� ENDED � This page intentionally left blank. FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION 178 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Fire ,Services Fire Services Administration .Page 186 FIRE SERVICES The Fire Services Division is comprised of the Administration, Operations, and Prevention and Community Analysis Departments. These three departments have an interdependent working relationship to accomplish specific objectives. The broad goal of the division is to protect life and property, and provide for efficient customer service. This is accomplished by the ability of a team organization to deliver a variety of services to the public. Internal programs and procedures are designed to support activities and standards necessary to ensure quality service, legal compliance, and fiscal accountability. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Fire Administration 293,187 Fire Prev. & Com. Analysis 218,008 Fire Operations 1,878,437 TOTAL 2,389,632 FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 336,616 238,476 1,968,844 328,489 234,506 1,950,483 380,741 233,183 2,379,843 380,741 233,183 2,379,248 2,543,936 2,513,478 2,993,767 2,993,172 179 FIRE SERVICES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 43 Fire Operations 51 Total Employees Total Budget $2,993,767 Administration 4 Fire Prev. & Com. Analysis Personnel, Operations, & Capital :apital FIRE SERVICES 180 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDS & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens, of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Means (98-03) Support and assist in the development of theRivery Tract and the entertainment district. (Fire Prevention and Community Analysis, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance and Administration, Management Services, Parks and Recreation.) Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. Means (99-04) Sponsor the Red Poppy Festival to help promote the unique character of Georgetown, especially its downtown historical district. (All Divisions) Growth and. Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. Means (98-03) Assist in location, design and construction of City facilities, identified in the city ten-year plan, to ensure that those contribute to the health of the central business district, promotes efficient and safe City operations, improves access by citizens and exemplifies urban design standards. (All Departments, Animal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Economic Development, Finance & Administration, Management Services) Means (99-04) Coordinate a Geographical Information System (GIS) task force to improve the City's property addressing policies and procedures. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance and Administration, Information Resources, Police Services) Means (00-05) Develop and implement an integrated addresses database, allowing access and security by all city divisions, therefore reducing duplication of city resources. (All Departments, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Community Owned Utilities, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) Health & Human Services Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-04) Promote all Georgetown children through public fire education Risk Watch safety programs, and attend neighborhood block parties that strengthen youth and families, community partnerships, and neighborhood activities. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) Means (00-01) Conduct a City wide analysis of in-kind and cash contributions for social services. (All Divisions) FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 181 Means (00-01) Update Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)/First aid instructor training and materials to include Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training. (Fire Operations, Management Services, Parks and Recreations, Police) Public Informatiion and Education Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (99-01) Participate in the City public information and awareness team. (All Divisions) Means (00-01) Increase the number of Town Hall meetings to provide for structured and public citizen input and feedback regarding municipal operations and issues. (All Divisions) Public safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Mean (97-01) Complete the design, bidding, and construction of Fire Station No. 4. (All Departments, Finance and Administration) Means (97-02) Develop and implement community-based fire protection programs that offer citizens and public safety personnel opportunities to solve community problems, identify service needs, and consistently strive to develop and maintain positive relationships. (All Departments) Means (98-04) Conduct a community needs assessment of hazardous materials using Chemical Manufacturing Association data in order to provide hazardous analysis planning and emergency response information for public safety employees. (Fire Operations and Fire Prevention & Community Analysis) Means (99-02) Develop and implement integrative guidelines to provide more effective operations using the National Accreditation Standard, National Fire Protection Association, Texas Commission on Fire Protection, Texas Department of Health, and Insurance Services Office. (All Departments) Means (99-04) Implement and promote the "Risk Watch" Program into the school system in partnership with Police Services, Williamson County Emergency Medical Services and Georgetown Independent School District. (All Departments) Mean (00-01) Update the Emergency Operations Manual. (All Divisions) Focus End 8.01 The response times and service levels for emergency services are compatible in all parts of the City. Means (97-01) Develop and teach an incident command system in partnership with Police Services and Community Owned Utilities to be utilized in managing critical incidents (Fire Administration and Fire Operations) FIRE SERVICES 182 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 _ Means (98-04) Assist in locating a future new site for Fire Station No. 1 as identified in the citywide 10 year plan, to ensure that this facility contributes to the safety of the central business district, provide for the efficient balance of fire protection to the citizens, and exemplify the urban design standards. (All Departments, Finance & Administration) Means (99-04) Investigate the creation of fire districts within the downtown historic district to guide and enhance building codes, zoning, and protection of the historic district. (Fire Prevention & Community Analysis, Development Services, Economic Development, Management Services) Means (99-04) Conduct a comprehensive community analysis of the Insurance Services Office standards to determine community requirements for reduced insurance ratings. (All Departments) Means (00-01) Fully develop the Public Safety Software System capability by improving performance optimization on Public Safety System servers. (All Departments, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) Transportation Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Means (97-02) Identify, jointly with Police Services, Fire Services, and Development Services, traffic flows and emergency vehicle access to reduce accidents and improve traffic movement. (Fire Prevention and Community Analysis, Development Services, Police Services) Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown s citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (98-02) Work with Legal Services, Building Standards Commission, and Community Owned Utilities for the enforcement of nuisance codes and ordinances for the removal of substandard structures. (Fire Prevention & Community Analysis) Means (99-01) Revise the code enforcement process to implement a one-stop calling point and provide more aggressive identification and abatement of violations. (Fire Administration, Fire Prevention & Community Analysis, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Legal Services, Police Services) Means (99-01) Coordinate the implementation and automation of code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of _ violations. (All Departments, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (99-03) Develop policies and programs which implement the Urban Design Plan, including property maintenance, Subdivision Regulations, and Zoning Ordinance update, including a sunset review of these ordinances. (Fire Prevention and Community Analysis, Development Services, Management Services) FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 183 Facilities and services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies.. Means (98-03) Support and assist in the development of theRivery Tract and the entertainment district. (Fire Prevention and Community Analysis, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance and Administration, Management Services, Parks and Recreation.) Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Means (98-04) Target recruiting efforts to ensure diversity in the applicant pool and compatibility with core values for every City position. (All Divisions) Means (99-02) Develop and implement individualized career development and citywide succession plans. (All Divisions) Finance Policy End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business- like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current acid future needs are provided. Means (99-01) Conduct competitive fee analysis for all development and utility related fees andpresent recommended changes to City Council. (All Divisions) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. FIRE SERVICES 184 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 C,EORG��O \1NU This page intentionally left blank. FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 185 WHAT WE DO: The Administration Department ensures that quality service is provided to the community by directing and supporting all departments in the Fire Services Division. Direction is provided through an emphasis on open communication and participation from all levels in the decision making process, which ensures proper planning, coordination and oversight of division activities. Support provided to all departments includes: customer relations, reception, administrative tasks, records management, automated development and maintenance of data, project management, payroll documentation, budgeting, permit processing, and tracking of statistical information on service needs and trends. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Implemented and trained employees on a division file and records system. • Worked jointly with the City of Georgetown Main Street Manager to increase internal and external customer understanding on the Special Event Permit process. • Developed an internal project management process for individual and team initiatives to achieve cost effective results. • Produced a section for the quarterly City Newsletter to educate citizens on risk and fire safety tips, calendar of events, service trends, and public safety information. • Developed an organizational marketing and community information presentation for staff to use when conducting a Fire Services program in the community. • Developed a mutual aid response plan with the City of Round Rock to provide timely responses in physically divided north and south bound Interstate Highway 35 corridor. • Opened temporary quarters for Fire Station No. 4. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Complete the process of revising and analyzing internal Standard Operating Guidelines. • Develop an automatic alarm response plan with the City of Round Rock. • Develop a plan for utilizing insurance billing of specific incidents such as Hazmat and EMS to recover expenses. • Evaluate, prioritize and establish the value and need of all monthly reporting information. • Open and fully implement Fire Station No. 4 by December 2000. FIRE SERVICES 186 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTIVITY INDICATORS 1) Administrative support requests completed 2) Public Presentations 3) Divisional service data records and reports 4) Processed Special Event Permits ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00 01 Adopted Projected Base 525 600 650 650 900 25 30 30 30 30 2,000 2,200 2,300 2,300 2,500 78 80 80 80 100 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 187 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change*) (% Change**) 4/0 4/0 4/0 # Employees 4/0 4/0 156,524 172,551 167,674 Personnel 198,128 (18.2%) 198,128 (o.o%) 134,921 164,065 160,815 Operations 182,613 (13.6%) 182,613 (o.o%) 1,742 0 0 Capital 0 0 293,187 336,616 328,489 380,741 (15.9%) 380,741 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 187 WHAT WE DO: The Operations Department provides emergency services to the community. The department is currently staffed with three shift Captains, twelve station Lieutenants and Apparatus operators, nine career firefighters, ten Auxiliary, and seven Volunteer Firefighters. The service delivery role has expanded with a variety of emergency services, including: fire suppression, medical first response, and specialized rescues. Proactive safety programs provided are neighborhood block parties, pre- il 'dent analysis of commercial and public buildings, community education and hydrant testing and maintenance that meet the requirements of the Insurance Service Office rating system. Hazardous material responses are provided in conjunction with the Williamson County Hazmat Response Team. The Operations Department also provides for training, professional development, safety, and communications. Firefighters are informed of the latest health and safety issues and receive mandated training by the Texas Department of Health, Texas Commission on Fire Protection, and the Environmental Protection Agency. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Staffed a temporary facility for Fire Station No. 4, including recruiting career and auxiliary firefighters. • Reorganized and recruited auxiliary firefighters for relief staffing. • Developed and implemented a hydrant testing program to comply with the new Insurance Services Office rating. • Integrated automatic defibrillator into the First Responder program in order to meet state requirements. 188 • Organized a local "Fill the Boot" campaign for Muscular Dystrophy Association. • Evaluated Fire Operations emergency response plans and integrated modified effective station staffing with apparatus responses. • Participated in the creation and implementation of a City public information and awareness team. W HA:T W E PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH 1N 2000/0 1: • Develop a commercial / industrial business fire protection service plan. • Develop an integrated public fire education program between Operations and Prevention. • Participate in public awareness demonstration at all local applicable functions. • Develop a fire hose testing procedure and record management program that meets National Fire Protection Association requirements. • Develop a fire pump testing procedure and record management program that meets National Fire Protection Association and Insurance Services Office requirements. • Evaluate a fee schedule for services provided by Fire Operations such as false alarms, EMS, and Haz-mat calls. • Open and fully implement Fire Station No. 4 by December 2000. • Promote an Assistant Chief to be in charge ofFire Operations. FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Alarm responses 2,633 2,600 2,600 2,600 2,690 2) Fire Hydrant Inspections 500 1,000 1,000 1,100 1,100 3) Hours of Professional * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed Development & Continuing Education Provided 370 390 600 950 1,540 4) Number of Pre -Incident Analysis Plans Performed 1 10 25 30 30 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change*) (% Change") 33/0 34.5/0 34.5/0 # Employees 43/0 43/0 1,457,110 1,616,350 1,616,349 Personnel 1,941,855 (20.1%) 1,959,620 (0.9%) 296,421 334,134 334,134 Operations 417,228 (24.9%) 419,628 (0.6%) 124,906 18,360 0 Capital 20,760 (N/A) 0 (-100.0%) 1,878,437 1,968,844 1,950,483 2,379,843 (22.0%) 2,379,248 (-0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Six additional firefighter positions will be added, along with an Assistant Chief for Operations, to alleviate staffing issues. FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 189 0 WHAT WE DO: The Fire Prevention and Community Analysis Department seeks to prevent the incidence of hostile fires and other emergencies that pose a threat to the lives and property of Georgetown residents. The department uses fire inspections, safety reviews of new construction, public fire education programs, fire code interpretation and enforcement, and investigating fire cause and criminal arson to diminish fire hazards. The department also serves as the single point of contact for internal and external nuisance and code violation complaints and coordinates the resolution of abatements city-wide. The department provides critical analytical data concerning community growth patterns and fire service logistics involving public safety facility locations, fire station design and construction, traffic flows, emergency vehicle access, response times, and infrastructure needs and requirements. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Implemented the Risk Watch program in Georgetown schools. • Prepared impact analysis and action plans for Insurance Services Office rating system to improve business and homeowner insurance rates. • Adopted procedures for handling juvenile fire setters as developed by the State Fire Marshal's Office. • Promoted and educated customers on services and code enforcement violations by advertising alternative methods of abatement. • Assisted with the 911 Addressing Team to create and implement a new addressing policy for Georgetown and its extra -territorial jurisdiction (ETJ). • Participated in the evaluation of needs for the Downtown Business, Historic, and Fire Districts. 190 • Assisted with the Code Enforcement Task Force, which revised the code enforcement process and created and implemented a one-stop calling point in order to provide a more aggressive means of identification and correction of violations. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Expand the "Risk Watch" public education program to include all elementary campuses in Georgetown public school system. • Establish a Public Fire Education System designed to provide hazard prevention and safety consciousness (of high school senior and above students), to be called "Life Safety 101". • Develop a fee schedule for services performed by Fire Prevention for Inspection services. • Participate in the Review and Adoption procedures of a 2000 Fire Code. • Improve information and unification of all code enforcement agencies and concerns by the installation of integrated files and software systems. • Establish Ordinances for the fire protection of the Downtown Business, Historic and Fire Districts. • Develop an integrated public fire education program between Operations and Prevention. FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 01/02 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 233,183 (-0.6%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's 1) Fire and Code Enforcement inspections completed 1,500 1,650 1,600 1,800 2,561 2) Fire education presentations 50 60 75 100 209 3) Investigations initiated 60 80 80 80 80 4) Abandoned vehicle abatements processed 60 100 100 100 120 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change**) 3/1 3/1 3/1 # Employees 177,974 187,565 183,595 Personnel 40,034 50,911 50,911 Operations 218,008 238,476 234,506 233,183 (-0.6%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change*) (% Change**) 3/1 3/1 179,413 (-23%) 179,413 (o.o%) 53,770 (5.6%) 53,770 (o.o%) 233,183 (-0.6%) 233,183 (0.0%) This page intentionally left blank. 192 FIRE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Information resources Informad an Resources INFORMATION RESOURCES The Division of Information Resources provides information and technology management services in support of all City divisions. The division includes: 1) Information Resources Administration; and 2) Information Resources functional services that include Network Administration, Technology Training, Web Site Management, Computer and Peripheral Replacement and Maintenance, and Systems Administration. The division also manages the Information Services Internal Services Fund and the Mapping Fund. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: INFORMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 193 99/00 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 98/99 Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Information Resources Operation 427,647 520,696 520,696 577,827 577,827 IR Capital Replacement 428,757 452,611 452,611 545,132 484,199 Mapping Fund 2,465 10,000 10,000 13,367 3,500 TOTAL 858,869 983,307 983,307 1,136,326 1,065,526 INFORMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 193 INFORMATION RESOURCES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 1 Network j 1 Admin Asst 8 Total Employees 1 Webmaster Support lic Safety Syst Admin Personnel, Operations, & Capital Personnel Total Budget $1,136,326 INFORMATION RESOURCES 194 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDS & MEANS Growth and Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. Means (00-01) Conduct a City-wide analysis of in-kind and cash contributions for social services. (All Divisions) Means (00-05) Develop and implement an integrated address database, allowing access and security by all city divisions, therefore, reducing duplication of city resources. (Information Resources, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Fire Services, Police Services) Public Information and Education Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens. Means (00-01) Provide citizens with web access to the Code Enforcement Issue Tracking software. (Information Resources) Means (00-01) Participate in the City's public information and awareness team. (Information Resources, Community Services, Finance and Administration, Fire Services, Police Services) Means (00-01) Conduct a City-wide analysis of in-kind and cash contributions for social services. (All Divisions) Means (00-05) Maintain the City's web site to provide information to the citizens of Georgetown. (Information Resources) Public S afety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Means (99-05) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the expansion of the "A Safe Place" Program to provide for the safety of youth by providing educational programs in area schools. (Information Resources, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Parks and Recreation) Means (00-01) Fully develop the Public Safety Software System capability by improving performance ` optimization on Public Safety System servers. (Information Resources, Fire Services, Police Services) INFORMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 195 Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (99-01) Coordinate the implementation and automation of code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (All Divisions) Utilities and Energy Policy End 12.00 City owned sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Means (00-02) Support Community Owned Utilities and Finaice and Administration in the implementation of new utility billing and customer information system software. (Information Resources, Community Owned Utilities, Finance & Administration) Facilities and Services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Focus End 13.03 The City provides appropriate, well managed information technology and services that support City operations and citizen access to information. Means (98-01) Implement an integrated financial, human resources and utility Customer Information System (CIS). (Information Resources, Finance & Administration, Management Services) Means (99-04) Connect all City facilities to the wide area network. This will include Fire Station 4 and Airport. (Information Resources, Community Services, Fire Services) Means (00-01) Improve the operation and efficiency of the City's computer network by installing new firewall software. (Information Resources) Means (00-05) Improve inter- and intra -division workflow by developing new Lotus Notes applications and expanding the City's intranet. (Information Resources) Means (00-01) Conduct a City-wide wide competitive fee analysis. (All Divisions) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. INFORMATION RESOURCES 196 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 GEORG��o v1YDED This page intentionally left blank. INFORMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 197 WHAT WE DO: This division is responsible for the planning, purchase, operation, support, and maintenance of information technology products and services. This includes application system development, acquisition, and implementation; installation and support of desktop computers and peripherals; administration of servers and communications infrastructure; administration of the City's web -site and professional management of electronic and paper information. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Streamlined and standardized the installation of hardware and software by using improved features of the Novell NetWare operating system. • Implemented remote management of desktop computers to improve the speed and accuracy of resolution to help desk calls. • Worked with Community Owned Utilities (COU), Accounting, and Management Services to develop the system requirements for an integrated financial, human resources, and utility customer information system. • Developed a software testing and evaluation laboratory to assist in software selection and upgrade projects. • Connected the Animal Shelter to the City's wide area network. • Completed the conversion from WordPerfect and Lotus 123 to Microsoft Office Applications, including Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. • Coordinated a Geographic Information System (GIS) Task Force to improve the City's street addressing policy & procedures. • Developed and enhanced Lotus Notes databases including Help Desk call tracking, Citywide Software Training, and the City's intranet to 198 improve the sharing of information and streamline workflow between all City divisions. • Completed Year 2000 testing to ensure City systems were prepared to handle the century date change. • Improved the operation and efficiency of the City's computer network by installing new backup hardware, monitoring software and contracting for an independent network audit. • Worked with Finance and Administration to implement an automated travel authorization process using Lotus Notes. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Work with the Utility Office, Community Owned Utilities (COU), Management Services, and Accounting to implement an integrated financial, human resource, and utility customer information system. • Connect Fire Station 4 and the Airport Terminal to the City's wide area network. • Implement citizen complaint tracking and code enforcement software. • Upgrade the City's firewall software and hardware to provide improved security of all computer hardware, software and electronic files. • Continue development of the City's intranet and workflow automation applications using Lotus Notes. • Continue implementation of automated workstation management tools using Novell. • Expand in-house technology training offerings for the City's standard software applications. INFORMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00 01 1) Help desk calls 1,898 2,012 2,500 2,600 2,800 2) Number of networked City 577,827 (11.o%) 577,827 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual sites 7 18 20 21 23 3) Number of computer users 160 260 270 310 320 4) Number of hits to the City Web site (annual total) N/A 332,221 N/A 1,497,184 3,250,000 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 5.75/0.5 7/0 7/0 # Employees 8/0 8/0 263,114 369,582 369,582 Personnel 435,643 (17.9°/6) 435,643 (0.0%) 164,533 151,114 151,114 Operations 142,184 (-5.9%) 142,184 (0.0%) 427,647 520,696 520,696 577,827 (11.o%) 577,827 (0.0%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The proposed budget includes the beginning or continuation of several long-term system implementation projects including the Geographic Information System and the Financial/Human Resources/Customer Information System. The number of hits on the City's web site increased by 400% from January 1999 to January 2000. INFORMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 199 INFORMATION SERVICES CAPITAL REPLACEMENT The purchase and support of computers and peripherals, end-user training, major business applications, and the network system are included in this department. Costs are assessed on a per capita or per component basis, and charged back to the user division over the life of the equipment. Equipment is then purchased on a coordinated, centralized, pre -planned basis, which minimizes cost of purchase, maintenance, and training. During 2000/01, the fund will upgrade or replace 77 computers, 27 peripherals, 3 servers and add 8 new computers. Divisions are also charged for the maintenance of production applications and their proportionate use of network resources. CAPITAL REPLACEMENT SUMMARY: INFORMATION RESOURCES 200 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) Personnel 11,649 (N/A) 11,649 (0.0%) 192,890 231,814 231,814 Operating 250,150 (7.9%) 249,050 (-0.4%) 235,867 220,797 220,797 Capital 283,333 (28.3%) 223,500 (-21.1%) 428,757 452;611 452,611 545,132 (20.4%) 484,199 (-11.2%) * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed INFORMATION RESOURCES 200 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Services: Software Technology Training Annual Contracts Desktop Operations Network Operations Contingency Total Services Information Resources Internal service Fund 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 39,100 50,000 10,000 10,000 50,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 40,000 133,550 140,000 140,000 140,000 140,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 7,500 250,150 267,500 227,500 227,500 267,500 Capital Outlays and Projects: 533,640 Replacement Desktop Hardware 143,500 143,500 143,500 New Desktop Hardware 17,500 Replacement Network Hardware 113,247 122,640 85,000 New Network Hardware 9,086 143,500 143,500 90,000 90,000 Total Capital Replacement 283,333 266,140 228,500 233,500 233,500 Total IR Internal Service Fund Number of Computers Replaced 533,483 533,640 456,000 461,000 501,000 77 77 80 85 90 INFORMATION RESOURCES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 201 MAPPING This account receives and holds monies paid to the City as part of the development review and approval process. These funds are intended to help maintain and upgrade the City's overall map program. In 2000/01 this will help fund the addressing policy and procedure portion of the long-term strategy for an integrated Geographic Information System. 99/00 00/01 01102 98/99 99100 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Ending Fund Balance 13,367 Beginning Fund Balance 11,022 11,672 13,367 9,867 0 REVENUES. Operating 3,958 5,000 6,000 3,000 3,000 Interest & Other 852 500 500 500 500 Total Revenues 4,810 5,500 6,500 3,500 3,500 EXPENSES. Information Resources 2,465 10,000 10.000 13.367 3.500 Total Expenses 2,465 10,000 10,000 13,367 3,500 Ending Fund Balance 13,367 7,172 9,867 0 0 INFORMATION RESOURCES 202 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 1 1 1 Management ,services W J Cite Council Page 214 City Manager's Office Page 216 Employee & Organizational Services HR Page 220 Safety Services Page 22.1 Legal Services Page 218 MANAGEMENT SERVICES Management Services consists of the executive and governing functions of the City and includes the City Council, City Manager's Office, City Secretary, Legal Services, and Employee and Organizational Services. The City Council is the legislative body that provides the leadership and vision for the community of Georgetown. The City Manager's Office functions as the central communication link between the Council and the City organization, and manages the day-to-day operations and services of the City. The City Secretary maintains official records, oversees all municipal elections and coordinates the boards and commissions appointment process. The Legal Services Department provides in-house legal services and also acts as the legal advisor to the City Council, boards and commissions. Employee and Organizational Services, through Human Resources and Safety Services, provides employee and organizational support to retain and attract quality employees. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base City Council 85,651 92,607 87,607 345,730 331,730 Legal Services 347,731 411,587 411,587 495,586 486,465 City Manager's Office 527,174 624,798 620,047 551,180 551,180 Employee & Organizational Svcs 343,471 406,251 400,565 382,293 382,293 City-wide Services 196,482 313,757 205,760 895,340 1,101,935 Safety Services 267,736 395,951 326,278 369,289 369,289 TOTAL 1,768,245 2,244,951 2,051,844 3,039,418 3,222,892 MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 203 MANAGEMENT SERVICES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 5.75 City I Office 18.75 Total Employees 1 City Council 7 Legal Services mp.& Org. Svcs Safety Services Personnel, Operations, & Capital Personn Total Budget $3,039,418 peralions lal ENT SERVICES 204 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELIEMENT 2000/01 ENDS & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Means (00-05) Implement the adopted recommendations of the Economic Development Task Force. (City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Finance & Administration) Focus End 1.01 Existing undeveloped sites in Georgetown are put to beneficial use. Means (97-01) Provide legal services to release assessments along IH -35 Frontage Road, particularly San Gabriel Village and River Oaks IH -35 Business Park. (Legal Services) Means (98-03) Support and assist in development of the Rivery tract and the entertainment district. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Economic Development, Parks & Recreation) Focus End 1.0601 The downtown is economically viable. Means (99-02) Work with the Main Street Program and other City Departments, Downtown Georgetown Association (DGA) and other merchants to promote and enhance the unique character of the downtown square. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services Economic Development, Information Resources,) Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. Means (99-04) Sponsor the Red Poppy Festival to help promote the unique character of Georgetown especially its downtown historical district. (All Divisions) Environmental and Resource Conservation Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development. Means (97-02) Support voluntary efforts to educate and encourage central Texans to maintain clean air standards through cooperation with the Williamson and Travis County Clean Air Force. (City Council, City Manager's Office) - Focus End 2.01 Sufficient, high-quality water is available to meet the current and future needs of citizens and businesses in Georgetown. Priority is given to: 1) human consumption 2) businesses 3) recreation MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 205 Means (98-02) Develop an irrigation/effluent utility ordinance and reuse policy. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Finance & Administration, Parks & Recreation) Means (99-04) Work with the Brazos River Authority, the Chisholm Trail Special Utility District, the Jonah Special Utility District Lower Colorado River Authority and Senate Bill 1 for regional water supply planning with the emphasis on meeting future supply needs. (City Council, City Manager's Office, _- Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities) Means (99-05) Continue cooperative partnership with Chisholm Trail Special Utility District, including modifying service area boundaries and extending leases for Lake Georgetown property. (Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Parks & Recreation) Means (00-01) Develop a backflow prevention cross -connection program to protect the public water system from possible contaminants. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Community Owned Utilities and Development Services) Means (00-01) Adopt a short and long-term water supply plan. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Community Owned Utilities) Focus End 2.02 Wildlife is conserved. Means (99-04) Investigate mitigation plan alternatives for the proposed listing of the Georgetown Salamander on the endangered species list. (City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services) Growth and. Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced Means (00-05) Assist appropriate divisions in preparing and implementing a comprehensive strategy to address Geographic Information System (GIS) needs of the City. (Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources, Police Services) Health and. Human Services Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-04) Promote youth programs such as the those offered by the Parks & Recreation Department, Safe Place, DARE, the Youth Advisory Board and Teen Court that strengthen youth and families, community partnerships and neighborhood activities. (City Manager's Office, Human Resources, Legal Services, Safety Services, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Fire Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) Means (00-01) Update CPR/First Aid instructor training and materials to include Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training. (Safety Services, Fire Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services) 206 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELI MENT 2000/01 D D D D L L L) L) Means (00-01) Work with all divisions to coordinate a city wide analysis of in-kind cash contributions for social services organizations. (City Manager's Office, Legal Services, All Divisions) Historic Preservation Policy End 5.00 Prehistoric and historic resources arepreserved, protected andpromoted for the benefit of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (98-01) Support private efforts to renovate the Shotgun House. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Development Services) Means (99-04) Provide support and assistance to the Downtown Business District Design Committee for the creation of a downtown business -zoning district. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Development Services, Economic Development) Housing Policy End 6.00 All citizens have access to safe and adequate housing opportunities. Means (98-04) Review, adopt, and implement a Housing Plan Element. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Services, Development Services) Public Informattion and Education Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (00-01) Expand training of advisory boards and commissions. (City Council, Legal Services) Means (00-05) Recruit volunteers through various service organizations and programs for City and community projects and services. (City Manager's Office, Safety Services, Community Services, Development Services, Parks & Recreation, Police Services,) Means (00-05) Coordinate and align efforts of advisory boards and commissions through joint meetings of board and commission chairpersons. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services) Means (00-05) Public Information Officer will work with all divisions to coordinate efforts to distribute information in a timely manner to the general public. (City Manager's Office, All Divisions) Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens. Means (00-01) Create a community education program that teaches citizens the basics of municipal government operations. (City Manager's Office, Legal Services) MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 207 Means (00-01) Increase the number of Town Hall meetings to provide for structured and public citizen input and feedback regarding municipal operations and issues. (City Council, City Manager's Office) Public Safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorde ; natural disasters and emergencies. Focus End 8.02 Public safety services extend sufficiently beyond the City limits to ensure through governmental contracts that citizens in all parts of the City are adequately protected. Means (96-05) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the expansion of the Safe Place Program to provide for the safety of youth. (Human Resources, Safety Services) Means (99-01) Review intergovernmental support of service delivery between the City and Williamson County. (City Manager's Office) Means (99-04) Work with Fire Services to investigate the creation of a fire district within the downtown historic businesses to guide and enhance building codes and zoning. (Legal Services, Development Services, Fire Services) Means (99-04) Provide legal support to Police Services to develop and maintain equitable mutual aid agreements with other public safety agencies in Williamson County. (Legal Services, Police Services) Means (00-01) Review the feasibility of a countywide law enforcement training center. (City Manager's Office, Police Services) Means (00-01) Support and assist all divisions with updating the Emergency Operations Manual. (City Manager's Office, All Divisions) Recreation and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space, recreation facilities and services, and social and cultural activities contribute to an enhanced quality of life for the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 9.02 Georgetown has a City wide open space system. Priority is to be given to: 1) the tributaries of the San Gabriel River (e.g. Smith Branch, Pecan Branch, Berry Creek) 2) preservation of key open space views 3) enhancement of park and recreational facilities 4) promotion of environmental conservation and/or protection 5) providing the City with a "land bank" 6) providing buffering from more intensive uses Means (00-01) Work with Parks, Development Services and Community Owned Utilities to develop criteria and identify possible park sites for future development. (Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Parks & Recreation) 208 ANNUAL OPERATING SERVICES NG PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (00-01) Work with Parks to negotiate agreement with United States Army Corps of Engineers for a future regional park. (Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Parks & Recreation) Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. Means (00-01) Review support agreements and/or leases of parkland with community organizations for recreational programming. (Legal Services, Safety Services, Parks & Recreation) Means (00-05) Work with Georgetown Independent School District on future school sites so parkland can be purchased adjacent to schools. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Parks & Recreation) Transportation Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the City. Means (97-05) Work with Williamson County and Development Services on the construction of the following bridges: • Below the dam at Lake Georgetown • Between State Highway 29 and Williams Drive (including bridge crossings to improve traffic flow west of IH -35) • Spring Valley Road bridge • Inner Loop bridge, between State Highway 29 and F.M. 971. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration) Means (97-05) Work with Williamson County and Development Services on the alignment of the following roadways: • Inner Loop Road, west of Interstate Highway 35 • D.B. Wood Road • Booty's Road • Remaining segments of Inner Loop Road, east of Interstate Highway 35 • County Road 115 (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration) -- Means (98-03) Arrange early coordination with the Texas Department of Transportation to: • Widen Austin Avenue, from 6th Street to Williams Drive, including the two bridges spanning the North and South San Gabriel Rivers • Widen Williams Drive, from Cedar Breaks Road to Del Webb Boulevard • Realign F.M. 1460 to F.M. 2243 at Austin Avenue • Widen 0.75 miles of Leander Road west of Georgetown Independent School District property • Widen Highway 971 east of Business 35 to FM 1105 • Install traffic signal at Austin Avenue and Morrow Street MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 209 • Widen and reverse the direction of entrance/exit ramps on Interstate Highway 35 • Install traffic signal at Inner Loop Road and State Highway 29 • Install traffic signal at Inner Loop Road and FM 1460 (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance and Administration) Means (98-04) Work with the Texas Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration to obtain funding for the extension of State Highway 130. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services) Means (98-04) Work with the Texas Department of Transportation to construct necessary improvements along Interstate Highway 35 and other state highways in the Georgetown area. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services) Means (99-01) Participate with Williamson County to ensure that Georgetown area transportation needs are addressed in the upcoming County bond election. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities) Focus End 10.01 the Georgetown Municipal Airport primarily serves the general aviation needs of the community. Means (00-01) Support the construction of new/remodeled Airport Terminal Building (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Development Services, Information Resources) Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.01 Georgetown's unique character is maintained and enhanced. Means (99-03) Develop policies and programs which implement the Urban Design Plan, including maintenance policies, Subdivision Regulations, the Zoning Ordinance and the Sign Ordinance updates, including a sunset review of these ordinances. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Development Services, Community Services, Fire Services) Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. 4 Means (98-02) Work with Code Enforcement, Fire Services, Building Standards Commission, and Community Owned Utilities for the enforcement of nuisance codes and ordinances for the removal of substandard structures. (Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Fire Services) Means (99-01) Revise the code enforcement process to implement a one-stop calling point and provide more aggressive identification and abatement of violations. (All Divisions) MANAGEMENT SERVICES 210 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Utilities/Energy Policy End 12.00 City owned, sponsored or managed utilities provide safe, adequate and reliable services to all customers. Means (98-01) Assist Finance & Administration and Information Resources with implementation of an integrated financial, human resources and utility customer information system. (Employee & Organizational Services, Finance & Administration, Information Resources) Means (99-01) Work with Community Owned Utilities in establishing a full service utility distribution provider. (City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities) Focus End 12.01 Customers of the City's electric utility have a range of choices with respect to rates, service levels and power supply options. Means (96-05) Work with Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, and Finance & Administration plan for and establish wastewater system facilities in the Serenada subdivision. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration) Means (99-04) Create a telecommunications infrastructure with local franchises and other governmental entities. (City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Information Resources) Means (00-02) Evaluate the potential impact that electric deregulation could have on city services. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Community Owned Utilities) Focus End 12.02 City water and wastewater customers in all certified areas receive services which exceed state and federal standards. Means (97-02) Support the efforts of Community Owned Utilities to expand thewatewater collection system to provide wastewater service opportunities to residents in the Booty's Road and Cedar Breaks/Williams Drive areas (including: Turtle Bend and Oakcrest Subdivisions). (City Council, City Managers; Office, Community Owned Utilities) Focus End 12.03 The City's stormwater drainage system efficiently and effectively protects the health and safety of Georgetown's residents and minimizes the negative effects of standing water and urban runoff. Means (00-05) Maintain an on-going Regional Stormwater Plan consistent with State and Federal guidelines in cooperation with Development Services and Community Owned Utilities. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services) Facilities and Services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Means (99-01) Create a database of City -owned property, identifying unused parcels for potential sale or reuse by the City. (City Manager's Office, Legal Services) MANAGEMENT SERVICES _... ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 211 Means (99-04) Coordinate the adoption and begin the implementation of a citywide ten-year facilities plan that promotes efficient and safe city operations, improves access to city facilities by citizens and exemplifies urban design standards. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Safety Services, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Development Services, Economic Development, Finance & Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources, Police Services) Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Means (98-04) Target recruiting efforts to ensure diversity in the applicant pool and compatibility with core values for every City position. (Employee & Organizational Services, All Divisions) Means (99-02) Prepare request for proposals, solicit bids, and award contract to the provider with the best proposal for brokerage insurance services. (Safety Services, Finance & Administration) Means (99-02) Conduct an audit of human resources processes and use results to improve service delivery and ensure compliance with employment law. (Employee & Organizational Services, All Divisions) Means (99-02) Develop and implement individualized career development and citywide succession plans. (Employee & Organizational Services, All Divisions) Means (99-02) Provide individualized support for team organizational development for the Development Process Team and Community Owned Utilities. (Employee & Organizational Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services) Means (99-03) Develop and implement a telecommuting policy/program to allow eligible employees to work from places other than their job sites. (Employee & Organizational Services, Information Resources) Finance Policy End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future need are provided Means (00-01) Adopt and implement recommendations from the citizens' committee researching additional revenue source options. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Finance & Administration) Means (00-01) adopt a long-term financial business plan for the City. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Finance & Administration) Means (00-01) Conduct a citywide competitive fee analysis. (City Council, City Manager's Office, All Divisions) Governmental Affairs Policy End 15.00 A high level of cooperation and involvement exists among Georgetown's citizens and governmental organizations. MANAGEMENT SERVICES 212 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Focus End 15.01 All citizens actively participate in governmental functions. Means (98-04) Revise single -member election districts to incorporate newly annexed areas and to comply with new census data. (Legal Services) - Means (00-02) Provide legal support for reevaluation of the City's election method and redistricting as a result of the Census 2000. (Legal Services) Means (00-02) Assist Development Services in its analysis of Census 2000 data, as it becomes available. (Legal Services, Development Services) Focus End 15.02 The City develops and coordinates service delivery policies with Williamson County, the Georgetown Independent School District and other organizations that provide services to Georgetown. Means (00-01) Contract with Williamson County for administering all municipal elections. (City Council) Means (00-05) Through comprehensive efforts with Georgetown Independent School District (GISD), assist in utility and traffic flow issues related to the location of new school sites and provide other - utility and conservation solutions as necessary. (City Council, City Manager's Office, Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Parks & Recreation) Focus End 15.03 The City is a strong and visible participant in developing comprehensive solutions to issues of concern on a regional level. Means (00-01) Monitor legislative session and advise City Council and staff on proposed bills affecting City operations. (Legal Services) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 213 WHAT WE DO: The City Council is composed of a Mayor, elected at large, and seven Councilmembers elected from single - member districts. The Mayor presides over City Council meetings, and votes only in the case of a tie. Items to be considered by the Council in their meetings are listed on an agenda which is posted on a bulletin board outside the Council Chambers. The agenda is also available in the public library, on the Infoline, on cable TV, in the newspaper and on the City's website. Georgetown is a Home Rule City, which means that the Council is free to enact legislation, adopt budgets, and determine policies, subject only to the limitations imposed by the Texas Constitution and City Charter. The Council appoints the City Manager who carries out the laws and implements the policies and vision established by the City Council. The Council also appoints the city attorney, the municipal judge and the City Secretary. In addition, the Council appoints citizens to serve on advisory boards, commissions, and committees. The City Secretary maintains official city records, conducts city elections and coordinates the boards and commissions appointment process. The City Council's budget includes funds for the needs of the City Council and the City Secretary. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Approved an agreement with the Georgetown Cultural Citizens' Memorial Association for the renovation and lease of the Shotgun House. • Developed a citywide ten-year facilities plan. • Adopted interim sign and zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations to implement the City's Urban Design Plan. • Provided policy direction on issues such as transportation, water, and electric deregulation. • Sponsored the City's first Red Poppy Festival. • Appointed members to and coordinated the meetings of the Economic Development Task Force. • Worked to secure a regional water supply plan. • Adopted a three-year annexation plan. • Held numerous joint meetings with city advisory boards and other organizations to encourage cooperation and alignment of goals. • Developed a closer working relationship with Georgetown Independent School District on issues of mutual concern, such as site location cooperation, traffic issues, and city fees. • Hosted public workshops for community awareness regarding electric deregulation. • Sponsored a community -wide forum on the laws governing open meetings. • Sponsored Georgetown's first community -wide town hall meeting to solicit citizen input for the upcoming budget. • Researched additional revenue sources to fund park projects, transportation improvements and facilities construction. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Implement recommendations of the citizens' committee researching additional revenue sources. • Work with Williamson County to ensure that the Georgetown area transportation needs are fully addressed in the next county bond election. • Review interim sign ordinance and subdivision regulations as they relate to the Urban Design Plan. • Adopt a long-term financial and business plan for the City. • Adopt the Economic Development Task Force's recommendations. • Adopt a short and long-term water supply plan. • Contract with Williamson County to administer all municipal elections. • Research potential impacts that electric deregulation will have on city services. MANAGEMENT SERVICES 214 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City Secretary/Administrative Assistant to the City Manager position was changed to a City Secretary position exclusively. This position and its expenditures have been moved from the City Manager's budget to the City Council's budget. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 215 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Number of Hours Spent in Council Meetings 117 84.5 N/A 135 150 2) Posted Council Meetings 33 37 N/A 49 50 3) Number of Public Meetings Posted 196 190 185 335 350 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 0 0 0 # Employees 1/0 1/0 16,955 22,607 22,607 Personnel 71,714 (217.2%) 71,714 (o.o%) 68,696 70,000 65,000 Operations 274,016 (321.6%) 260,016 (-5.1%) 85,651 92,607 87,607 345,730 (294.6%) 331,730 (-4.o%) * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City Secretary/Administrative Assistant to the City Manager position was changed to a City Secretary position exclusively. This position and its expenditures have been moved from the City Manager's budget to the City Council's budget. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 215 fil WHAT WE DO: The City Manager's Office includes the City Manager, Assistant City Manager, Assistant to the City Manager, an Administrative Assistant, a receptionist, and mailroom staff. The City Manager, appointed by Council, is the chief administrative and executive officer of the City. Responsibilities of the City Manager include management of all day-to-day city activities. The City Manager acts as the City's representative and liaison to local groups, service organizations and businesses. In addition, the City Manager's Office helps coordinate the quarterly City Letter, the Infoline, Teen Court, the Youth Advisory Board, and the resolution of citizen concerns. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Closed out Texas Capital Fund economic development grants on behalf of Texas Electric Cooperatives, Inc., Advanced Cable Service, Advance Metal Systems, Hewlett Chevrolet, Xycarb and Schunk. • Coordinated meetings with numerous advisory boards, regional planning boards and other agency boards. • Began implementation of the revised sign and zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations in relation to the Urban Design Plan. • Increased public awareness and education of city issues through promotion of the City's website, Infoline, City Newsletter and airing of council meetings on cable television. • Negotiated a funding and lease agreement with the Georgetown Cultural Citizens' Memorial Association for the restoration and lease of the Shotgun House. • Coordinated the Development and adoption of a citywide ten-year facilities plan. 216 • Coordinated the City's first community -wide townhall meeting to seek citizen input into the upcoming budget. • Celebrated the City's first annual Red Poppy Festival. • Researched and evaluated benefits and incentives relating to staff recruitment and retention. • Provided information to Council on revenue sources to fund park projects, transportation improvements and facilities construction. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Study the feasibility of a countywide law enforcement training center. • Develop a long-term financial and business plan for the City. • Implement the adopted recommendations of the Economic Development Task Force. • Conduct a citywide competitive fee analysis and review. • Implement the recommendations of the citizen committee researching additional revenue sources. • Create a community education program to teach citizens the basics of municipal government operations and responsibilities. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 *The citizen feedback measurement started with the last quarter of 1997198 BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 00 FY 00 FY 00 01 750 275 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 1) Number of agenda items Budget Actual processed/reviewed 813 784 2) Number of citizen feedback 406,811 404,923 Personnel forms submitted from the 212,272 209,409 Operations City Letter 63* 150 *The citizen feedback measurement started with the last quarter of 1997198 BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 00 FY 00 FY 00 01 750 275 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 00/01 Adopted (% Change *) 5/0.75 351,578 (-13.2%) 199,602 (4.7%) 0 (N/A) 551,180 (-11.1%) 973 975 75 150 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 5/0.75 351,578 (o.o°io) 199,602 (0.0%) 0 (NSA) 551,180 (o.o%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City Secretary/Administrative Assistant to the City Manager position was changed to a City Secretary position exclusively. This position and its expenditures have been moved from the City Manager's budget to the City Council's budget. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 217 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected Actual Budget Actual 5/0.25 6/0.75 6/0.75 # Employees 327,723 406,811 404,923 Personnel 199,451 212,272 209,409 Operations 5,715 5,715 Capital 527,174 624,798 620,047 Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 00/01 Adopted (% Change *) 5/0.75 351,578 (-13.2%) 199,602 (4.7%) 0 (N/A) 551,180 (-11.1%) 973 975 75 150 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 5/0.75 351,578 (o.o°io) 199,602 (0.0%) 0 (NSA) 551,180 (o.o%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City Secretary/Administrative Assistant to the City Manager position was changed to a City Secretary position exclusively. This position and its expenditures have been moved from the City Manager's budget to the City Council's budget. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 217 WHAT WE Do: • Conducted informational/training seminars on groundwater issues, Public Information and Open The Legal Services Department provides in-house Meetings Act and ethics. legal services for the City Council, staff, boards and commissions and supervises the provision of legal • Participated in town hall meetings on Country services by outside counsel. This department acquires Club Road and annual budget. real property, easements and rights-of-way for utility and transportation capital improvements projects; • Completed first year of project to create City - prepares and/or reviews contracts, development owned property database. agreements, ordinances, pleadings, policies, and �i procedures; provides training to other departments on • Established franchise regulatory process. II' legal issues. The Legal Services Department f� represents the City in litigation matters and before • Secured state permits for Pecan Branch State agencies. This department prosecutes at Wastewater Treatment Plant to allow effluent Municipal Court, supervises Teen Court prosecution reuse at Sun City Texas and Georgetown Country ' and assists in Code Enforcement efforts. Club. The City Attorney issues legal opinions to interpret the City Charter, City Ordinances, policies and WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: procedures and state law. The City Attorney provides annual ethics training for the City Council, Boards • Provide legal support to revise/enact/enforce and Commissions. The City Attorney serves as a key ordinances concerning: commercial and manu- specialist for the Development Process Core Team. facturing zoning designations; traffic; Housing Element of Century Plan and regional stonnwater ` drainage utility. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Establish City policy for responding to public • Renegotiated the Lone Star Gas Franchise. infonnation requests and conduct training for employees. • Provided legal support to more aggressively enforce City ordinances and to revise/enact/ • Provide legal support for reevaluation of City's enforce ordinances concerning: expansion of election method and redistricting as a result of the downtown historic district; alcohol consumption 2000 Census. in parks and recreation areas which cater to youth; Sign Ordinance; Addressing Ordinance; • Revise City Council policies and procedures. Junked Vehicles; Weed Ordinance; Urban Design Amendment to Zoning Ordinance and • Acquire property for Leander Road extension and ji Dangerous Building Ordinance. Country Club Road widening. • Provided legal support for economic • Monitor Legislative Session and advise City staff development projects and major land and Council on proposed bills affecting City development projects including Cimarron Hills, operations. Escalera Ranch, expansion of Sun City Texas and the Rivery. • Established Cimarron Hills Public Improvement District. MANAGEMENT SERVICES 218 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Requests for legal services from City Council and staff 1,459 1,500 1,767 2,100 3,600 2) Public Information requests processed 79 100 95 135 175 3) Pending lawsuits and administrative filings 16 12 18 18 20 4) Percent of informal opinions rendered within one day 95% * 95% 95% 90% 90% * Tracking for performance measure initiated last quarter FY 1997/98. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02, PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 5/0 5/0 5/0 # Employees 7/0 7/0 249,203 267,839 267,839 Personnel 386,419 (44.3%) 393,134 (1.7%) 98,528 143,748 143,748 Operations 104,171 93,331 0 0 0 Capital 4,996 (N/A) 0 (-100.0%) 347,731 411,587 411,587 495,586 (20.4%) 486,465 (-1.8%) _ Employees: full time / part time FTE's " * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual " ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES/OTHER COMMENTS: The City also has a litigation contingency account in the General Government department to be used for outside _ counsel and claims settlement as needed. The department will also add an additional Assistant City Attorney and a Paralegal position to assist with boards and commissions and bring Municipal Court prosecution in-house. MANAGEMENT SERVICES __ ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 219 MANAGEMENT SERVICES 220 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 WHAT WE DO: • Provided coaching and processes to Directors and Department Heads to deal with the current The division, through Administration, Human transition and maintain focus on our direction. Resources, and Safety Services, provides employee & organizational support to attract and retain quality • Began the process to evaluate our compensation, employees. The Director of Employee and benefits and recognition programs to ensure we Organizational Services works with all divisions to remain competitive in our recruitment and retention improve internal processes and continually develop the efforts. City's values -based integrative culture. The division fA also provides services to employees, applicants, City • Piloted a high performance organizational model in departments, and other cities in the areas of Community Owned Utilities and Information � employment, employee benefits, employee relations, Resources and began to work in other divisions with - s diversity, human resource management, training and Directors and Department Heads to follow an integrated approach to services rendered to development, payroll processing, performance Georgetown citizens. appraisal, personnel records, policy interpretations, compensation administration, and employee • Conducted a City-wide Harassment Prevention recognition programs. The Division also administers training to promote a professional and comfortable on-going and annual events such as Customer Service work environment. Committee, Appreciation Day, Values Birthday summer picnic, Benefits Fair, and the employee • Restructured annual benefits open enrollment to survey. better educate employees to help maximize use of o benefits. 10 The Employee & Organizational Services budget funds for city-wide programs such as merit XOincludes increases, employee bonuses, city-wide training, and WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: O p process improvement consultation. • Conduct a Human Resources internal efficiency audit to improve service delivery processes to WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: employees. • Assisted with development of requirements, and • Work with the Utility Office, Community Owned request for proposals and evaluation of options for Utilities (COU), Employee and Organizational i Al an integrated financial, human resources and Services, Accounting, and Information Resources utility customer information system. to implement an integrated financial, human resource, and utility customer information system. • Implemented on-going Leadership Development Training to improve and enhance leadership skills • Restructure our service delivery processes of new employees and integrate them to the Citys utilizing Human Resources internal efficiency culture. audit data and information system software integration to increase our efficiency. • Updated New Employee Orientation to provide basic training and introduce new employees to the City's integrative culture. • Develop a supervisor's manual to help answer questions regarding safety, payroll, staffing, benefits, compensation, and employee relations. • Conducted job analysis to ensure internal equity among City employees and update job evaluation • Continue to evaluate and modify our system, salary pay grade, and range structure. compensation, benefits and recognition programs to ensure we remain competitive in our recruitment and retention efforts. MANAGEMENT SERVICES 220 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 This department has two components, the department and staff operating costs (Employee & Organizational Services) and the city-wide merit salary increase, training and other costs (City -Wide Services). Each component is presented separately for comparison purposes. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: EMPLOYEE & ORGANIZATIONAL SERVICES 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 4.25/0 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Payroll Transactions Issued 8,848 9,204 10,000 9,618 10,'050 2) New Hires and Terminations Processed 234 243 252 255 255 3) Performance Evaluation Average Points 2.48 2.67 2.60 2.7 2.7 4) Turnover rate 16.3% 17.2% 15.% 20. %* 18. %* *Includes Regular Part-time positions This department has two components, the department and staff operating costs (Employee & Organizational Services) and the city-wide merit salary increase, training and other costs (City -Wide Services). Each component is presented separately for comparison purposes. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: EMPLOYEE & ORGANIZATIONAL SERVICES 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 4.25/0 5/0 5/0 # Employees 4/0 4/0 190,461 246,642 245,881 Personnel 223,972 (-8.9%) 223,972 (o.o%) 153,010 159,609 154,684 Operations 158,321 (2.4%) 158,321 (0.0%) 343,471 406,251 400,565 Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 382,293 (46%) 382,293 (0.0%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Payroll processing has been transferred to the Accounting Department for FY 2000/01. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 221 CITY-WIDE SERVICES SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City-wide Services budget includes funds for staff merit based salary increases and other salary adjustments. The distribution of salary increases will be determined and distributed later in the fiscal year to the appropriate departments. Employee raises will be merit based for individual and team performance. Original 1999/00 budget for salary items transferred during the year: Merit Increases $ 373,730 Benefits $ 46,358 MANAGEMENT SERVICES 222 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 75,046 20,000 Merit Increases 452,422 (2162.1%) 531,408 (17.5%) 40,889 45,000 45,000 Bonuses 45,000 (0.0%) 45,000 (o.o%) Salary Adjs 20,000 (N/A) 40,000 (1oo.o%) Implementation Plan 200,000 (N/A) 200,000 (o.o%) 18,343 52,307 47,575 Benefits 89,600 (88.3%) 197,209 (120.1%) 137,250 141,404 93,185 Operations 88,318 (-5.2%) 88,318 (0.0%) 196,482 313,757 205,760 895,340 (335.1%) 1,101,935 (23.1%) * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City-wide Services budget includes funds for staff merit based salary increases and other salary adjustments. The distribution of salary increases will be determined and distributed later in the fiscal year to the appropriate departments. Employee raises will be merit based for individual and team performance. Original 1999/00 budget for salary items transferred during the year: Merit Increases $ 373,730 Benefits $ 46,358 MANAGEMENT SERVICES 222 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 /,4 �51 GEORG��T ,'Z OED This page intentionally left blank. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 223 WHAT WE Do: The efforts of the Safety Services Department, in cooperation with all City employees, have resulted in maintaining one of the lowest insurance premium rates in the state. The Safety Services Department manages the City's Risk Program which includes re -bids and annual renewals of Property and Liability Insurance policies. The department coordinates city-wide loss prevention efforts; processes claims filed against the City, and administers the Workers' Compensation Program including a Modified Duty Program. Safety Services administers the Safety Shoe Program, the City's Fitness for Duty Program, Hazard Communication Program; coordinates the Hepatitis -B and Tetanus Vaccination Program for at -risk employees; and publishes a monthly accident summary. The department promotes City-wide safety awareness through the Safety Committee which actively reviews safety training, facilitates the hands-on driving skills course, conducts accident investigations, reviews safety issues at monthly safety committee meetings and promotes the Safety Incentive Award Program. Safety Services also coordinates state approved defensive driving classes. The Safety Services Department reports to the Director of Employee and Organizational Services. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Included initial safety training during the New Employee Sign-up sessions. • Conducted Fitness for Duty training during formal New Employee Orientation to ensure employees received essential information in a timely manner. • Coordinated installation of security cameras at the Library to enhance security of patrons and staff and to help reduce vandalism. • Provided supervisor safety training to safety committee members to enhance their expertise and to improve accessibility to safety information in each division. 224 • Coordinated flagger instructor training and backhoe training for Community Owned Utilities. • Upgraded fencing at the River Ridge pool to comply with new Texas Department of Health public pool safety regulations. WHAT WE PLAN To ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Establish a regular schedule for safety training requirements to allow for maximum participation while incorporating training into regular job duties. • Coordinate with health professionals to conduct post -offer physical assessment testing to correspond with the unique physical requirements of job specific tasks identified on employees job description. • Update CPR/First aid instructor training and materials. • Develop procedures and conduct hands-on training for light and heavy equipment operations to improve safe operation. • Upgrade fencing at San Gabriel pool to comply with new Texas Department of Health public pool safety regulations. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: In 1997/98 two employees' injuries resulted in more than 60 lost duty days each, affecting 1999/00. The modifier is still considerably lower than average and is expected to go back down in 2000/01. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 225 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Workers'Compensation Injuries 34 23 25 25 25 2) Workers' Compensation Experience Modifier 0.49 0.51 0.45 0.51 0.49 Industry Standard = 1.0 3) Claims filed against the City 25 24 30 30 30 4) Incidents with Lost Work 11 6 9 9 9 Days 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 2/0 2/0 2/0 # Employees 2/0 2/0 83,939 87,699 87,601 Personnel 89,335 (2.o%) 89,335 (o.o%) 34,965 41,752 37,177 Operations 41,479 (11.6%) 41,479 (o.o%) 117,479 136,500 136,500 Insurance 138,475 (1.4%) 138,475 (0.0%) 31,353 130,000 65,000 Insurance Deductible 100,000 (53.8%) 100,000 (0.0%) 267,736 395,951 326,278 369,289 (13.2%) 369,289 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: In 1997/98 two employees' injuries resulted in more than 60 lost duty days each, affecting 1999/00. The modifier is still considerably lower than average and is expected to go back down in 2000/01. MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 225 This page intentionally left blank. 226 MANAGEMENT SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Pares & recreation Parks and Recreation PARKS & RECREATION The Parks & Recreation Division plans, organizes, supervises, and coordinates comprehensive leisure and educational activities for the citizens of Georgetown. The Division provides safe, well-maintained facilities in which to enjoy these activities. The Parks & Recreation Division maintains over 380 acres of park land, twenty three parks, five swimming pools, downtown pocket parks, various City facilities, and three cemeteries. The Division programs include the Recreation Center, adult and youth softball, swim lessons, spring break camp, summer camp, teen camp, kid city, youth basketball, youth soccer, senior programs, adventure recreation and many other special events and programs. The Division maintains and handles the sale of cemetery plots in the International Order of Odd Fellows Cemetery, the rental of the Community Center, and park areas at San Gabriel Park. The Division also maintains and programs the Georgetown Tennis Center, which has eleven tennis courts. The Division provides staff support to the City's nine member Parks and Recreation Board. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Parks 837,624 998,959 984,522 1,120,839 1,120,908 Parks Restricted Fund 109,908 92,580 92,580 181,250 64,388 Recreation 409,829 483,460 454,902 431,669 431,669 Recreation Programs SRF 438,569 636,104 627,883 774,448 746,798 Cemetery 0 58,989 58,989 51,200 51,200 Georgetown Village PID 0 60,000 29,000 29,500 29,500 TOTAL 1,795,930 2,330,092 2,247,876 2,588,906 2,444,463 PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 227 PARKS & RECREATION Employees - Full Time Equivalents 24.25 Recreation 43.75 Total Employees 19.5 Parks Personnel, Operations, & Capital Operation: Total Budget $2,574,072 Capital Personnel PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 228 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDS & MEANs Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding job opportunities. Focus End 1.01 Existing undeveloped sites in Georgetown are put to beneficial use. Means (00-01) Support and assist in the development of the Rivery tract and entertainment district. (Parks, Recreation, Community Owned Utilities, Economic Development, Finance & Administration, Management Services) Environmental and Resource Conservation Policy End 2.00 Georgetown's natural and physical resources are managed so that citizens enjoy the benefits of economic and social development Means (99-04) Assist Community Owned Utilities Division in development of an irrigation/effluent utility ordinance and reuse policy to expand the use of effluent water sources to irrigate City parks, open spaces, and to Georgetown Country Club in exchange for access through Country Club to Spring Valley Road for Hike and Bike Trail in order to reduce removal of water from the Edwards Aquifer. (Parks, Community Owned Utilities, Finance & Administration, Management Services) Health and Human Services Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (00-01) Analyze City wide cash and in-kind contribution for social services. (Parks, Recreation, All Divisions) Means (00-01) Update CPR/First Aid instructor training and materials to include Automated External Defibrillator training. (Parks, Recreation, Management Services) Public Information and Education Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (00-01) Participate in the City public information and awareness team. (Parks, Recreation, All Divisions) PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 229 Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens. Means (00-01) Assist Management Services in preparing for Town Hall Meetings. (Parks, Recreation, All Divisions) Public Safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural -: disasters and emergencies. Means (97-05) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the expansion of "A Safe Place" Program to provide for the safety of youth by providing educational programs in area schools. (Parks, Recreation, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Information Resources, Management Services, Police Services) Means (00-01) Conduct an assessment of hazardous materials using Chemical Manufacturing Association data in order to provide hazardous analysis planning and emergency response information for parks and recreation employees. (Parks, Recreation, Fire Services, Management Services) Means (00-01) Support the update of the Emergency Operations Manual. (Parks, Recreation, All Divisions) Recreation and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space, recreation facilities and services, and social and cultural activities contribute to an enhanced quality of life for the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-01) Work with Finance to review I.O.O.F. cemetery policies and fee structures to establish self- supporting operations. (Parks, Finance & Administration) Means (00-01) Work with Legal Services to review support agreements with community organizations. (Parks, Recreation, Management Services) Means (00-01) Work with Police Services on leadership and teamwork through use of the Ropes Course. (Recreation, Police Services) Means (00-05) Work closely with Convention and Visitors Bureau and Main Street Program on special community festivals. (Parks, Recreation, Economic Development) Means (00-05) Work with Public. Library and Fire Services on coordinating and promoting children's programs. (Recreation, Community Services, Fire Services, Information Resources) Means (00-05) Recruit volunteers through various service organizations and programs for City and community projects and services. (Parks, Recreation, Community Services, Development Services, Management Services, Police Services) PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 230 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Focus End 9.02 Georgetown has a City wide open space system. Priority is to be given to: 1) the tributaries of the San Gabriel River (e.g. Smith Branch, Pecan Branch, Berry Creek) 2) preservation of key open space views 3) enhancement of park and recreational facilities 4) promotion of environmental conservation and/or protection 5) providing the City with a "land bank" 6) providing buffering from more intensive uses Means (99-04) Work with Community Owned Utilities to identify additional park and recreational land as part of the regional stormwater drainage utility implementation. (Parks, Community Owned Utilities) Means (00-01) Work with Legal Services, Community Owned Utilities, and Development Services to establish criteria and identify possible park sites for future development. (Parks, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Management Services) Means (00-01) Work with Legal Services to negotiate an agreement with United States Army Corps of Engineers for a future regional park. (Parks, Recreation, Management Services) Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. Means (00-05) Maintain facility and programming partnerships with community organizations such as Georgetown Independent School District, Georgetown Youth Baseball Association, Georgetown Soccer Association, Pop Warner Football, and Aquadillos. (Recreation) Means (00-05) Work with Georgetown Independent School District on future school sites so parkland can be purchased adjacent to schools. (Parks, Recreation, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Management Services) Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and _ economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (99-01) Assist Information Resources in the coordination, implementation, and automation of the code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (Parks, Recreation, All Divisions) Facilities and Services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 231 Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction. Means (00-05) Continue ongoing recruitment efforts to ensure diversity in the applicant pool and compatibility with core values for every City position. (Parks, Recreation, All Divisions) Means (00-03) Develop and implement individualized career development and city wide succession plans. (Parks, Recreation, All Divisions) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 232 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 GEOIlG��� �o �JL�, This page intentionally left blank. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 233 WHAT WE DO: • Completed new 35 acre park in the Rivery area on The Parks Department improves the quality of life for the west side of Interstate 35 with an 18 hole disc Georgetown citizens by maintaining twenty three golf course, ropes course, nature trail and parks on 380 acres, 4 mile Hike/Bike Trail, three mountain bike trail. cemeteries, athletic complex, five swimming pools, downtown pocket parks, tennis center and other City • Restored Old Georgetown Cemetery at Blue Hole facilities. The Department maintains and schedules Park. the use of the Community Center and special park areas. The Parks Department also helps with special • Contracted the mowing of International Order of events, such as Valentine's Day 5K Run/Walk, Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F) Cemetery. Haunted Hayride at Halloween, 4th of July Celebration, Juneteenth, Viking Fest, Christmas Stroll, • Coordinated with Convention and Visitors Bureau Red Poppy Festival, Arbor Day, Project Graduation, on the.Red Poppy Festival on the square. Williamson County Sheriffs Posse Rodeo, DARE and GREAT Graduation swim parties. The Parks Department removes unsafe trees and also maintains WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: a tree farm for replacement trees. The Urban Forester educates and trains staff and citizens on Oak Wilt, • Work with United States Army Corps of pruning and tree care. Engineers for future parkland. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Received National Gold Medal for Excellence in Parks and Recreation. • Acquired new heated pool at Georgetown Village subdivision. • Implemented tree maintenance and pruning program for parks. • Developed joint school/park playgrounds at Patricia Cooper Elementary and at Annie Purl Elementary. • Completed construction of hike/bike trail along the North Fork of the San Gabriel River Corridor. • Completed Emerald Springs Park and will hold grand opening next year. • Completed construction of the athletic complex with 4 softball fields, roller hockey rink, sand volleyball, horseshoe pits, and playground. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 234 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) Park acres 375 450 450 450 450 2) Park area facility rentals 1,000 1,300 1,650 1,800 2,000 3) Number of trees planted 7* 350 350 400 400 4) Volunteer hours in parks 11,184 11,500 12,000 12,000 12,000 * Tree Grant program discontinued in 1997/98. Replaced with Tree Farm in 1998/99. 357,930 416,581 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 18/1.5 689,712 (0.0%) 426,196 (o.o%) 5,000 (o.o%) 1,120,908 (o.o%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The new athletic complex will be opening thisyear which will add an additional 4 softball fields. This addition will increase maintenance costs. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 235 99/00 00/01 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) 15/1.5 16.5/1.5 16.5/1.5 # Employees 18/1.5 476,844 582,378 567,941 Personnel 689,643 (21.4%) 357,930 416,581 416,581 Operations 426,196 (2.3%) 2,850 0 0 Capital 5,000 (N/A) 837,624 998,959 984,522 1,120,839 (13.8%) Employees: full time / part time FTE's * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 18/1.5 689,712 (0.0%) 426,196 (o.o%) 5,000 (o.o%) 1,120,908 (o.o%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The new athletic complex will be opening thisyear which will add an additional 4 softball fields. This addition will increase maintenance costs. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 235 PARKS AND RESTRICTED PARKS Donations & Dedicated Fees: The fund receives and holds revenue earned from the Sheriffs Posse Rodeo Association activities held on City park land, rental of land to the Georgetown Health Care System, and money paid into the City's park land dedication fees program. Funds are to be used for improvements to City parks or for park facilities and equipment. Forest Service Grant: The Texas Forest Grant will partially fund an Urban Forester to help with tree maintenance and planting, educational programs, and help Georgetown maintain its natural resources. The grant will provide $10,000 with a $10,000 match by the City bringing the total 2000 Texas Forest Service Urban Forestry Public Outreach Grant to $20,000. Funds from this grant are projected to be spent from October 1, 2000, to September 30, 2001. Beginning Fund Balance REVENUES: Dedication Fees Park Fees Interest Grants Transfers In Total Revenues 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 100,283 82,408 101,597 .116,862 0 73,575 62,813 57,188 57,188 57,188 4,500 4,500 5,010 4,500 4,500 6,199 2,700 2,700 2,700 2,700 15,038 10,000 10,000 0 0 26,910 34,580 32,947 0 0 126,222 114,593 107,845 64,388 64,388 EXPENSES: Parks & Recreation 109,908 92,580 92,580 181,250 64,388 Transfers Out - Capital Fund 15,000 0 0 0 0 Total Expenses 124,908 92,580 92,580 181,250 64,388 Ending Fund Balance 101,597 104,421 116,862 0 0 PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 236 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 CEMETERY SPECIAL REVENUE FUND This fund accounts for revenues and expenses associated with the City's cemeteries. A transfer from the General Fund is used to balance the fund because annual cemetery plot sales do not cover the mowing and maintenance of the lots. These expenses were previously recorded in the Parks department. Total Revenues 0 58,989 99/00 00101 01102 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 0 0 0 7,300 0 REVENUES: 0 0 7,300 0 0 Cemetery plot sales 0 18,500 25,000 18,500 18,500 Interest 0 0 800 800 800 Transfers In from General Fund 0 40,489 40,489 24,600 31,900 Total Revenues 0 58,989 66,289 43,900 51,200 EXPENSES: Parks & Recreation 0 58,989 58,989 51,200 51,200 Total Expenses 0 58,989 58,989 51,200 51,200 Ending Fund Balance 0 0 7,300 0 0 PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 237 GEORGETOWN VILLAGE PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT FUND The fund receives revenue from the additional incremental property tax paid by the Georgetown Village residents and the developer to fund maintenance on upgraded parks facilities within the subdivision. 99/00 00/01 01102 98/99 99100 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 REVENUES: Tax Revenues 0 0 12,000 20,500 20,500 Developer Contributions 0 60,000 17,000 9,000 9,000 Interest 0 0 0 0 0 Other 0 0 0 0 0 Total Revenues 0 60,000 29,000 29,500 29,500 EXPENSES: Parks & Recreation 0 60,000 29,000 29,500 29,500 Total Expenses 0 60,000 29,000 29,500 29,500 Ending Fund Balance 0 0 0 0 0 PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 238 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 GE0.RG��� 1-4y This page intentionally left blank. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 239 WHAT WE DO: The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure and educational opportunities. In addition to these opportunities, the Recreation Department staffs and manages the Recreation Center, Tennis Center, five swimming pools, summer camp, spring break camp, teen camp, sport camps, and leagues like youth and women's soccer, softball, in-line hockey, basketball, girls fast pitch softball, t -ball, and senior programs. The department also programs special activities at the Georgetown Recreation Center, such as aerobics, country and ballroom dancing, martial arts, tumbling, CPR and many other classes. In addition, unique education opportunities for outdoor recreation are offered numerous times during the year for youth and adults as well as in a camp environment. The department programs special events such as a 5K Run/Walk, Haunted Hay Ride, Youth Pool Parties, Triathlon and Easter Egg Hunt. The City's 18,000 square foot Recreation Center features a full-size gymnasium equipped for basketball and two volleyball courts. The Recreation Center also has two racquetball courts, a game room, a children's activity room, a large activity room, a weight room, showers and lockers, a conference room, and Parks and Recreation Administrative Offices. The Recreation Department works closely with Police Services to identify needs as well as coordinate programming and outreach efforts. The Recreation Department also coordinates with Library Services on special youth activities. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Opened and began operation of the Georgetown Tennis Center and Pool. • Programmed and staffed new heated pool at Georgetown Village for the summer. • Expanded Outdoor Education Programs to include not only adventure programs but challenge programs as well. • Offered dances on weekends at the Recreation Center to grade levels 5th through 7th grades. • Worked closely with Georgetown Project to develop weekend youth programs and Eagles at Night. • Hosted Texas Amateur Athletic Federation State Softball and In -Line Hockey tournaments. • Provided developmental asset training for all camp staff. • Finished construction on challenge course and implemented programming for City programs, as well as outside community groups. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOtiIPLISH IN 2000/01: • Increase current sponsorship and support from local business for special events and develop new events which target community involvement. • Replace San Gabriel Pool pumps which will increase efficiency and decrease maintenance. • Increase lifeguard pay to attract and retain qualified lifeguards throughout the summer season. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 240 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED ACTIVITY INDICATORS FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00 01 1) Swimming Pool Usage 33,000 2) Softball Registration 4,200 3) Recreation Center Usage 90,000 4) Outdoor Education and 105,000 236,895 Challenge Course 238,822 Personnel 172,934 Participation N/A * Pools closed 2 days/week due to lifeguard shortage 34,000 40,000 35,000* 40,000 4,300 4,300 4,300 6,000 95,000 100,000 100,000 105,000 600 600 1,000 2,000 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: 00/01 01/02 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected Actual Budget Actual 6/15.5 10/14.25 10.75/14.25 # Employees 236,895 267,380 238,822 Personnel 172,934 216,080 216,080 Operations 409,829 483,460 454,902 Employees: full time/ part time FTEs * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change *) (% Change **) 10/14.25 10/14.25 269,415 (12.8%) 269,415 (0.0%) 162,254 (-24.9%) 162,254 (0.0%) 431,669 (-5.1%) 431,669 (0.0%) The new athletic complex will be opening this year which will add an additional 4 softball fields. This will allow more tournaments to be held and also increase rentals. The City began operating two new pools in 99/00 for a total of five pools. This has created a staffing and programming challenge. The Georgetown Village pool was used by Georgetown Independent School District for High School Swim Teams in the winter months. Georgetown Independent School District pays for the heaters and the gas to heat the pool. The Ropes Course was built with money from the Texas Parks and Wildlife grant. A Challenge Course Coordinator was hired during the 1999/00 budget year to facilitate the ropes course and the challenge area. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 241 RECREATION SPECIAL REVENUE FUND Revenues and expenditures from the City's recreation programs are maintained in a separate fund. The fund tracks individual programs such as softball, basketball, camps, aquatics, aerobics and outdoor education programs such as challenge course usage and participation in rock climbing, backpacking and adventure camps to ensure each is self-sustaining. Any funds remaining at the end of each year will be used for overhead costs and special projects for Parks and Recreation. 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget 80,914 15,414 22,559 Beginning Fund Balance (17,243) 17,138 46,569 79,035 50,000 REVENUES: Program Revenue Tennis Center Revenue Grant Revenue Interest Transfers In Total Revenues EXPENSES: Parks & Recreation Park Improvements 408,033 413,430 406,500 467,700 467,700 3,612 73,243 66,565 79,529 80,914 15,414 22,559 22,559 10,184 10,184 5,322 2,509 7,500 8,000 8,000 70,000 157,225 157,225 180,000 180,000 502,381 668,966 660,349 745,413 746,798 438,569 631,604 623,383 746,948 742,298 0 4,500 4,500 27,500 4,500 Total Expenses 438,569 636,104 627,883 774,448 746,798 FUND BALANCE: 46,569 50,000 79,035 50,000 50,000 LESS: Contingency 0 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 Ending Fund Balance 46,569 0 29,035 0 0 PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 242 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 PARES FACILITIES FIVE-YEAR PLAN In order to maintain and enhance the City's parks, a five year improvement and maintenance plan has been established. These projects will be funded through general fund appropriations, general obligation debt and dedicated parks and recreation revenues. The projects are included in the department's Special Revenue Funds discussed on the proceeding pages, and the General Capital Projects Fund included in the CIP section. No funding source has been identified for these projects. New Community Center/Civic Center 2,000,000 Recreation Center/Indoor Pool 5,000,000 Total 523,000 735,000 1,265,000 780,000 1,630,000 9,355,000 * New development will require additional equipment and staffing. '* Improvements refer to fences, irrigation, parking, signage, landscaping, amenities, plumbing, electrical, and drainage. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 243 Year / Priority Beyond Project Name / Description 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05 5 Years Williams Drive Park / Pool 150,000 Blue Hole Cemetery 10,000 Athletic Complex 175,000 Lyndoch Park 60,000 500,000 Hike/Bike Trail 500,000 1,000,000 Spring Valley Land Purchase 85,000 500,000 TEA -21 Grant 400,000 Joint School/Park 25,000 50,000 Park Signs (10) 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Playground Equip. Replacement 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 Nature Center 500,000 Senior Center 500,000 Pickett Trail 50,000 Lake Georgetown Muni. Park 500,000 East Side Park Development 250,000 Physically Challenged Playground 300,000 Master Plan for Parkland Dedication 50,000 Playground - Georgetown Village 30,000 Restrooms - Old Town Park 75,000 - - Restrooms - Kelley Park 78,000 San Jose Park 25,000 Katy Crossing Park 25,000 Electrical System Upgrades in Parks 30,000 VFW Park 30,000 Edwards Park 10,000 San Gabriel Park 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Additional Parkland Purchases 250,000 100,000 500,000 Land between N & S San Gabriel 120,000 Berry Creek Park Construction 150,000 . Drainage Ditch @ College St. & VFW Park 35,000 San Gabriel Park Springs Rehab 20,000 - River Ridge Pool Repairs 60,000 Tennis Center Pool Repairs 20,000 New Community Center/Civic Center 2,000,000 Recreation Center/Indoor Pool 5,000,000 Total 523,000 735,000 1,265,000 780,000 1,630,000 9,355,000 * New development will require additional equipment and staffing. '* Improvements refer to fences, irrigation, parking, signage, landscaping, amenities, plumbing, electrical, and drainage. PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 243 /GEORG \D DE This page intentionally left blank. YZ PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES 244 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 1 Police ,services J Information Management Page 258 Patrol Services Page 260 Professional Standards Page 262 Special Operations Page 256 POLICE SERVICES The Division of Police Services functions under a policing philosophy that is best described as: Being interactive with the community and obtaining desired results through collaborative problem solving. The budget is developed around a systems approach to managing the Division and reflects an organizational structure comprised of five departments: Organizational and Administrative Services, Information Management, Professional Standards, Patrol Services and Special Operations. DIVISION FINANCIAL SUMMARY: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected Base Organizational & Administrative 393,679 436,131 422,738 460,226 460,226 Restricted Funds 249,597 348,564 310,215 174,564 80,795 Special Operations 762,474 739,543 731,298 709,129 709,129 Information Management 609,960 656,362 635,655 687,756 687,756 Patrol Services 1,459,847 1,540,588 1,535,859 1,817,474 1,817,474 Professional Standards 151,314 228,134 228,134 234,205 234,205 TOTAL 3,626,871 3,949,322 3,863,899 4,083,354 3,989,585 POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 245 POLICE SERVICES Employees - Full Time Equivalents 33 Patrol Services 70 Total Employees OPE Total Budget ",083,35, Personnel & Operations Special irations ormation Mgt nel POLICE SERVICES 246 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ENDs & MEANS Economic Development Policy End 1.00 Citizens of Georgetown experience a stable, self-sustaining economy with expanding -job opportunities. Focus End 1.07 The tourism industry in Georgetown is developed and promoted in a manner that compliments the City's unique character. Means (99-04) Assist with sponsoring the Red Poppy Festival to help promote the unique character of Georgetown, especially its downtown historical district. (All Departments, All Divisions) Growth and. Physical Development Policy End 3.00 Citizens, business owners and organizations enjoy the benefits of well-planned land usage in which conflicting needs are balanced. Means (99-04) Participate on a Geographical Information System task force to improve the City's property addressing policies and procedures. (Information Management, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Fire Services, Information Resources, Utility Office) Means (00-05) Support the development and implementation of an integrated address database, allowing access and security by all city divisions, therefore, reducing duplication of city resources. (Information Management, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Finance & Administration, Fire Services, Information Resources) Health and Human Services Policy End 4.00 City owned, sponsored or managed health and human services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Means (99-04) Promote all Georgetown children through public education, Risk Watch safety programs, and neighborhood block parties that strengthen youth and families, community partnerships, and neighborhood activities. (Administration & Organization, Patrol Services, Special Operations, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Fire Services, Management Services, Parks & Recreation) Means (00-01) Support the updated CPR/First Aid instructor training and materials to include Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training. (All Departments, Fire Services, Management Services, Parks & Recreation) Means (00-01) Conduct a City-wide analysis of in-kind and cash contributions for social services. (Administration & Organization, All Divisions) POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 247 Public Inforination and Education Policy End 7.00 City owned, sponsored or managed public information and education services enhance the quality of life of the citizens of Georgetown. Focus End 7.01 Public education and information services meet the diverse needs and requirements of citizens. Means (99-01) Participate in the City's public information and awareness team. (All Departments, All Divisions) Focus End 7.02 Public information is accessible to all citizens. Means (00-01) Increase the number of Town Hall meetings to provide for structured and public citizen input and feedback regarding municipal operations and issues. (All Departments, All Divisions) Public Safety Policy End 8.00 Citizens of Georgetown feel safe and are well protected from crime and disorder, natural disasters and emergencies. Means (96-05) Assist Community Owned Utilities in the expansion of the "A Safe Place" Program to provide for the safety of the youth by providing educational programs in area schools. (Patrol Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Information Resources, Management Services) Means (98-04) Assist and support Fire Services in conducting a community needs assessment of hazardous materials using Chemical Manufacturing Association data in order to provide hazardous analysis planning and emergency response information for public safety employees. (Administration & Organization, Patrol Services, Professional Standards, Special Operations, Community Owned Utilities, Community Services, Fire Services, Parks & Recreation) Means (99-03) Develop and maintain equitable mutual aid agreements with other public safety agencies in Williamson County. (Administration & Organization, Management Services) Means (99-04) Implement and promote the "Risk Watch" Program into the school system in partnership with Fire Services, Williamson County Emergency Medical Services and Georgetown Independent School District. (Special Operations, Fire Services) Means (00-01) Expand the Division web page to increase public awareness of police related activities and programs. (Administration & Organization, Information Resources) Means (00-01) Develop a Computer Crimes Investigative team in cooperation with Information Management and the Information Resources Division. (Information Management, Patrol Services, Special Operations) POLICE SERVICES 248 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Means (00-01) Conduct coordinated effort to enforce seatbelt, child restraint devices and other traffic violations that are identified as contributing to injuries resulting from traffic accidents. (Patrol Services) Means (00-01) Expand community involvement in Neighborhood Interaction meetings and activities through increased public awareness. (Patrol Services, Special Operations, Management Services) Means (00-01) Coordinate and establish staffing and training requirements in cooperation with Round Rock Police Department, Williamson County Sheriff's Department, Cedar Park Police Department and Taylor Police Department for the implementation of a county -wide training facility. (Administration & Organization, Professional Standards) Means (00-01) Study the feasibility of a county -wide training facility. (Administration & Organization, Professional Standards, Management Services) Means (00-01) Develop and implement automated Internal Affairs complaint process that includes web site accessibility. (Information Management, Professional Standards, Information Resources) Means (00-01) Improve cost effective training by developing and coordinating a training cadre staff. (Administration & Organization, Professional Standards) Means (00-01) Improve divisional communications, issues and activities through the use of Ropes Course, quarterly divisional meetings and a monthly department newsletter. (All Departments, Parks & Recreation) Means (00-01) Fully develop the Public Safety Software System capability by improving performance optimization on Public Safety System servers. (Information Management, Fire Services, Information Resources) Focus End 8.01 The response times and service levels for emergency services are compatible in all parts of the City. Means (00-01) Update the Emergency Operations Manual. (Administration & Organization, All Divisions) Means (97-01) Develop and teach an incident command system in partnership with Fire Services and Community Owned Utilities to be utilized in managing critical incidents. (Administration & Organization, Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services) Focus End 8.05 Public safety services have a high level of citizen and volunteer involvement. Means (00-05) Recruit volunteers through various service organizations and programs for City and community projects and services. (All Departments, Community Services, Development Services, Management Services, Parks & Recreation) Recreational and Cultural Affairs Policy End 9.00 Parks, open space and recreation facilities and services contribute to an enhanced quality of life for citizens of Georgetown. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 249 Focus End 9.03 There are opportunities for citizens to participate in a wide range of recreational activities. Priority is to be given to programs which meet the needs of those who are physically or otherwise challenged. Means (99-04) Coordinate special community festivals and events working with Parks & Recreation and other City divisions. (All Departments, Convention & Visitors Bureau, Main Street Program, Community Owned Utilities, Finance & Administration, Information Resources, Management Services, Parks & Recreation) Transportation Policy End 10.00 Citizens and commercial goods move safely and efficiently throughout all parts of the Cit, Means (97-02) Identify, jointly, with Community Owned Utilities, Fire Services and Development Services, traffic flows and emergency vehicle access to reduce accidents and improve traffic movement. (Patrol Services, Community Owned Utilities, Development Services, Fire Services) Urban Design Policy End 11.00 Georgetown's citizens and businesses enjoy an attractive community with a unique sense of place and a positive, identifiable image, at a cost which is consistent with other City social and economic priorities. Focus End 11.08 The City is well maintained and citizens enjoy a high standard of community urban design. Means (99-01) Assist Information Resources in the coordination, implementation, and automation of the code enforcement complaint tracking system, including web site access, to provide more aggressive identification and correction of violations. (Information Management, All Divisions) Means (99-01) Revise the code enforcement process to implement a one-stop calling point and provide more aggressive identification and abatement of violations. (Information Management, All Divisions) Facilities and Services Policy End 13.00 The City provides for the safety of its citizens and supports the responsive delivery of coordinated services by the City and other public agencies. Means (00-05) Perform security audits and modify City facilities to provide secure working areas for citizens and employees. (Administration & Organization, Patrol Services, Finance & Administration, Management Services) Focus End 13.02 The City has a high level of employee satisfaction and retention. Means (99-03) Develop and implement individualized career development and citywide succession plans. (All Departments, All Divisions) POLICE SERVICES 250 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Finance Policy End 14.00 All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future needs are provided Means (99-01) Assist Finance & Administration with conducting a competitive fee analysis for all development. (Administration & Organization, All Divisions) For an explanation of the Ends & Means, seepages one and two in the City Summary section. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 251 a • Developed mutual aid agreements with Williamson County Public Safety entities and the Austin Police Department. • Recruited and trained volunteers to contribute to the overall quality of service by assisting the department in filling positions such as Data Entry Clerk, Neighborhood Speed Monitor, Receptionist, Warrant Caller, On -Call Dispatch Assistant and Finger Print Technician. 252 • Develop and manage an equipment inventory system. • Revise and rewrite the Emergency Operations Manual. • Assess uniform needs and cost. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 WHAT WE DO: • Established a Public Information Officers network within Williamson County. The Georgetown Police Services Division's philosophy is based on the idea that policing is the • Participated in creating and implementing a City management of information for a result that is of public information and awareness team. value to the individual customer and the public -at - large. Being responsive to the demands of the day • Developed and taught an incident command means focusing primarily on processes (whole pieces system, in partnership with Fire Services and y� of work) rather than tasks, jobs, people or structure. COU, for managing critical incidents. Therefore, to assure quality internal and external results, the Georgetown Police Services Division • Developed monthly newsletter. a% embodies a value -based, principle driven systems approach to managing the organization. • Coordinated services through the century date change from the perspective of Emergency The Department of Organizational and Administrative Management. Services consists of the Director (Chief of Police), an Administrative Lieutenant, Public Information ` Officer, and the Division Administrative Assistant. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: Hours of operation are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. This department provides • Rewrite the Code of Conduct to align with the the integrating influences necessary to keep the integrative culture at the Police Services Division. Information Management, Professional Standards, Special Operations and Patrol Services Departments ` on track and provides the support for managing the • Expand the Division web page to increase public purpose of the organization. awareness of police related activities and programs. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Coordinate and co-author inter -local agreements with Round Rock Police Department, Williamson • Rewrote the Citizen Complaint, Internal Affairs County Sheriff's Department, Cedar Park Police -process to align with the integrative culture at the Department and Taylor Police Department for use Police Services Division. of county -wide training facility. a • Developed mutual aid agreements with Williamson County Public Safety entities and the Austin Police Department. • Recruited and trained volunteers to contribute to the overall quality of service by assisting the department in filling positions such as Data Entry Clerk, Neighborhood Speed Monitor, Receptionist, Warrant Caller, On -Call Dispatch Assistant and Finger Print Technician. 252 • Develop and manage an equipment inventory system. • Revise and rewrite the Emergency Operations Manual. • Assess uniform needs and cost. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED PERFORMANCE MEASURES FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 FY 00 FY 00/01 185,817 239,355 235,962 Personnel 1) Sustained external citizen 186,776 Operations 393,679 436,131 422,738 complaints are less than .5% of * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed police calls for service .00% .05% .05% .05% 0% 2) Cost of police services is less than $150 per capita $115 $130 $130 $143 $145 3) Overtime expenditures are less than 6% of total salaries 7% 5% 5% 6% 6% 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 Adopted (% Change *) 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 4/0 4/0 246,090 (4.3%) 246,090 (o.o%) 214,136 (14.6%) 214,136 (o.o%) 460,226 (8.9%) 460,226 (o.o%) 253 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected Actual Budget Actual 4/0 4/0 4/0 # Employees 185,817 239,355 235,962 Personnel 207,862 196,776 186,776 Operations 393,679 436,131 422,738 Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 00/01 Adopted (% Change *) 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 4/0 4/0 246,090 (4.3%) 246,090 (o.o%) 214,136 (14.6%) 214,136 (o.o%) 460,226 (8.9%) 460,226 (o.o%) 253 POLICE RESTRICTED FUNDS This fund receives and holds seized assets from narcotics and/or organized crime cases and revenue received from other sources. Funds from seized/confiscated/forfeited assets are to be used for narcotics interdiction and enforcement. This fund also receives and disburses U.S. Department of Justice Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant monies, specifically funds under the COPS MORE program. EXPENSES: Police Services Total Expenses 249,597 348,564 310,215 174,564 80,795 249,597 348,564 310,215 174,564 80,795 Ending Fund Balance 24,563 21,766 24,973 0 0 POLICE SERVICES 254 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 25,631 21,046 24,563 24,973 0 REVENUES: Donations 200 1,500 0 0 Grants 173,966 279,630 243,222 133,625 78,255 Interest 974 620 720 440 440 Seizures 3,542 2,100 1,690 2,100 2,100 Transfers In 69,847 65,434 64,993 13,426 Total Revenues 248,529 349,284 310,625 149,591 80,795 EXPENSES: Police Services Total Expenses 249,597 348,564 310,215 174,564 80,795 249,597 348,564 310,215 174,564 80,795 Ending Fund Balance 24,563 21,766 24,973 0 0 POLICE SERVICES 254 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 GEORGE O v�NDED This page intentionally left blank. N POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 255 WHAT WE DO: The Department of Special Operations, in cooperation with the Department of Patrol Services, is responsible for producing the desired policing products or services to the public. The Department is specifically responsible for performing directed activities, problem solving, successfully prosecuting criminal offenders and developing partnerships with the citizenry. Special Operations consists of a Lieutenant, one Sergeant, three general investigators, two narcotics detectives, one juvenile investigator, two G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education And Training) officers, one D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) officer, one Crime Scene Specialist, one Victim Service Coordinator, and fourteen Victim Service volunteers. Regular hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. A detective and crime scene technician are always on standby for after-hours emergencies. The detectives participate jointly with Patrol Services in the Gang Task Force and the Narcotics Interdiction program. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Established a Family Violence task force to address the needs of juvenile victims of family violence. • Reduced the number of re -occurring family violence cases through cooperation with school counselors. • Conducted in-service training to the Georgetown Independent School District on recognizing the signs of family violence in school age victims. • Implemented a narcotic/drug interdiction program in cooperation with Patrol Services. 256 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Reduce the level of narcotic trafficking by removing general investigation assignments from Narcotics Investigators. • Develop, train and coordinate a Missing and Exploited Children protocol. • Develop a Computer Crimes Investigative team in cooperation with Information Management and the Information Resources Division. • Improve and enhance Sex Offender enforcement through development of automated tracking and alerting system. • Improve individual case information storage and retrieval through implementation of case file system software. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected Actual Budget Actual 15/0 14/0 14/0 # Employees 625,289 608,070 599,825 Personnel 137,185 131,473 131,473 Operations 762,474 739,543 731,298 Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 00 FY 00/01 8% 8% 80% 90% 37 30 98% 100% 00/01 01/02 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PERFORMANCE MEASURES FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 00 1) Recidivism rate for runaway 105,309 (-19.9%) 105,309 (o.o%) 709,129 (-3.0%) 709,129 (o.o%) juveniles is less than 10% N/A 18% 5% 2) 80% of all illegal drug and alcohol problems that are identified and verified are successfully resolved 80% 100% 90% 3) Overall index crime rate is less than 37 per 1,000 37 20 29 4) 98% of all arrests pass the first legal review 98% 100% 100% 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 98/99 99/00 Projected Actual Budget Actual 15/0 14/0 14/0 # Employees 625,289 608,070 599,825 Personnel 137,185 131,473 131,473 Operations 762,474 739,543 731,298 Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 00 FY 00/01 8% 8% 80% 90% 37 30 98% 100% 00/01 01/02 Adopted Projected Base (% Change *) (% Change **) 13/0 13/0 603,820 (0.7%) 603,820 (o.o%) 105,309 (-19.9%) 105,309 (o.o%) 709,129 (-3.0%) 709,129 (o.o%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: In June 2000, a Victim Services Coordinator position was added through awarded grant fimding and will be renewed annually. This position was previously a volunteer position. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 257 WHAT WE DO: The Department of Information Management is comprised of the Director of Information Management, Communications Supervisor, thirteen Public Safety Operators, two Records Specialists and a part-time Staff Assistant. The Department of Information + Management oversees the automated systems and processes which supply the information necessary to manage and improve the delivery of police services. • The Communications Section is responsible for answering 911 calls, non -emergency lines, and addressing the needs of the walk-in public after 5:00 p.m. This section dispatches for Police, Fire, and Animal Services personnel on a 24-hour basis, and for Community Owned Utilities and Utility Office after normal business hours, as well as on holidays and weekends. The Communications Section monitors weather warnings that may require an Emergency Operations Plan Alert Phase or Activation. • The Records Section ensures prompt, accurate, confidential records keeping for the public, officers, and other agencies, using a computerized o records keeping system. This Section operation hours are Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. • The Technical Services Section maintains all information systems (computer, telephone, radio, E-911) to ensure reliable 24-hour operations. This Section is responsible for the continual upgrade of personal computers to improve office 0 productivity. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Created and provided Activity Bulletins and Special Reports for the Police Services Division, the media and the public through the Records Section for Crime Analysis Statistics. 258 • Decreased turnover rate in the Communications Center by incorporating flex hour scheduling and advanced training. • Created a Standard Operating Procedure Manual for the Records Section. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Provide improved accessibility to Fuginet (Fugitive Information Network) by increasing the number of authorized computer terminal systems within the Special Operations Department. • Improve staffmg requirements and department effectiveness by conducting job diversification training in Communications and Records. • Establish, train and coordinate an emergency notification system for the community. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED PERFORMANCE MEASURES FY 97/98 FY 98/99 FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00/01 1) 95% of all cases forwarded to 17/0 17/0 17/0 # Employees 17/0 other agencies do not require 535,067 589,472 568,765 Personnel 621,662 (9.3%) 621,662 (o.o%) 74,893 66,890 follow-up requests 95% 95% 99% 99% 99% 2) 95% of all officers and 687,756 (8.2%) 687,756 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time firefighters surveyed are * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed satisfied with communi- cations operations 95% 95% 99% 99% 99% 3) 100% of all police and fire Priority 1 calls for service are dispatched within 40 seconds 100% 100% N/A* 100% 100% 4) 90% of all police and fire Priority 2 calls are dispatched within 2 minutes 90% 90% N/A* 100% 100% * NOTE: Actual numbers are not available due to computer system conversion. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 259 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 17/0 17/0 17/0 # Employees 17/0 17/0 535,067 589,472 568,765 Personnel 621,662 (9.3%) 621,662 (o.o%) 74,893 66,890 66,890 Operations 66,094 (-1.2%) 66,094 (o.o%) 609,960 656,362 635,655 687,756 (8.2%) 687,756 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 259 m v u WHAT WE DO: The Department of Patrol Services produces desired policing products and services to the public. The Department responds effectively and efficiently to emergencies and the public's initial requests for service, develops partnerships with the citizenry and works with Special Operations to resolve identified problems. In partnership with Special Operations, Administrative Services, Patrol Services promotes public safety and crime prevention education with programs and literature. The Department meets the needs of the public by providing patrol services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The command structure of the department is comprised of one Lieutenant, three Sergeants, five Corporals, two school resource officers, twenty-three patrol officers, and a part-time Staff Assistant. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Conducted training with Georgetown Independent School District on contingency plans for response to Critical Incidents at school campuses. • Developed and implemented a program of geographic accountability by neighborhood for each police beat through Neighborhood Interaction meetings. • Reduced the number of accidents citywide through education, engineering, and enforcement as it relates to the top ten accident locations. 260 WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Reduce the level of narcotic trafficking by implementing a narcotic/drug interdiction program in cooperation with Special Operations. • Conduct coordinated effort to enforce seatbelt, child restraint device and other traffic violations that are identified as contributing to traffic accidents and injuries resulting from traffic accidents. • Expand community involvement in Neighborhood Interaction meetings and activities through increased public awareness. • Establish and implement a High -Risk Arrest Team to assist with locating and apprehending subjects with felony arrest warrants. • Provide community members with increased problem -solving skills and knowledge through coordinated training efforts with the Texas Institute of Public Problem Solving. • Consult with Fire Services to evaluate a fee schedule for false alarm calls. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 1,459,847 1,540,588 1,535,859 1,817,474 (18.3%) 1,817,474 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City added two new officers in 1999/00 through a Community Oriented Policing (COPS) grant to be assigned to local schools. A sergeant position was also transferred from Special Operations in FY 1999/00. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 261 ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED PERFORMANCE MEASURES FY 97/98 FY98/99 FY 00 FY 99/00 FY 00/01 1) 90% of all life-threatening (Priority 1) calls for service are responded to within 3 minutes 90% 90% N/A* 90% 94% 2) 90% of all emergency (Priority 2) calls for service are responded to within 5 minutes 90% 90% N/A* 90% 95% 3) 40% of the reporting areas (grids) are absent of crime and disorder 40% 40% N/A* 40% 40% 4) Overall property index crime rate is less than 35 per 1,000 35 35 35 35 27 * The new public safety software system required to track these items was not completed as scheduled. Measures were tracked in 1999/00. 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 99/00 00/01 01/02 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Projected Base Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) (% Change **) 30/0 30/0 30/0 # Employees 33/0 33/0 1,082,660 1,147,815 1,143,086 Personnel 1,346,692 (17.8%) 1,346,692 (o.o%) 350,753 384,704 384,704 Operations 470,782 (22.4%) 470,782 (o.o%) 26,434 8,069 8,069 Capital 0 (N/A) 0 (N/A) 1,459,847 1,540,588 1,535,859 1,817,474 (18.3%) 1,817,474 (o.o%) Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00/01 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The City added two new officers in 1999/00 through a Community Oriented Policing (COPS) grant to be assigned to local schools. A sergeant position was also transferred from Special Operations in FY 1999/00. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 261 WHAT WE DO: The Department of Professional Standards assures quality police services by managing all related actions needed to create, staff, and maintain all other departments. The Department is responsible for personnel recruitment, selection and training, citizen complaints, internal affairs investigations, and service audits. The department also acts as the liaison to the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officers Standards and Education. The Department is comprised of a Lieutenant, a Sergeant, and a Staff Assistant. Hours of operation are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. WHAT WE ACCOMPLISHED IN 1999/00: • Recruited reserve police officers. • Developed and trained a Crisis Negotiation Team to conduct peaceful resolutions prior to requiring the need for a tactical response team. • Improved and expanded the skills and knowledge to respond to high risk situations. • Developed a recruitment team that actively pursues potential applicants in an effort to diversify the workplace. • Established computer based tracking system for employee training requirements and certifications. WHAT WE PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH IN 2000/01: • Coordinate and establish staffing and training requirements in cooperation with Round Rock Police Department, Williamson County Sheriff's Department, Cedar Park Police Department and Taylor Police Department. • Develop and implement automated Internal Affairs commendation and complaint process that includes web site accessibility. 262 • Improve cost effective training by developing and coordinating a training cadre staff. • Improve divisional communications, issues and activities through the use of Ropes Course, quarterly divisional meetings and a monthly department newsletter. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00/01 100% 96% 95% 100% 100% 100% 98% 100% 100% 7 22 11 17% 23%* 17% 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: ACTUAL ACTUAL PERFORMANCE MEASURES FY 97/98 FY 98/99 1) 95% of all Internal Affairs Adopted Actual investigations are completed Actual (% Change *) and successfully reviewed 3/0 3/0 with a final disposition 3/0 72,700 within 40 days N/A 95% 2) 100% of state mandated 79,500 79,500 Operations training is completed in every 2 year cycle N/A 100% 3) 95% of all Internal Affairs investigations are deemed fair and equitable N/A 95% 3a) Number of complaints 39 26 4) Personnel turnover rate for Police Services Division is less than 10% annually N/A 10% *Includes internal promotion. BUDGETED PROJECTED PROPOSED FY 99/00 FY 00 FY 00/01 100% 96% 95% 100% 100% 100% 98% 100% 100% 7 22 11 17% 23%* 17% 2000/01 ADOPTED BUDGET AND 2001/02 PROJECTED BUDGET: 151,314 228,134 228,134 Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00101 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 3/0 151,365 (o.o%) 82,840 (o.o%) 234,205 (2.7%) 234,205 (0.0%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The Training Sergeant position was staffed and began work within the Professional Standards Department. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 263 99/00 00/01 98/99 99/00 Projected Adopted Actual Budget Actual (% Change *) 3/0 3/0 3/0 # Employees 3/0 72,700 148,634 148,634 Personnel 151,365 78,614 79,500 79,500 Operations 82,840 (4.2%) 151,314 228,134 228,134 Employees: full time / part time * Percent change of 00101 Proposed from 99/00 Projected Actual ** Percent change of 01/02 Projected Base from 00/01 Proposed 01/02 Projected Base (% Change **) 3/0 151,365 (o.o%) 82,840 (o.o%) 234,205 (2.7%) 234,205 (0.0%) SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: The Training Sergeant position was staffed and began work within the Professional Standards Department. POLICE SERVICES ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 263 �O� GEORG��O kt NDED � This page intentionally left blank. POLICE SERVICES 264 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 PT(g ec ng J CAPITAL PRojEcTs TABLE of CONTENT'S Projects CapitalImprovements Summary .................................................................................................265 Streets........................................................................................................................................... 266 Electric......................................................................................................................................... 270 StormwaterDrainage................................................................................................................... 274 Wastewater................................................................................................................................... 278 Water........................................................................................................................................... 282 Airport.......................................................................................................................................... 286 GeneralCapital Projects.............................................................................................................. 288 Economic Development Grants 9 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS The City of Georgetown annually updates and adopts a five-year Capital Improvements Project (CIP) Schedule as part of the operating budget adoption process. Needed capital improvements are identified through system models, repair and maintenance records, and growth. The City uses a team approach to prioritizing capital improvement projects, whereby City staff from all operational areas provide input and ideas relating to each project and its effect on operations, such as: Fire and Police Services staff provide insight into a project's impact on emergency traffic responses, public lighting issues and other public safety concerns. Development Services staff give direction regarding new development and the infrastructure needs relating to this growth. Other utility departments, such as the Street Department, Water and Wastewater Departments exchange information regarding each project and coordinated timing of many of the related projects in an effort to create less inconvenience for the citizens affected. By using this team approach, the City develops cooperation among the departments, identifies potential problems areas, and prioritizes financing issues. The Capital Improvements Projects generally consist of infrastructure and related construction and do not include small capital items such as furniture, equipment and vehicles. Significant maintenance projects, such as street overlay are also included in capital projects schedules. These maintenance type projects are not necessarily capitalized as a fixed asset and are always cash funded. The schedules consolidate the capital spending priorities for all operating activities of the City. This includes general government activities, such as street and bridge construction, park development, police, fire and recreation facilities; and enterprise activities, such as electric transmission and distribution facilities, water treatment plants, towers, distribution and transmission facilities, wastewater interception, collection systems, and treatment facilities, stormwater drainage improvements and other requirements to provide services to the citizens. The CIP Schedules are included as part of the annual operating budget. The first year of the list becomes the capital budget for the approved budget year. The following pages outline the CIP Schedule for each activity and include anticipated projects, current year project location and sources of funding. 2000/01 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SUMMARY Airport Capital Improvements 246,000 Economic Development Grants 650,000 Electric Capital Improvements 3,292,900 General Capital Improvements 3,969,993 Stormwater Drainage Capital Improvements 542,212 Street Capital Improvements 3,335,000 Wastewater Capital Improvements 7,930,000 Water Capital Improvements 2,315,730 Total Projects 22,281,835 Issuance Costs for Revenue Debt 56,250 Issuance Costs for General Capital Debt 39,200 Issuance Costs for Street Debt 40,000 TOTAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT COSTS 22,417,285 CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 265 streets Capital Projects - 2000-2001 Overlay 125,000 Seal Coat 50,000 Microsurfacing 340,000 Sidewalks 50,000 Williams Drive Widening Country Club Road Rock Street Extension Hutto Road (Hwy 29 to Quail Valley) Maple Street Extension Rivery Bridge Construction Williams Drive Traffic Islands Rivers Bridge - Approach Main Street (6th to 9th): Construction Austin Avenue Bridge Total Streets Capital Improvements 266 75,000 1,000,000 150,000 150,000 185,000 300,000 10,000 4nn,nnn 400,000 100,000 3,335,000 CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 X AC I P\E X H I BITS\C I P2000-200 1 \ST R E ET2000. DWG Streets Capital Projects Cost to Date 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 Project Name/ Description Overlay Seal Coat Microsurfacing Sidewalks Country Club Road Rock Street Extension Maple Street Extension Rivery Bridge Engineering/Construction Rivery Bridge Approach Hutto Road (Hwy 29 to Quail Valley) Williams Dr Traffic Islands Williams Drive Widening Main Street (6th to 9th): Construction Austin Avenue Bridge Transportation Software / Model Downtown Sidewalk/ Hike & Bike Trail County Road 115 Booty's Crossing to Dam Lake Georgetown Bridge San Gabriel Park Bridge Morrow Street Extension Traffic Light: NW Blvd at Lakeway Inner Loop: ROW Acquisition Railroad Street Airport Road Maple Street to Inner Loop Southwestern Blvd to Inner Loop County Road 188 Bridge Inner Loop West Downtown Streets Repair Shell Road 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 340,000 350,000 370,000 370,000 370,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 450,000 1,000,000 150,000 185,000 300,000 2,100,000 400,000 0 150,000 0 10,000 190,000 75,000 400,000 0 100,000 200,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 150,000 350,000 965,000 1,000,000 500,000 300,000 2,400,000 200,000 80,000 240,000 300,000 100,000 1,200,000 725,000 250,000 1,500,000 200,000 500,000 250,000 538,000 Total Streets Capital Improvements 450,000 3,335,000 5,475,000 3,695,000 3,928,000 3,580,000 Financial Impact: Budgeted improvements consist of maintenance and rehabilitation of the City's roadway system along with .various new construction projects. In general, expansions to the service area will not add significant new operating costs and most projects have only incremental effects on the annual operating budget. => Previously issued general obligation debt will fund the completion of Country Club. Shortfalls in project funding are being presented as "debt funded". Actual debt issuance will be determined based on final scheduling of anticipated projects. => Unscheduled street maintenance ($100,000) and scheduled street repairs ($150,000) have been moved to the Streets Special Revenue Fund as on-going maintenance projects. CAPITAL PROJECTS 268 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Funding Sources: Fiscal Year 00101 01102 02103 03/04 04/05 Projected Annual Project Cost 3,335,000 5,475,000 3,695,000 3,928,000 3,580,000 Sources of Funding: Operating Revenue 954,324 775,000 825,000 875,000 950,000 Service Improvement Fees 300,625 300,625 300,625 300,625 300,625 General Obligation Debt 1,250,000 4,280,000 2,450,000 2,645,000 2,225,000 Interest & Other 830,051 119,375 119,375 107,375 104,375 Combined. 5 Year Estimated. Funding sources ------------ Interest & Other General Obligation Debt Operating Revenue a Improvement Fees CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 269 Electric Capital Projects - 2000/2001 Residential Underground 963,300 Developer Reimbursed Costs (263,600) Line Equipment Upgrades 278,000 GIS/ Database Projects 175,000 System Upgrades 330,000 Pecan Branch Plant Line Extension 50,000 Contract Right of Way Maintenance 131,300 Customer Choice and Control 100,000 Berry Creek Reserve Improvements 175,000 Georgetown Substation Improvements 410,000 Glasscock Substation Improvements 337,500 San Gabriel Substation Improvements 157,600 Williams Drive/Country Club Realignment 20,000 Downtown URD Projects 100,000 Austin Avenue Project 68,800 Stonehaven Conversion 75,000 Airport Road Conversion 150,000 Park and Neighborhood Lighting 35,000 Total Electric Capital Improvements 3,292,900 CAPITAL PROJECTS 270 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 ELEC8 — Conductor Upgrades ELECA — Glasscock 'Fie Line ' ELEC — Main 8t from 0b SL to 9th St. ' ELEC2 — Feeder Roconduotor — ELECJ — Austin Ave. Widening — Switch Installation ELEC4 — Stonehaven Conversion ELEC16 ELEC5 — Reo|noor Replacement 92, ELECG — Feeder Reroutes ` � ELEC7 — Soonlo Dr. Raconduotor ELEC8 — Conductor Upgrades ELECA — Glasscock 'Fie Line ' ELEC10 — Capacitor Additions ELEC11 — Gabriel Radosero [LEC12 — Airport Rd. Conversion ELEC13 — Gabriel Feeder Exits ELEC14 — Switch Installation ELEC15 — Berry Creek Reserve ` ELEC16 — COU Complex Tia Lines ` ELEC17 — System Upgrades ` Q ELEC18 — Katy Crossing School � amsDrive` 1\ELoCTPJo000.mWG ` \ . TO . � � Qf- � ` Aoh| 2000 Electric Capital Projects Cost to Date 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 Project Name / Description Electric Capital Projects Residential Underground Developer Reimbursed Costs Line Equipment Upgrades GIS/ Database Mapping Projects System Upgrades Pecan Branch Plant Line Extension Contract Right of Way Maintenance Customer Choice and Control Berry Creek Reserve Improvements Georgetown Substation Improvements Glasscock Substation Improvements San Gabriel Substation Improvements Chief Brady Substation Improvements Williams Drive/Country Club Realignment Downtown URD Projects Austin Avenue Project Stonehaven Conversion Airport Road Conversion Park and Neighborhood Lighting Line Extentions/Conversions Road Bores for Sun City Feeders Total Electric Capital Improvements 963,300 1,011,500 1,062,100 1,115,200 1,170,900 (263,600) (276,700) (290,500) (296,400) (311,200) 278,000 56,200 634,000 664,600 695,400 175,000 50,000 52,500 55,100 57;900 330,000 367,500 385,900 405,200 425,400 50,000 150,000 131,300 137,800 144,700 152,000 159,600 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 175,000 410,000 326,900 337,500 311,600 500,000 157,600 28,500 20,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 68,800 75,000 150,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,000 804,200 500,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 200,000 0 3,292,900 3,402,500 3,223,700 3,330,700 3,433,000 Financial Impact: Budgeted improvements consist of maintenance of the existing electrical system along with various new construction projects. In general, expansions to the service area will not add significant new operating costs and most projects have only incremental effects on the annual operating budget. => The automated meter reading system (Customer, Choice & Control, or CCC) was fully implemented in 1999/00, and requires on-going maintenance costs of $240,000 in electric operations, as well as, continued funds for system expansion. => Previously issued revenue debt will fund improvements that began in 1999/00. An additional $1,250,000 of new debt will be needed to complete the 2000/01 project funding. 272 CAPITAL PRO.H:C'I'S ANNUAL OP[I:A TING PLAN liLEMI_NT 2000.01 Funding Sources: Fiscal Year 00/01 01102 02/03 03/04 04/05 Projected Annual Project Cost 3,292,900 3,402,500 3,223,700 3,330,700 3,433,000 Sources of Funding: Operating Revenue 1,100,000 1,400,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,600,000 Utility Revenue Debt 2,089,722 1,894,500 1,623,500 1,719,000 1,719,000 Interest & Other 103,178 108,000 100,200 111,700 114,000 Combined. 5 Year Estimated Funding Sources Interest & Other Operating Revem Utility Revenue Debt CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 273 Stormwater Capital Projects - 2000/2001 TxDOT Retaining Wall 255,700 Regional Stormwater 19,512 9th & Elm Street 267,000 Total Stormwater Drainage Projects 542,212 CAPITAL PROJECTS 274 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 `1 / Y . '9s _' _J 2STM - A m -STM STM STATE H_WY. ''29 u � -• . C.I.P. 2000/2001 ap���31 �NNER� STORMWATER DRAINAGE I 1STM - Curb and Gutter E 2STM - Wagon Wheel/Western Trail 3STM - Analysis of Dams and Retaining Wall 4STM - San Gabriel Park Dam/Imhoff Dam/ San Gabriel Park Retaining Wall l 5STM - Railroad Right -of -Way Drainage i' Prepared by Community Owned Utilities - April 2000 -- XACIP\EXHIBITSXCIP2000-2001\D PAI NAGE2000DNIG Stormwater Drainage Capital Projects Cost to Date 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 Project Name / Description TxDOT Retaining Wall 255,700 Drainage Management Model & Plan 90,000 Curb and Gutter 25,000 25,000 25,000 Regional Stormwater 19,512 100,000 100,000 100,000 Wagon Wheel, Western Trail 10,000 Railroad Drainage 92,000 9th & Elm Street 267,000 Pleasant Valley Subdivision 350,000 San Gabriel Park Dam 70,000 Imhoff Dam 70,000 San Gabriel Park Retaining Wall 70,000 Golden Oaks Drainage 200,000 Smith Branch Drainage 115,000 Churchill Farms Drainage 160,000 Forest Street Drainage 75,000 Total Stormwater Drainage Projects o 542,212 0 877,000 475,000 325,000 Financial Impact: In 1997/98, the City began a $2.2 million debt funded Stormwater Drainage improvement program, with related debt service being paid through increases in Stormwater Drainage fees. The final phase is scheduled for completion in 1999/00 when the last of the bond proceeds is expected to be spent. The drainage improvements program was implemented to improve infrastructure in existing parts of town. => Future improvements will require additional debt issues and related increases in Stormwater Drainage fees. CAPITAL PROJECTS 276 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Funding Sources: Fiscal Year 00101 01102 02/03 03104 04/05 Projected Annual Project Cost 542,212 0 877,000 475,000 325,000 Sources of Funding: Operating Revenue/Fund Balance 542,212 0 25,000 25,000 25,000 Unidentified Funding Source 0 0 832,000 440,000 287,000 Interest & Other 0 0 20,000 10,000 13,000 "Debt issuance will require a rate increase to fund debt service Combined. 5 Year Estimated, Funding Sources Unidentified Funding Source CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Operating Revenue/Fund Balance Other 277 Wastewater Capital Projects - 2000/2001 Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant: Phase 2 2,000,000 Pecan Branch - Construction 4,900,000 Oakcrest Rehab Sewer 235,000 Williams Drive Lift Station 120,000 Serenada Wastewater 300,000 Hutto Road Rehabilitation 100,000 Austin Avenue Bridge: TxDOT Widening 20,000 Main St. Reconstruction: 9th to 6th 150,000 Rock Street Wastewater Line Upgrade 5,000 Wastewater Line Upgrades 100,000 Total Wastewater Capital Improvements 7,930,000 CAPITAL PROJECTS 278 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 3 :.i -------_ ��. 8WW M V I -w 2WW J t O - 79 p0 g(PAEN�� STATE HWY. s ! - -4WW J C.I.P. 2000/2001 WASTEWATER 1 WW - Gabriel View Dr. 2WW - Woodland Rd 3WW - Serenada Wastewater System 4WW - Hutto Rd. Rehabilitation v 5WW - Main St, Wastewater Line Project 6WW - Rock St. Wastewater Line Project 7WW - Austin Ave. Bridge (TXDOT Widening) 8WW - Pecan Branch PH 2 Prepared by Community Owned Utilities r April 2000 I P\EX H I BITSICI P2000 -20011W W2000.D WG Wastewater Capital Projects Cost to Date 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 Project Name / Description Pecan Branch Treatment Plant Serenada Wastewater Oakcrest Rehab Sewer Williams Drive Lift Station Hutto Road Rehabilitation Rock Street Wastewater Line Upgrade Wastewater Line Upgrades Pecan Branch Construction Pecan Branch WWTP Phase 2 Austin Ave Bridge: TxDOT Widening Main St Reconstruction: 9th to 6th Water Reuse / Irrigation South Fork: Phase 1 IH 35 Interceptor @ HEB Williams Drive: Phase 4 Pecan Branch Interceptor: Phase 3 Treatment Plant/ Property Purchase Richter Development Dove Springs Rehabilitation System Evaluation Golden Oaks/ Lift Relief Berry Creek Improvements West Street Collector Sun City Effluent Return Line 250,000 100,000 125,000 125,000 460,000 1,170,000 310,000 Total Wastewater Capital Projects 5,300,000 7,930,000 1,699,000 1,110,000 2,220,000 1,937,000 Financial Impact: Budgeted improvements consist of maintenance of the existing wastewater system along with various new construction projects. In general, expansions to the service area will not add significant new operating costs and most projects have only incremental effects on the annual operating budget, except as noted below. => The Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant is scheduled for construction to begin in 2000/01 and to be operational by Spring 2002. Costs for wastewater plant operations will increase approximately 33%, or $205,000 annually. The 2001/02 costs are estimated at $152,605. => Shortfalls in project funding are presented as "debt funded". Actual debt issuance will be determined based on final scheduling of anticipated projects. => Wastewater capital improvements $100,000, Edwards Aquifer Inflow and Infiltration ($50,000) and Utility Trench Repairs ($8,000) have been moved to the Wastewater Collection Department as on-going capital maintenance costs. CAPITAL PROJECTS 280 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 400,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 400,000 235,000 120,000 100,000 5,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 4,900,000 5,000,000 2,000,000 20,000 150,000 585,000 364,000 500,000 800,000 227,000 150,000 250,000 100,000 125,000 125,000 460,000 1,170,000 310,000 Total Wastewater Capital Projects 5,300,000 7,930,000 1,699,000 1,110,000 2,220,000 1,937,000 Financial Impact: Budgeted improvements consist of maintenance of the existing wastewater system along with various new construction projects. In general, expansions to the service area will not add significant new operating costs and most projects have only incremental effects on the annual operating budget, except as noted below. => The Pecan Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant is scheduled for construction to begin in 2000/01 and to be operational by Spring 2002. Costs for wastewater plant operations will increase approximately 33%, or $205,000 annually. The 2001/02 costs are estimated at $152,605. => Shortfalls in project funding are presented as "debt funded". Actual debt issuance will be determined based on final scheduling of anticipated projects. => Wastewater capital improvements $100,000, Edwards Aquifer Inflow and Infiltration ($50,000) and Utility Trench Repairs ($8,000) have been moved to the Wastewater Collection Department as on-going capital maintenance costs. CAPITAL PROJECTS 280 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Funding Sources: 00/01 01/02 02103 03/04 04105 Projected Annual Project Cost 7,930,000 1,699,000 1,110,000 2,220,000 1,937,000 Sources of Funding: Operating Revenue 725,000 452,750 710,750 785,750 850,750 Impact Fees 165,000 165,000 165,000 165,000 165,000 Service Improvement Fees 720,325 965,250 379,250 839,250 425,250 Utility Revenue Debt 854,675 0 0 500,000 573,000 Interest & Other 5,465,000 116,000 138,000 138,000 131,000 Combined. 5 Year Estimated. Funding sources Utility Revenue Debt Service Impro Interest & Other Impact Fees Operating Revenue CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 281 Water Capital Projects - 2000/2001 Rock Street Water Line Upgrade 35,000 Customer Choice and Control 100,000 Leander Road - TRS Line 110,000 Well 9 Rehab 190,000 Austin Avenue - 12th to 17th 250,000 Old Town Rehab 68,730 Leander Elevated Tank 250,000 Water Line Upgrades 100,000 Hutto Road Widening - Line Relocations 100,000 Williams Drive Widening - Line Relocations 40,000 Sequoia Spur Tank 150,000 Southside Booster #1: Rehabilitation 8,000 Turtle Bend 20" Line: West Loop Project 155,000 Main St: Reconstruct 9th to 6th Street 125,000 Austin Avenue Bridge: TxDot Widening 60,000 DB Wood/ Booty's Crossing: W. Loop 424,000 Country Club 16" Water Line 100,000 Plant Modifications: SDWA 1995 50,000 Total Water Capital Improvements 2,315,730 CAPITAL PROJECTS 282 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 a L NS N� 4WA Q° 7WA.-- - 4, ,. 1 = X52 D , 13 A 8WA 9 � ,b 9WA 1, J� m 12WA / z0 ^ r� STATE `HWY.9 u G; C.I.P. 2000/2001 11 WA ' WATER _I 1 WA - Pine St. from El 5th St. to El 8th St. & w WA _ College St. from El 5th St. to Ell 8th St. 2WA - Rehab. Booster Pump at Southside Well Q 3WA - Rock St. Water Main Project / 6WA 4WA - Williams Dr. (TXDOT Widening) 5WA - Hutto Rd. 6WA - Leander Rd. Elevated Storage Tank _! 7WA - Sequoia Spur Water Storage Tank " - 8WA - Turtle Bend 20" Water Line 9WA - D.B. Wood Rd. to Booty's Crossing 1 OWA - Main St. Water Line Reconstruction 11 WA - Austin Ave. Bridge (TXDOT Widening) r 12WA - Country Club 16" Water Line J 13WA - Water Plant Modifications r - 1 Prepared Community Owned Utilities -� April 2000 X:\CI P\EX H I BITS\C I P2000-2001 \WATE R2000. D WG Water Capital Projects Project Name / Description Southside Booster #1: Rehabilitation Customer Choice & Control Water Line Upgrades Williams Drive: TxDOT Widening Hutto Road: TxDOT Widening Rock Street Water Line Upgrade Leander Elevated Tank Sequoia Spur Tank Turtle Bend 20" Line: West Loop Proj Main St: Reconstruct 9th to 6th St Leander Road - TRS Line Well 9 Rehab Austin Avenue - 12th to 17th Old Town Rehab Austin Ave Bridge: TxDOT Widening DB Wood / Booty's Crossing: W Loop Country Club 16" Water Line Katy School Line Plant Modifications: SDWA 1995 Lake Plant Expansion (2 mgd) Sun City Ground Storage/Feeder County Rd 116 to Maple Bootys Crossing/Williams Dr: W Loop Elevated Storage Tank / Sun City Tfr Line to Sequoia Spur Lake Plant Expansion (2 mgd) Total Water Capital Improvements Financial Impact: Cost to Date 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 8,000 8,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 40,000 100,000 35,000 250,000 150,000 155,000 125,000 110,000 190,000 250,000 68,730 60,000 424,000 500,000 100,000 60,000 50,000 50,000 200,000 2,000,000 1,140,000 150,000 550,000 1,000,000 500,000 523,000 1,320,000 250,000 1,320,000 0 2,315,730 1,368,000 1,540,000 5,340,000 2,123,000 Budgeted improvements consist of maintenance of the existing water system along with various new construction projects. In general, expansions to the service area will not add significant new operating costs and most projects have only incremental effects on the annual operating budget. => The automated meter reading system (Customer, Choice&Control, or CCC), which was fully activated in 1999/00, requires on-going maintenance costs of $240,000 annually in water operations in addition to continued funds for system expansion. => Southside microfiltration plant was fully operational in 1999/2000. Operating costs and utilities for the plant are budgeted at $301,367. => Utility Trench Repairs ($8,000) and Water Capital Improvements ($100,000) have been moved to the Water Distribution Department as on-going capital maintenance costs. CAPITAL PROJECTS 284 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Funding Sources: Fiscal Year 99/00 00/01 01102 02/03 03104 Projected Annual Project Cost 2,315,730 1,368,000 1,540,000 5,340,000 2,123,000 Sources of Funding: Operating Revenue 1,434,327 1,100,000 1,100,000 700,000 800,000 Impact Fees 268,125 268,125 268,125 268,125 268,125 Service Improvement Fees 0 0 200,000 1,200,000 775,000 Utility Revenue Debt 0 0 0 2,675,000 0 Conservation Rate Revenue 0 0 0 850,000 0 Interest & Other 102,548 107,875 79,875 160,375 387,875 Combined. 5 Year Estimated, Funding Sources Interest & Other Conserval Reve Utility Revenue Debt Service Improvement Fees CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Operating Revenue 285 286 Airport Capital Projects - 2000-2001 Rehab T -Hangar C Roof 2,500 Repair Hangar D Ramp Terminal Building Parking Lot at Terminal Furniture, Fixtures, & Equipment 1,000 225,000 7,500 10,000 Total Airport Capital Improvements 246,000 CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Airport Capital Improvement Projects Cost to Date 2000101 2001/02 2002103 2003104 2004105 Project Name / Description Rehab T -Hangar C Roof 2,500 FAA Noise Study 25,000 Repair Hangar D Ramp 1,000 Replace AV Gas Dispensers 40,000 Terminal Building 30,000 225,000 (1) Terminal Building - Furniture 10,000 Parking Lot at Terminal 7,500 Resurface Airport Streets 10,000 FAA Control Tower 400,000 Total Capital Improvements 30,000 311,000 10,000 400,000 0 0 (1) Grant funded for $200,000 - City's portion is 50% match plus non eligible construction costs Funding Sources: Fiscal Year 00/01 01102 02103 03104 04105 Projected Annual Project Cost 311,000 10,000 400,000 0 0 Sources of Funding: Operating Revenue 76,991 991 0 0 0 Grant Revenue 200,000 0 0 0 0 Undecided Revenue Source" 0 0 400,000 0 0 Interest & Other 34,009 9,009 0 0 0 "Undecided Revenue Source such as Bonds or Airport cash Reserves. Combined 5 Year Estimated Funding �1 Interest & sources Other Undecided Revenue Source :rating Revenue Revenue Financial Impact: Budgeted improvements consist of expansion and other capital costs at the City's Airport. Operating and maintenance costs associated with expanded facilities are not shown here. _> Previously issued general obligation debt is expected to be used in FY 2000/01 towards the improvement of the Terminal building. Assistance for this project is funded through a Texas Department of Transportation grant. CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 287 General Capital Projects - Facilities and. Parks cost to Date 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 Project Name / Description Police Training Facility 80,000 Facilities Plan (to be determined) 35,000 3,889,993 Total Capital Improvements 35,000 3,969,993 0 0 0 0 Funding Sources: Fiscal Year 00/01 01102 02/03 03/04 04/05 Projected Annual Project Cost 3,969,993 0 0 0 0 Sources of Funding: Operating Revenue 149,993 0 0 0 0 General Obligation Debt - Previously Issued 3,250,000 0 0 0 0 General Obligation Debt - New Issue 490,000 0 0 0 0 Interest & Other 80,000 0 0 0 0 Combined. 5 Year Estimated. Funding sources Previously Issuec Financial Impact: )/her Revenue Budgeted improvements consist of expansion of City facilites, as identified in the facilities plan. Signficant Parks construction projects are included here also, when appropriate. Operating and maintenance costs associated with the development of new facilities are not shown here. => Previously issued general obligation debt is expected to be used in FY 2000/01 towards the purchase of a new facility for the Community Owned Utilities compound. Remodeling costs to fully utilize the facility are also included, and are being presented as "debt funded". Actual debt issuance will be determined based on final scheduling of the improve- ments, when actual costs are known. => Funding sources include general obligation debt issuance for $490,000 for the lighting of the athletic complex, which was approved by Council through a bond reimbursement resolution in FY 1999/2000. CAPITAL PROJECTS 288 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 - Economic Development Grants CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 289 99100 00/01 01/02 98199 99100 Projected Adopted Projected Actual Budget Actual Budget Budget Beginning Fund Balance 74,332 0 85,857 0 0 REVENUES: Business Injections/Other 140,640 0 0 0 0 Grants 1,177,957 740,000 90,000 650,000 0 Total Revenues 1,318,597 740,000 90,000 650,000 0 EXPENDITURES. Facilities: Advanced Cable - TCF Grant 423,731 0 0 0 0 Advanced Cable - Business Contribution 0 0 0 0 0 Reedholm - TCF Grant 0 0 0 0 0 Reedholm - Business Contribution 19,590 0 19,590 0 0 Schunk - TCF Grant 0 0 0 0 0 Schunk - Business Contribution 24,999 0 25,000 0 0 Sierra Microwave - Business Contribution 16,266 0 16,267 0 0 Xycarb Ceramics - TCF Grant 0 0 0 0 0 Xycarb Ceramics - Business Contribution 24,999 0 25,000 0 0 Infrastructure: Advanced Metal - TCF Grant 20,909 0 0 0 0 Advanced Metal - Business Contribution 0 0 0 0 0 Hewlett - TCF Grant 440,734 40,000 40,000 0 0 Hewlett - Business Contribution 0 0 0 0 0 Rivery Partners 0 700,000 50,000 650,000 0 Texas Electric Cooperatives - TCF Grant 335,844 0 0 0 0 Texas Electric Cooperatives - Business Contribution 0 0 0 0 0 Total Expenditures 1,307,072 740,000 175,857 650,000 0 Ending Fund Balance 85,857 0 0 0 0 CAPITAL PROJECTS ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 289 07-Ge0o EOR This page intentionally left blank. CAPITAL PROJECTS 290 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Debt DEBT TABLE OF CONTENTS DebtManagement & Policy......................................................................................................................289 OutstandingDebt By Type........................................................................................................................ 290 General Debt Service Principal & Interest Requirements.............................................................................................. 291 Legal Debt Margin ifiv, General-Obligation.................................................................................293 Utility Debt Service Principal & Interest Requiranents.............................................................................................. 294 Utility Revenue Bond Debt Coverage......................................................................................... 295 Proposed Debt Issues296 ................................................................................................................................ DEBT MANAGEMENT & POLICY The City's goal is to fund capital improvement projects on a"pay as you go" basis wherever possible. For large infrastructure projects and during heavy growth, debt financing is usually required. Debt financed projects must meet the City's long-term financing criteria as included in the Budget & Financial Policies. 115.1 Debt Policy City staff recommend the use of debt financing when appropriate. It will be judged appropriate when the following conditions exist: (1) non -continuous capital improvements are desired, and (2) future citizens will receive a benefit from the improvement. When the City of Georgetown utilizes long-term financing, it will ensure that the debt is soundly financed by: (1) conservatively projecting the revenue sources that will be utilized to pay the debt, (2) financing the improvement over a period not greater than the useful life of the improvement, and (3) determining that the cost benefit of the improvement including interest costs is positive." The City's debt management objective is to maintain level debt service that does not adversely impact tax or utility rates and does not hinder the City's ability to effectively operate the utility systems, street network, or other facilities. The City's debt payments must stay within provisions of state law, bond covenants and council adopted policies. All of these criteria and objectives are met with the debt financing proposed in this budget. The City of Georgetown's bonds are rated: Fitch Moody's Standard & Poor's DEBT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 General Obligation A I:` A Utility Revenue A 0 F1 289 Outstanding Delft summary - By Type as of October 1, 2000 Debt 2000/2001 Outstanding % Principal & Interest GENERAL OBLIGATION DEBT: Tax Supported: Streets and Transportation Parks and Recreation Facilities Public Safety Facilities Other Improvements Subtotal - Tax supported GO Debt 6,937,453 32% 746,629 2,009,553 9% 295,042 3,466,450 16% 336,565 4,534,900 21% 464,076 16,948,356 1,842,312 Self Supported: Airport 2,191,545 10% 174,952 Stormwater Drainage 2,865,099 13% 192,760 Subtotal - Self supported GO Debt 5,056,644 367,712 Total General Obligation Debt 22,005,000 100% 2,210,024 UTILITY REVENUE DEBT: Electric 9,426,548 29% 995,165 Water 12,209,492 38% 1,309,217 Wastewater 10,453,960 33% 1,117,916 Total Utility Revenue Debt 32,090,000 t00% 3,422,298 TOTAL DEBT OUTSTANDING 54,095,000 5,632,322 P: Stre General Obligation Debt Utility Revenue Debt Public Safety ,�tormwarer Other Electric Wastewater DEBT 290 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 GENERAL DEBT SERVICE SUMMARY The City's general obligation debt is primarily funded from a dedicated portion of local ad valorem tax. Certain issues are for specific purposes and will be repaid through dedicated revenues. Summary of Debt Service Charges to Maturity General Obligation Bonds and Certificates of Obligation - TAX SUPPORTED Year Ending Outstanding Total September 30 Beginning of Year Interest Principal Requirements 2001 16,948,356 914,852 927,460 1,842,312 2002 16,020,896 829,275 940,043 1,769,318 2003 15,080,853 779,716 989,708 1,769,424 2004 14,091,146 726,911 907,745 1,634,656 2005 13,183,400 679,985 642,776 1,322,761 2006 12,540,624 645,601 673,962 1,319,563 2007 11,866,661 609,710 713,590 1,323,300 2008 11,153,071 574,926 748,414 1,323,340 2009 10,404,657 537,867 783,238 1,321,105 2010 9,621,419 498,311 849,792 1,348,103 2011 8,771,627 455,925 887,860 1,343,785 2012 7,883,767 410,888 932,807 1,343,696 2013 6,950,960 363,163 980,452 1,343,616 2014 5,970,507 312,223 1,038,097 1,350,320 2015 4,932,410 258,234 1,088,440 1,346,675 2016 3,843,970 201,589 1,211,086 1,412,675 2017 2,632,884 138,433 1,275,067 1,413,499 2018 1,357,818 71,841 742,216 814,057 2019 615,602 33,182 495,602 528,784 2020 120,000 6,750 120,000 126,750 2,000,000 1,500,000 us 6, a °a 1,000,000 0 0 r 'r 500,000 0 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19 20 9,049,383 16,948,356 25,997,739 General Debt Service - Tax Supported DEBT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 291 Summary of Debt Service Charges to Maturity General Obligation Bonds and. Certificates of Obligation - SELF SUPPORTING Year Ending Outstanding Total September 30 Beginning of Year Interest Principal Requirements 2001 5,056,644 250,171 117,540 367,712 2002 4,939,104 244,386 204,957 449,343 2003 4,734,147 234,577 220,292 454,869 2004 4,513,854 223,865 252,255 476,119 2005 4,261,600 212,085 237,224 449,309 2006 4,024,376 201,070 246,038 447,108 2007 3,778,339 189,676 256,410 446,086 2008 3,521,929 177,587 271,586 449,173 2009 3,250,343 164,511 281,762 446,273 2010 2,968,581 150,676 270,208 420,884 2011 2,698,372 137,463 287,140 424,602 2012 2,411,232 123,152 297,193 420,344 2013 2,114,039 108,165 314,548 422,712 2014 1,799,492 92,090 326,903 418,993 2015 1,472,589 75,087 346,560 421,646 2016 1,126,029 57,007 298,914 355,921 2017 827,116 42,061 314,933 356,994 2018 512,182 26,314 367,784 394,098 2019 144,398 7,581 144,398 151,979 600,000 500,000 400,000 m 300,000 Cl 3 0 tL- 200,000 100,000 0 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19 2,717,522 5,056,644 7,774,165 General Debt service - Self supporting DEBT 292 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 4 LEGAL DEBT MARGIN FOR GENERAL OBLIGATIONS: All taxable property within the City is subject to the assessment, levy and collection by the City of a continuing, direct annual ad valorem tax sufficient to provide for the payment of principal and interest on the Bonds within the limits prescribed by law. Article XI, Section 5, of the Texas Constitution is applicable to the City, and limits the maximum ad valorem tax rate to $2.50 per $100 assessed valuation (for all City purposes). The Charter of the City adopts the provisions of the constitution without further limitation. Under rules promulgated by the Office of the Attorney General of Texas, such office will not approve tax bonds of the City unless the City can demonstrate its ability to pay debt service requirements on all outstanding City tax bonds, including the issue to be approved, from a tax levy of $1.25 per $100 of valuation, based on 90% collection of tax. Allowable levy per $100 valuation $1.25000 Proposed levy for debt service (included in total adopted rate of $.31409) .11562 Percentage of allowable levy used 10.0% RATIO OF DIRECT DEBT TO TAXABLE VALUATION 91193 93/94 94/95 95/96 96/97 97/98 98199 99/00 00/07 07!02- uzlu;5- u:5/u4' MUD- , •Projected DEBT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 293 UTILITY DEBT SERVICE The City has issued debt in the form of revenue bonds to finance construction of electric, water and wastewater improvements. The debt is secured by the net operating revenue of all combined revenues of those utilities. The allocation of debt principal and costs is based on the use of each bond issue. Each utility fund pays debt service from operating revenues. Summary of Utility Debt ,Service Charges to Maturity: Year Ending Outstanding Total September 30 Beginning of Year Interest Principal Requirements 2001 32,090,000 1,617,298 1,805,000 3,422,298 2002 30,285,000 1,444,830 2,015,000 3,459,830 2003 28,270,000 1,358,879 2,085,000 3,443,879 2004 26,185,000 1,268,964 2,200,000 3,468,964 2005 23,985,000 1,168,276 2,265,000 3,433,276 2006 21,720,000 1,063,253 2,240,000 3,303,253 2007 19,480,000 959,530 2,200,000 3,159,530 2008 17,280,000 858,608 1,950,000 2,808,608 2009 15,330,000 768,966 1,995,000 2,763,966 2010 13,335,000 675,304 2,040,000 2,715,304 2011 11,295,000 577,521 1,740,000 2,317,521 2012 9,555,000 491,994 1,780,000 2,271,994 2013 7,775,000 403,664 1,535,000 1,938,664 2014 6,240,000 325,996 1,615,000 1,940,996 2015 4,625,000 242,973 1,715,000 1,957,973 2016 2,910,000 154,573 715,000 869,573 2017 2,195,000 117,540 720,000 837,540 2018 1,475,000 79,890 795,000 874,890 2019 680,000 38,250 330,000 368,250 2020 350,000 19,688 350,000 369,688 3,500,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0 13,635,995 32,090,000 45,725,995 Utility Debt Service '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19 '20 DEBT 294 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 UTILITY REVENUE BOND DEBT COVERAGE The City has agreed through its bond ordinances to maintain a minimum "times coverage" ratio of 1.25. The ordinance allows the City to eliminate its reserve fund requirement with coverage of 1.35 or better. The times ratio is calculated using the net revenue available for debt service from the combined Water, Electric and Wastewater utilities' operations divided by the combined debt service requirement of the utilities. The times coverage ratio is also reviewed by bond rating agency analysts when the City receives a rating for a potential bond issue. The following combined times coverage ratios have occurred, based on actual revenues and expenditures, for the fiscal years indicated: 8.00 6.00 4.00 2.00 UTILITY REVENUE BOND COVERAGE 0.00 92/93 93/94 94/95 95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00' 00/01' 'Projected The 2000/01Proposed Operating Plan provides the revenue to debt ratios shown below. The City's Budget and Financial policies require that each utility maintain separate coverage of at least 1.5. The excess coverage provided by each fund is used to pay for related utility system capital improvements and transfers out as approved by the City Council. Water Electric Wastewater Fund Fund Fund Total REVENUE: All Other Revenue 1,231,235 865,657 771,925 2,868,897 Interest 100,500 106,100 51,225 257,825 System Billings 6,715,000 19,543,796 4,000,000 30,258,796 Total Revenues 8,046,735 20,515,553 4,823,150 33,385,438 EXPENSES: Departments 4,294,252 15,661,382 2,153,576 22,909,290 Total Expenditures 4,294,252 15,661,382 2,153,576 22,909,290 Net Available for Debt Service 3,752,483 4,854,171 2,669,574 99,276,228 Annual Debt Requirement 1,309,217 995,165 1,117,916 3,422,298 Times Coverage Ratio 2.87 4.88 2.39 3.29 DEBT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 295 296 Proposed 2000/01 Debt Certificates of Obligation: Parks Improvements Lighting of Athletic Complex $ 490,000 Street Improvements Street projects 640,000 Total Certificates of Obligation 1,130,000 `Not included in tax rate calculation; subject to future discussion as projects arise Utility Revenue Bonds: Electric System Improvements 1,530,000 Total Utility Revenue Bonds 1,530,000 Total Proposed 2000/01 $ 2,660,000 Electric System Improvements 58% nprovements 24% rks Improvements 18% Note: The City expects Total Debt Outstanding to be $53,905,000 at September 30, 2001, which includes the 2000101 proposed issue and $2,850,000 of principal reduction. DEBT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Financial Impact: General Obligation Debt: => Capital improvements are reviewed and adjusted each year by City Council and staff, with debt issuances being adjusted accordingly. The on-going City facility needs assessment and expansion, along with the finalization of major street projects, will compose the majority of the need for additional debt issuance in the upcoming five year horizon. => The City will review its Stormwater Drainage project needs in the upcoming year and determine funding sources for projects that are deemed necessary. => Additional funding sources being reviewed as a means to fund future streets and other General Obligation projects, including Parks and Facilities. Utility Revenue Debt: => Debt proceeds will be used for system expansion and repaid through continued growth of the City's customer base. Capital projects and related debt are reviewed against actual needs and customer growth in each year. => A rate study, which is planned for the 2000/01 fiscal year, will determine whether utility rates will need any adjustments during the next five years. Summary of Estimated Debt Needs: Fiscal Year 00/01 01102 02103 03104 04/05 General Obligation: Tax supported: Facility Expansion 0 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 Parks Improvements 490,000 0 0 0 0 Street Improvements 640,000 4,280,000 2,450,000 2,645,000 2,225,000 Self-supporting., Stormwater Drainage 0 0 877,000 475,000 325,000 Utility Revenue: Electric 1,050,000 1,800,000 1,800,000 1,700,000 1,700,000 Water 0 0 0 0 2,500,000 Wastewater 0 0 0 450,000 800,000 Total Estimated Debt Needs 2,180,000 7,080,000 6,127,000 6,270,000 B,550,000 DEBT ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 297 �o� GEORG��o Vn �ED � This page intentionally left blank. DEBT 299 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 deference r- REFERENCE TABLE OF CONTENTS Personnel................................................................................................................................................... 299 CriticalNeeds............................................................................................................................................ 306 TransfersBetween Funds.......................................................................................................................... 311 InternalService Premiums......................................................................................................I.................. 312 Ordinances................................................................................................................................................. 314 Budget& Financial Policies...................................................................................................................... 323 UtilityRate Schedule................................................................................................................................. 341 AdvisoryBoards & Commissions............................................................................................................. 344 The 2000/01 Operating Plan will include 10 additional full-time positions and 2 upgraded positions. • Fire Services will add six new Firefighters and add a full-time 911 Addressing Coordinator; • Management Services will add two full-time positions in the Legal Department; • Employee & Organizational Services will upgrade the Administrative Assistant to HR Generalist; • Employee & Organizational Services and Information Resources will share duties of an Administrative Assistant; • Information Resources will add a full-time Webmaster position; • Community Services will upgrade a Shelter Attendant position to full-time. 98199 99100 99100 00/01 01102 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES ADMINISTRATION Full Time Division Director 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Manager - COU+ 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Secretary / Receptionist (COU) 1 1 1 1 1 Dispatcher (COU) 1 1 1 1 1 Total Administration (FT / PT) 5/ 0 5/ 0 5/ 0 5/ 0 5/ 0 SYSTEMS ENGINEERING Full Time Feld Representative 1 1 1 1 1 Chief Field Representative 0 0.5 0.5 1 1 Engineering Technician 1 1 1 1 1 Systems Engineering Manager 1 1 1 1 1 Total Systems Engineering (FT/ PT) 3 10 3.5 10 3.5 /0 4 10 4 10 ELECTRIC Full Time Energy Services Manager 1 1 1 1 1 Operations Team Leader+ 1 1 1 1 1 Systems Operator 0 1 1 1 1 Electric Inspector+ 2 2 2 2 2 Crew Leader+ 3 3 3 3 3 First Class Line Technician+ 2 2 2 2 2 Line Technician+ 2 2 2 2 2 Apprentice Line Technician+ 5 5 5 5 5 Part Time Electric Warehouse Clerk (seasonal) 025 0 0 0 0 Total Electric (FTI PT) 16 / 025 17 10 17 10 17 10 17 10 PUMP MAINTENANCE Full Time Pump Supervisor1 1 1 1 1 Pump Mechanic III 2 2 2 2 2 Pump Mechanic II 2 2 2 2 2 Pump Mechanic 1 2 2 2 2 2 Part Time Field Maintenance Wkr.-Pumps (seasonal) 0.25 025 0.25 0.25 025 Total Pump Maintenance (FT / PT) 7 1025 7 / 0.25 7 1 025 7 / 025 7 / 025 STORMWATER DRAINAGE Full Time Drainage Foreman+ 1 1 1 1 1 Light Equipment Operator 1 1 1 1 1 Street Sweeper Operator 1 1 1 1 1 Part Time Maintenance Operator 1 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Stormwater Drainage (FTI PT) 3 / 0.5 3 / 0.5 3 / 0.5 3 / 0.5 3 /0.5 +Various positions are renamed beginning 2000/01 to provide continuity of positions across divisions. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 299 PERSONNEL (CONT.) COMMUNITY SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Full Time Division Director 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Part Time Staff Assistant 0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Administration (FT 1 PT) 98199 99/00 99100 00101 01/02 AIRPORT Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected STREETS Full Time 1 1 1 1 1 Transportation Services Manager+ 1 1 1 1 1 CIP Construction Coordinator 025 1 1 1 1 Streets Foreman+ 1 1 1 1 1 Light Equipment Operator 7 7 7 7 7 Heavy Equipment Operator 2 2 2 2 2 Part Time 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Street Maintenance Worker 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Street Maintenance Worker (seasonal) 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 025 Total Streets (FTI PT) 1125 / 0.75 12 / 0.75 12 / 0.75 12 / 0.75 12 / 0.75 WASTEWATER COLLECTION 1 1 1 1 1 Full Time 3 3 3 3 3 Water & Wastewater Supervisor 1 1 1 1 1 Wastewater Maintenance Worker III 1 1 1 1 1 Wastewater Maintenance Worker II 1 1 1 1 1 Wastewater Maintenance Worker 1 3 3 3 3 3 Part Time 525 / 0.5 6 / 0 6 / 0 6.5 / 0 6.5 / 0 Field Maintenance Worker (PT) 1 1 1 1 1 Total Wastewater Collection (FT /PT) 6 /1 6/ 1 6 /1 6/ 1 6 /1 WATER DISTRIBUTION 1 1 1 1 1 Full Time 0.5 0.5 0.5 0 0 Water / Wastewater Worker III 2 2 2 2 2 Water/ Wastewater Worker II 1 1 1 1 1 Water /Wastewater Worker 1 4 4 4 4 4 Water Services Manager 0.5 1 1 1 1 Total Water Distribution (FT / PT) 7.5 10 8 / 0 8 / 0 8 / 0 8 / 0 TOTAL COMMUNITY OWNED UTILITIES(FT/PT) 58.75 12.75 61.5 / 2.5 61.5 / 2.5 62 /2.5 62 /2.5 COMMUNITY SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Full Time Division Director 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Part Time Staff Assistant 0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Administration (FT 1 PT) 2 / 0 2 / 0.5 2 / 0.5 2 / 0.5 2 / 0.5 AIRPORT Full Time Administration: Airport Director 1 1 1 1 1 Airport Maintenance Worker 1 1 1 1 1 Part Time Operations: Bookkeeper (PT) 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Fuel Attendants (PT) 2 3 3 3 3 Fuel Attendant (seasonal) 025 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Airport Maintenance Worker (PT) 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Airport (FT 1 PT) 2 / 325 2 / 425 2 /4.25 2 / 425 2 / 425 ANIMAL SERVICES Full Time Animal Services Director+ 1 1 1 1 1 Animal Control Officer 3 3 3 3 3 Animal Services Clerk 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 Shelter Attendant' 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1 Shelter Attendant 0.5 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 'Upgraded to Full Time position 2006VD7 Total Animal Services (FT / PT) 525 / 0.5 6 / 0 6 / 0 6.5 / 0 6.5 / 0 SANITATION Full Time Collection Station Teamleader 1 1 1 1 1 Collection Station Attendant' 0.5 0.5 0.5 0 0 PartTime Collection Station Attendant 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1 Previously a shared Full Tm1e position with Arun! Services Total Sanitation (FT / PT) 1.5 / 0.5 1.5 / 0.5 1.5 / 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 1 +Various positions are renamed beginning 2000101 to provide continuity of positions across divisions. REFERENCE 300 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 PERSONNEL (CONT. DEVELOPMENT SERVICES INSPECTION SERVICES 98/99 Actual 99/00 Budget 99100 Actual 00101 Adopted 01/02 Projected LIBRARY Full Time 1 1 1 1 1 Library Services Director 1 1 1 1 1 Asst Lib. Director/Reference Librarian 1 1 1 1 1 Assistant Library Director+ 1 1 1 1 1 Evening/Weekend Services Supervisor 1 1 1 1 1 Technical Services Librarian 1 1 1 1 1 Library Specialist I- Children 1 1 1 1 1 - Library Children's Svcs Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Library Assistant- Public Services 1 1 1 1 1 - Library Assistant 2 2 2 2 2 Staff Assistant - Library' 0.75 0.75 1 1 1 PartTime 1 1 1 1 1 Library Assistant (5) 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 Library Page (4) 2 2 2 2 2 Technical Services Library Assistant 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Library Technical Services Cataloger' 0.5 0.5 0 0 0 - 'Combined part-time staffassistant 8 cataloger to make lull -time position 1999/00 1 1 1 1 Total Library (FT / PT) 10 / 6.25 10 / 6.25 11 IS 11 /5 11 / 5 TOTAL COMMUNITY SERVICES (FT /P7) 20.75 / 10.5 21.5 / 11.5 22.5 / 10.25 22.5 / 10.75 22.5 110.75 DEVELOPMENT SERVICES INSPECTION SERVICES Full Time Building Official 1 1 1 1 1 Combination Building Inspector+ 5 5 5 5 5 Code Enforcement Officer 1 1 1 1 1 Staff Assistant+ 1 1 1 1 1 Utility Inspector 1 1 1 1 1 PartTime Permit Technician" 1 1 1 1 1 Total Inspection Services (FT / PT) 9/ 1 9/ 1 9 1 1 9/ 1 9/ 1 DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT Full Time - Division Director 1 1 1 1 1 Chief Planner -Long Range 1 1 1 1 1 Development Planner- Long Range 0 1 1 1 1 Chief Planner -Current 1 1 1 1 1 Development Accounts Specialist 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Telephone Receptionist 1 1 1 1 1 PartTime Development Planner' 0.5 0 0 0 0 'Upgraded to Poll -time in 1999/00 Total Development Support (FT / PT) 6 / 0.5 7 / 0 7 / 0 7 / 0 7 / 0 -- DEVELOPMENTPROCESS TEAM Full Time Planning Technician 2 2 2 2 2 Development Engineer 1 1 1 1 1 Electric System Planner 0.25 0 0 0 0 Development Techmaan 1 1 1 1 1 Development Planner 2 2 2 2 2 Building Plan Reviewer 1 1 1 1 1 - Total Development Process Team (FT / PT) 7.25 / 0 7 / 0 7 / 0 7 10 7 / 0 _ TOTAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES (FT/P7) 22.25 / 1.5 23 / 1 23 / 1 23 / 1 23 / 1 +Various positions are renamed beginning 2000/01 to provide continuity ofpositions across divisions. J REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 301 PERSONNEL (CONT.) 96199 99100 99100 Mill 01102 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM` 'New divisor separated from Community Services ADMINISTRATION Full Time 1 1 1 1 1 Division Director 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant - 1 FTE NEW IN 2000/01 0 0 0 1 1 Total Administration (FT I PT) 1/ 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 2/ 0 2/ 0 CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU 3 / 0.5 3 / 0.5 3 10.5 4 / 0.5 4 / 0.5 Full Time 1 1 2 2 2 CVB Manager+ 1 1 1 1 1 Total Convention & Visitors Bureau (FTI PT) 1/ 0 1/ 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1/ 0 Main Street Full Time Main Street Manager/Visitor Center Coordinator 1 1 1 1 1 Part Time 2 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 Secretary/Receptionist 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Main Street (FT I PT) 1 / 0.5 1 / 0.5 1 1 0.5 1 / 0.5 1 / 0.5 - TOTAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURISM (FT/P7) 3 / 0.5 3 / 0.5 3 10.5 4 / 0.5 4 / 0.5 FINANCE 8& ADMINISTRATION ACCOUN77NG Full Time Accounting Clerk' 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Accounting Specialist -314 Time 2 2.75 2.75 2.75 2.75 Controller 1 1 1 1 1 Payroll Specialist+- 0 0 0 1 1 Senior Accountant- 1 1 0 0 0 Stan Accountant 1 1 2 2 2 PartTime Accounting Specialist 0.5 0 0 0 0 -Rdlfimo position shared wifh Munidpaf Court "Mowed posifon hpn EOS -ReUassifad to Stall Accountant 1999100 Total Accounting (FT / PT) 5.5 1 0.5 6.25 10 6.25 10 725 10 7.25 / 0 ADMINISTRATION Full Time Division Director 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 _ Total Administration (FT / PT) 2/ 0 2/ 0 2/ 0 2 10 2/ 0 FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Full Time Facilities Maintenance Worker 1 1 1 1 1 Total Facilities Maintenance (FTI PT) 1 10 1/ 0 1/ o 1 10 1/ 0 VEHICLE SERVICE CENTER Full Time Vehicle Services Supervisor 1 1 1 1 1 Mechanic Vehicle Services 3 3 3 3 3 Total Vehicle Service Center (FT / PT) 4 10 4 10 4/ 0 4/ 0 4/ 0 MUNICIPAL COURT Full Time Municipal Court Clerk 1 1 1 1 1 Deputy Court Clerk/StafAssistant' 0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 Deputy Court Clerk 1 1 1 1 1 'Fdk- w poslfon shared with Accounting Total Municipal Court (FTI PT) 2 10 2.5 10 2.5 10 2.5 10 2.5 to PURCHASING d PROPERTIES Full Time Support Services Director 1 1 1 1 1 Purchasing Agent 1 1 1 1 1 Purchasing Buyer' 1 1 1 1 1 Purchasing Specialist+ 1 1 1 1 1 Warehouse Supervisor+ _ 1 1 1 1 1 Electric Warehouse Clerk 0.5 1 1 1 1 ' Posilion reofassified and foe changed Lwn Assistant Total Purchasing & Properties (FTI PT) 5/ 0.5 6/ 0 6 10 6/ 0 6/ 0 +Various positions are renamed beginning 2000/01 to provide continuity ofposifions across divisions. REFERENCE 302 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 PERSONNEL (CONT.) ADMINISTRATION 98199 99/00 99/00 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected UTILITY OFFICE Fire Chief 1 1 - Full Time 1 1 Administrative Manager - Fire+ 1 Utility Office Director 1 1 1 1 1 Meter Reader Supervisor 1 0 0 0 0 Meter Readers 1 2 2 2 2 Customer Service Supervisor 1 1 1 1 1 Customer Service Rep 1 3 3 3 3 3 Utilities Accounts Specialist 2 2 2 2 2 Total Utility Office (FT/PT) 9/ 0 9/ 0 9/ 0 9/ 0 9/ 0 TOTAL FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION (FT/P7) 28.5 / 1 30.75 / 0 30.75 / 0 31.75 1 0 31.75 /0 Fire Captain FIRE SERVICES 0 0 0 ADMINISTRATION Full Time Fire Chief 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Manager - Fire+ 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant+ 1 2 2 2 2 Secretary/Receptionist 1 0 0 0 0 Total Administration (FT / PT) 4/ 0 4/ 0 4/ 0 4 1 0 4/ 0 PREVENTION & COMMUNITY ANALYSIS 0 0 0 1 1 Full Time 2 2 2 2 2 Fire Marshall 1 1 1 1 1 Fire Captain 1 0 0 0 0 Municipal Code Inspector 1 2 2 2 2 PartTime Fire Code Inspector 1 1 1 1 1 Total Prevention & Community Analysis (FT / PT) 3/ 1 3 1 1 3/ 1 3/ 1 3/ 1 OPERATIONS Full Time Asst. Operations Chief/911 Addressing -1 FTE NEWIN 00/01 0 0 0 1 1 Captains 3 3 3 3 3 Lieutenant 9 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 Apparatus Operator 9 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 Firefighters - 6 FTE NEW IN 00/01 12 10.5 10.5 18 18 '6 new for 00/01 & 1.5 increase from 99/00 new hires Total Operations (FT / PT) 33 10 34.5 / 0 34.5 / 0 43 /0 43 / 0 TOTAL FIRE SERVICES (FT / PT) 40 / 1 41.5 / 1 41.5 / 1 50 / 1 50 / 1 INFORMATION RESOURCES INFORMATION RESOURCES Full Time Division Director 0.75 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Network Administrator 1 1 1 1 1 Project Manager/Training Coordinator+ 1 1 1 1 1 Public Safety Administrator 0 1 1 1 1 Webmaster -1 FTE NEW IN 2000/01 0 0 0 1 1 Technical Support Specialist 2 2 2 2 2 Part Time Mail Couriers 0.5 0 0 0 0 TOTAL INFORMATION RESOURCES (FT/P7) 5.75 1 0.5 7 1 0 7/ 0 8/ 0 8/ 0 +Various positions are renamed beginning 2000/01 to provide continuity ofpositfons across divisions. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 303 PERSONNEL (CONT.) 98/99 99/00 99/00 00/01 01/02 Actual Budget Actual Adopted Projected MANAGEMENT SERVICES LEGAL SERVICES Full Time City Attorney 1 1 1 1 1 Assistant City Attorney - 1 FTE NEW IN 2000/01 1 1 1 2 2 Legal Assistant/Paralegal - 1 FTE NEW IN 2000(01 2 2 2 3 3 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Total Legal Services IFT / PT) 5/ 0 5/ 0 5/ 0 7 1 0 7/ 0 C/7YMANAGER'S OFFICE Full Time City Manager 1 1 1 1 1 City Secretary' 1 1 1 1 1 Assistant City Manager 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Assistant to City Manager 1 1 1 1 1 Staff Assistant 0 1 1 1 1 PartTime 1 1 1 1 1 City Management Intern 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25 Mail Couriers 0 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 *Transferred to City Council budget 1999/00 1 1 1 1 1 Total City Manager's Office (FT I PT) 5 10.25 6 10.75 6 / 0.75 6 10.75 6 / 0.75 EMPLOYEE & ORGANIZATIONAL SERVICES Full Time Director of Employee & Organizational Svcs. 0.25 1 1 1 1 Human Resources Director 1 1 1 1 1 Payroll Specialist+' 1 1 1 0 0 Human Resources Generalist' 1 1 1 2 2 Administrative Assistant' 1 1 1 0 0 •Moved to Accounting 2000/01 1 1 1 1 1 "Upgraded to HR Generalist 2000x01 1 1 1 1 1 Total Employee & Organizational Services (FT / PT) 425 /0 5 10 5 to 4 / 0 4 /0 SAFETY SERVICES 5 6.5 6.5 7 7 Full Time Safety Manager 1 1 1 1 1 Safety Specialist 1 1 1 1 1 Total Safety Services (FT / PT) 2/ 0 2/ 0 2/ 0 2/ 0 2/ 0 TOTAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES (FT/P7) 1625 /0.25 18 10.75 18 10.75 19 10.75 19 /0.75 PARKS & RECREATION SERVICES PARKS Full Time Division Director 1 1 1 1 1 Administrative Manager- P& R+ 1 1 1 1 1 Parks Superintendent 1 1 1 1 1 Project Coordinator/Turf Manager 1 1 1 1 1 Secretary/Receptionist 0 0 0 1 1 Urban Forester 1 1 1 1 1 Park Foreman 1 1 1 1 1 Park Maintenance Worker II 3 3 3 3 3 Park Maintenance Worker 1 5 6.5 6.5 7 7 Square Maintenance Worker 1 1 1 1 1 Part Time Park Maintenance Worker I (Seasonal) 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 •Redassed from Recreation Total Parks (FT / PT) 15 /1.5 16.5 /1.5 16.5 / 1.5 18 / 1.5 18 /1.5 +Various positions are renamed beginning 2000/01 to provide continuity of positions across divisions. REFERENCE 304 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 PERSONNEL(CONCLUDED) TOTAL PARKS E REC SVCS (FT/P7) 22 / 17 26.5 1 1625 2725 1 15.75 28 1 15.75 28 / 15.75 POLICE SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 9111199 Actual 991M Budget 99150 Actual 00101/ Adopted Projected RECREATION 1 1 1 1 1 Full Time 1 1 1 t 1 Athletic Coordinator 1 1 1 1 1 Children's Coordinator' 0 0 0.75 1 1 Tennis Center Superintendent 1 1 1 1 1 Recreation Superintendent 1 1 1 1 1 Secretary/Receptionist" 1 1 1 0 0 Recreation Supervisor 2 2 2 2 2 Challenge Course Coordinator 0 1 1 1 1 Tennis Instructor 0 1 1 1 1 Recreation Coordinator 0 1 1 1 1 Youth Adventure Coordinator- 1 1 1 1 1 Part Time 1 1 0 0 0 Pool Staff, Seasonal (31) 7.75 7.75 7.75 7.75 7.75 Camp Staff, Seasonal (12) 3 3.25 2.75 2.75 2.75 Recreation Assistant (6) 4.75 3.75 3.75 3.75 3.75 'Upgraded Camp a}ectorPw1im to Full Tim 1 0 0 0 0 "Roclassod to Parks Adrru'nisi a6w --Pnw grant funded posi0'm 15 10 14 /0 13 / 0 13 10 13 10 Total Recreation (FT I PT) 7 115.5 10 / 14.75 10.75 114.25 10 1 1425 10 114.25 TOTAL PARKS E REC SVCS (FT/P7) 22 / 17 26.5 1 1625 2725 1 15.75 28 1 15.75 28 / 15.75 POLICE SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 17 10 17 /0 17 / 0 17 / 0 17 10 Full Time 1 1 1 1 1 Division Director 1 1 1 t 1 Administrative Lieutenant 1 1 1 t 1 Administrative Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 Public Information Officer 1 1 1 1 1 Total Administration (FT /PT) 4/ 0 4/ 0 4 1 0 4/ 0 4 1 0 SPECIAL OPERATIONS 1 1 1 1 1 Full Time Police Lieutenant 1 1 1 1 1 Police Officer -Detective 7 7 7 7 7 Evidence Technician 1 1 1 1 1 Sergeant (Youth Svc/Ed. Team) 1 1 1 1 1 Sergeant' 1 1 0 0 0 Victim's Services Coordinator 0 1 1 1 1 Great Officer (Youth Svc./Ed. Team) 2 2 2 2 2 Staff Assistant (Youth Svc./Ed. Team) 1 0 0 0 0 Staff Assistant (Special Operations) 1 0 0 0 0 'Transrem3d b Patrd 1999/00 Total Special Operations (FT I PT) 15 10 14 /0 13 / 0 13 10 13 10 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Full Time Information Management Director 1 1 1 1 1 Records Teamleader 1 1 1 1 1 Records Specialist 1 1 1 1 1 Communication Supervisor 1 1 1 1 1 Communications Operator 13 13 13 13 13 Total Information Management (FT /PT) 17 10 17 /0 17 / 0 17 / 0 17 10 PATROL 1 1 1 1 1 Full Time 1 1 1 1 1 Police Lieutenant 1 1 1 1 1 Police Sergeant 3 3 3 3 3 Police Corporal' 3 3 5 5 5 Police Officer" 22 22 23 23 23 Staff Assistant 1 1 1 1 1 411a slened Poke Officer and Sergeant pocfim to be Corporals 1999/00 '-Hired t . timPdice Officers due to require nls of grant 1999x00 Total Patrol (FT I PT) 30 / 0 30 / 0 33 1 0 33 10 33 10 PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS - Full Time Police Lieutenant 1 1 1 1 1 Police Sergeant 1 1 1 1 1 Services Coordinator (Prof. Stand. Asst.) 1 1 1 1 1 Total Professional Standards (FT / PT) 3 10 3/ 0 3/ 0 3 1 0 3 1 0 TOTAL POLICE SERVICES (FT/P7) 69 / 0 68 / 0 70 10 70 1 0 70 /0 TOTAL EMPLOYEES (FT / PT) 286.25 135 300.75 / 33.5 304.5 / 31.75 318.25 / 32.25 318.25 / 3225 +Various positions are renamed beginning 2000/01 to provide continuity of positions across divisions. REFERENCE ` ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 305 Critical Needs are categorized as legal mandates, safety issues, or the need for funding to continue the same level of service that is expected by citizens (as identified at the Town Hall meeting) and Council (priorities defined in the 2000/01 budget process). 306 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Community Owned Utilities Administration Joint Svc COU Admin Performance Audit- Festival Joint Svc COU Admin Neighborhood Link 15,000 Joint Svc COU Admin San Gabriel River Salamander Study 20,000 Water ops Performance Audit - OMI 15,000 Water ops Obtain 10,000 acre feet of Water from LCRA Total Administration 0 50,000 Energy Services Electric I ops Electric Deregulation Total Energy Services 0 0 Transportation Services Streets -SRF streets Transportation Consultant 50,000 0 Streets -SRF streets Transportation Engineer 0 67,307 Streets -SRF streets Savings on Transportation Engineer (13,131) Streets -SRF streets Office Supplies 0 200 Streets -SRF streets Training 0 2,000 Streets -SRF streets Cellular Phone 0 700 Streets -SRF streets Dues 0 400 Streets -SRF streets Computer 0 2,500 Streets -SRF streets Sidewalk Master Plan 50,000 Streets -SRF I streets ISpeed Limit Evaluation 0 Total Transportation Services 50,000 109,976 Total Community Owned Utilities 50,000 159,976 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Community Services Administration Gfund I comm svc Full time Secretary 0 16,596 Total Administration 0 16,596 General Government Contracts Gfund Contracts Social Service Contracts 5,000 Gfund Comm Svc Affordable Housing 30,000 Gfund Contracts Health District 42,750 Gfund Contracts Health District included in base (42,750) Gfund Contracts Stonehaven 12,000 1,200 Gfund Contracts WBCO 10,000 Gfund Contracts Literacy Council 2,500 2,500 Gfund Contracts CARTS 10,000 12,500 Gfund Contracts Georgetown Project 10,000 60,000 Gfund Contracts Art Guild 24,000 Gfund Contracts GIVE 6,500 13,500 Gfund Contracts WBCO - Nutrition Program 5,000 0 Gfund Contracts WBCO - Headstart Program 7,200 Gfund Contracts Project Graduation 500 Gfund Contracts I Crisis Center 1 10,000 51000 Total General Governmental Contracts 1 91,000 136,400 REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 CRITICAL NEEDS (CONT.) Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Airport Operations Airport I admin I Noise Study 25,000 Total Airport Operations 25,000 0 Animal Services Gfund Animal Svc Full time shelter Attendant 12,342 Gfund Animal Svc Animal Shelter Facility 713,000 Total Animal Services 12,342 713,000 Library Gfund Library Upgrade PT to FT 0 16,720 Gfund Library Office Furniture 0 3,300 Gfund Library FT assistant in Children's Room 0 26,140 Gfund Library Office Furniture 0 3,300 Gfund Library Needs Assesment-Facility 34,500 Gfund Library Hot Water for Library 3,500 Gfund Library Hot Water ongoing cost 300 Gfund Library Interim Facility Reconfiguration 3,000 Gfund I Library jAdditional Shelving 1 01 10,000 Total Library 0 1 100,760 Total Community Services 128,342 966,756 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Economic Development Economic Develoment CVB Admin I Industrial Recruitment 0 160,000 Total Economic Development 0 160,000 Convention & Visitors Bureau CVB Cve Staff Assistant 0 32,360 CVB CVB Cost Savings I (10,660) Total Covention & Visitors Bureau 0 21,700 Main Street Program CVB I Main St lContracted Services 0 20,000 Total Main Street Program 0 20,000 Total Economic Development 0 201,700 Not Fund Dept Description Included Included Development Services _ _._ ... ....._._......_..____.....____.......... ......... _.._.......... __.......... ..... .... Development Process Team Gfund Dev Process Century Plan Review 300,000 Gfund Dev Process Code Enforcement Officer 36,437 Gfund Dev Process Office supplies 400 Gfund Dev Process Training 700 Gfund Dev Process Uniforms 400 Gfund Dev Process Cellular Phone 180 Gfund Dev Process Cellular Service 400 Gfund Dev Process Gas, Oil, & Tires 750 Gfund Dev Process Vehicle 18,730 Gfund Dev Process Furniture 830 Gfund Dev Process Phone Line 75 Gfund Dev Process Computer 2,500 Gfund Dev Process I Software 530 Total Development Process Team 0 361,932 Note: Costs for personnel include all benefits, supplies, training and capital to place the position in service. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 307 CRITICAL NEEDS (CONT. Note: Costs for personnel include all benefits, supplies, training and capital to place the position in service. REFERENCE 308 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Development Support Gfund Dev support 911 Addressing Coordinator 0 Gfund Dev support Office supplies 0 Gfund Dev Support Training 0 Total Development Support 0 0 Inspection Services Gfund inspection Water Quality Public Presentations Electric Contracts I Energy Conservation Rebates 42,000 Total Inspection Services 0 42,000 Total Development Services 0 403,932 Not Fund DepL Description Included Included Finance & Administration Finance Joint Svc I Finance lCompetitive Fee Analysis 50,000 Total Finance 50,000 0 Fleet Maintenance Internal Service Fund Fleet Service PT vocational student from GHS 8,000 Fleet service Outsourced PM (8,000) Fleet service Mechanic 37,572 Fleet Service Clothing Allowance 550 Fleet service Safety Boots 100 Fleet Service Small Tools 2,000 Total Facilities Maintenance 0 1 40,222 Total Finance & Administration 50,000 40,222 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Fire Services Total Fire Administration 0 0 Fire Operations Gfund Fire Admin Operations Chief 41,097 Gfund Fire Admin Office supplies 400 Gfund Fire Admin Training 2,000 Gfund Fire ops Organizational & Leadership Changes 71,760 Gfund Fire Ops Protective Clothing 3,038 Gfund Fire ops Uniforms 3,350 Gfund Fire ops Pager 120 Gfund Fire ops Promotion to Asst Chief of Ops 10,000 Gfund Fire ops Promotion to Asst. Chief in Training 10,000 Gfund Fire ops Computer 2,500 Gfund Fire Ops Vehicle 4,000 Gfund Fire ops Firefighters Station #4 (6) 215,280 Gfund Fire ops Savings on Firefighters (14,518) Gfund Fire ops Protective Equipment (6) 9,114 Gfund Fire ops Uniforms (6) 6,349 Gfund Fire Admin Pagers (6) 360 Gfund Fire ops Pumper Station #4 280,000 Gfund Fire ops I Equipment carried on Pumper 70,000 Total Fire Operations 260,082 1 454,768 Total Fire Services 260,082 454,768 Note: Costs for personnel include all benefits, supplies, training and capital to place the position in service. REFERENCE 308 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 CRITICAL NEEDS (CONT.) Note: Costs for personnel include all benefits, supplies, training and capital to place the position in service. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 309 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Information Resources Information Resources Management IR Admin Webmaster/Developer/Administrator 50,183 IR admin Training 3,500 IR Admin Office Supplies 500 IR Admin Telephone 1,000 IR Admin Furniture 1,000 IR Replace Computer 2,500 IR Admin Technical Support -Library 38,766 IR Admin Savings on Technical Support (3,003) IR Admin Office Supplies 500 IR Admin Training 1,500 IR Admin Telephone 750 IR Admin Network Connection 300 IR Admin Computer 3,500 IR Admin Furniture 1,000 Gfund Council Records Management 12,500 Gfund I Council Supplies/Materials for assessment 1,500 Total IR Management 72,683 43,313 Information Resources Capital Replacement Total IR Capital Replacement 0 0 Total Information Resources 72,683 43,313 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Management Services _.........._..__........_. _.......__....... __......... .._._......... _._._... _...... __......... .._....._.........- --........_..__........ _ ...._ City Council Total City Council 0 0 City Manager's Office Gfund City Mgr Public Information Officer 50,998 Gfund CityMgr Subscriptions & Dues 750 Gfund City Mgr Travel & Training 1,000 Gfund City Mgr Printing 10,000 Gfund City Mgr Software 1,000 Gfund City Mgr Desk & Office Supplies 1,500 Gfund I City Mgr I Computer 2,500 Total City Managers Office 0 67,748 Total City Council & City Manager's Office 0 67,748 Legal Services Joint Svc Legal Assistant City Attomey 63,230 Joint Svc Legal Legal Assistant 41,679 Joint Svc Legal Savings on Legal Assistant (6,724) Joint Svc Legal Travel & Training 2,500 Joint Svc Legal Dues 500 Joint Svc Legal Savings - Special Services & Legal (15,000) Joint Svc Legal Savings - Municipal Court (32,000) IR Replace Computer Workstations (2) 5,000 Joint Svc Legal Desk & Credenza 996 Joint Svc Legal Desk Chair & Guest Chairs 561 Joint Svc Legal Changing Office Configuration IR Replace Software Licenses 1,100 Joint Svc Legal Phone service 1,000 Census 2000/Redistricting Joint Svc Legal Staff Support Joint Svc Legal Evaluation of census data 8,000 Joint Svc Legal Copy & Food Costs 500 Joint Svc Legal Technical Assistance 10,000 Total Legal Services 72,842 8,500 Note: Costs for personnel include all benefits, supplies, training and capital to place the position in service. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 309 CRITICAL NEEDS (CONT. Note: Costs for personnel include all benefits, supplies, training and capital to place the position in service. REFERENCE 310 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included City Wide HR Svcs Joint Svc city Wide Benefits 200,000 Joint Svc HRAdmin Human Resources Generalist 5,000 44,833 Joint Svc HRAdmin Training 2,000 Joint Svc HRAdmin Computer 2,500 Joint Svc HRAdmin Furniture 700 Joint Svc HRAdmin Adequate Space Joint Svc I HRAdmin I Personnel Records 3,000 Total City wide HR Svcs 205,000 53,033 Total Employee & Organizational Services 205,000 53,033 TOTAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES 277,842 129,281 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Parks 8 Recreation Recreation Rec-SRF Recreation Incentive Pay -Lifeguards 3,000 Rec-SRF Recreation Increase pay - Lifeguards 33,200 Total Recreation 36,200 0 Parks 0 Total Parks 0 0 Total Parks & Recreation Division 36,200 0 Not Fund Dept. Description Included Included Police Services Professional Standards GCP Police Improv County -wide Facility 80,000 Gfund I Police Admin Annual Facility Operations Cost 7,000 Total Professional Standards 87,000 0 0 0 0 Total Police Services 87,000 0 F- Grand Total 962,149 2,399,948 Note: Costs for personnel include all benefits, supplies, training and capital to place the position in service. REFERENCE 310 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 T R A N S F E R F R 0 M Transfers Between Funds TRANSFER TO Interfund transfers include: => Dividend to General Fund: Utility operations have traditionally transferred to the General Fund six percent of its gross billings for utility services and is viewed as a payment of the profits of the fund or a return on investment. The total return on investment transfer to the General Fund is $2,041,025 in 2000/01. => Other Transfers: Transfers to finance various funds for certain operating costs, infrastructure development, grant matching and start-up costs. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 311 General Fund GCP SRF ISF Wastewater Total Out: General Fund 38,026 38,026 SRF 715,000 715,000 ISF 180,000 140,000 320,000_ Electric 2,815,800 2,815,800 Water 833,400 80,000 54,000 621,000 825,450 2,413,850 Wastewater 286,300 286,300 Stormwater Drainage 43,550 55,000 98,550 Sanitation 142,450 142,450 Total In: 4,121,500 795,000 272,026 816,000 825,450 6,829,976 Interfund transfers include: => Dividend to General Fund: Utility operations have traditionally transferred to the General Fund six percent of its gross billings for utility services and is viewed as a payment of the profits of the fund or a return on investment. The total return on investment transfer to the General Fund is $2,041,025 in 2000/01. => Other Transfers: Transfers to finance various funds for certain operating costs, infrastructure development, grant matching and start-up costs. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 311 Internal Service Premiums Joint Facilities Information Department Maintenance Fleet Services Services General General Fund General Government 5,363 1,124,389 City Council 3,516 City Manager's Office 28,519 3,170 17,581 Municipal Court 15,598 Development Support 24,739 3,571 19,810 Development Process Team 34,120 26,414 Inspection Services 33,017 Community Svcs Admin 6,634 11,795 Animal Services 700 16,019 27,521 Parks 31,340 76,545 18,761 Recreation 71,495 8,045 25,014 Library 50,416 82,562 Fire Services Administration 61,704 11,616 Fire Prevention 17,580 14,520 Fire Suppression 193,813 104,546 Police Administration 57,329 9,283 13,924 Professional Standards 5,347 10,443 Special Operations 56,462 27,847 Patrol Services 287,970 125,312 Information Management 55,694 Ecomonic Development & Tourism SRF Economic Development Admin 3,532 2,621 Main Street 3,532 2,621 Convention & Visitors Bureau 3,532 4,603 2,621 Parks SRF Parks 42,053 4,707 25,014 Streets SRF 153,657 13,652 207,268 Streets PID SRF 29,500 Parks Fleet Management Fund Vehicle Service Center 562 13,447 3,900 Joint Services Fund COU Administration 30,658 3,067 17,065 Systems Engineering 7,833 6,826 Pump Maintenance 43,915 23,891 Finance Administration 7,799 Accounting 19,498 Purchasing 40,571 7,781 23,398 Utility Office 10,307 27,297 Employee & Organizational Svcs 6,894 .18,232 EOS City Wide Services 10,578 Safety Service 3,636 7,293 Legal Services 14,986 17,804 Facilities Maintenance Fund Facilities Maintenance Services 3,431 REFERENCE 312 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Total 543,813 1,339,166 940,710 3,741,476 929,714 Internal Service Fund premiums include: * Facilities Maintenance Contracts and repairs for buildings and grounds are charged to departments based on actual usage and charges. * Fleet Vehicle lease fees are charged to departments based on actual replacement costs. Maintenance fees are charged based on each department's prior year actual usage. * Information Resources Computer and software lease fees are charged to departments based on replacement costs and estimated usage. * Joint Services & General (nondepartment) Fees are charged to funds receiving administrative services from another fund based on a reasonable, rational basis. The following factors are used as applicable. * relative revenues * relative personnel * number of utility accounts * number of work orders * number of requisitions REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 313 Facilities Information Joint Department Maintenance Fleet Services Services General Information Services Fund Information Resources 16,238 3,428 30,799 Electric Fund Electric Operations 127,166 17,065 Electric Contracts 733,812 459,299 Water Fund Water Distribution 72,810 6,826 Plant Management 12,520 Water Contracts 789,684 179,146 Wastewater Fund Wastewater Collection 57,155 10,239 Plant Management 12,520 Wastewater Contracts 574,412 118,873 Sanitation Fund Collection Station 10,681 Sanitation Contracts 108,738 66,865 Stormwater Drainage Fund Stormwater Drainage 58,484 6,826 172,539 40,879 Airport Fund Airport Operations 2,938 16,093 3,932 30,634 64,652 Total 543,813 1,339,166 940,710 3,741,476 929,714 Internal Service Fund premiums include: * Facilities Maintenance Contracts and repairs for buildings and grounds are charged to departments based on actual usage and charges. * Fleet Vehicle lease fees are charged to departments based on actual replacement costs. Maintenance fees are charged based on each department's prior year actual usage. * Information Resources Computer and software lease fees are charged to departments based on replacement costs and estimated usage. * Joint Services & General (nondepartment) Fees are charged to funds receiving administrative services from another fund based on a reasonable, rational basis. The following factors are used as applicable. * relative revenues * relative personnel * number of utility accounts * number of work orders * number of requisitions REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 313 ORDINANCE NO. - Z/Y AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN, TEXAS, ADOPTING THE CENTURY PLAN - ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT FOR THE ENSUING FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2000, AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2001, IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 102, LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE; APPROPRIATING THE VARIOUS AMOUNTS THEREOF; ADOPTING THE ANNUAL AMENDMENT TO THE CENTURY PLAN; ADOPTING COUNCIL AMENDMENTS; REPEALING CONFLICTING ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS; INCLUDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the City Charter of the City of Georgetown, Texas, was amended by vote of the people in April, 1986 such that comprehensive planning was established as a continuous and ongoing governmental function; and WHEREAS, the City Council did, on March 8, 1988, adopt by Ordinance Number 880097 the Georgetown Century Plan - Policy Plan as the Comprehensive Plan for the City pursuant to Section 1.08 of the City Charter; and WHEREAS, Chapter 4 -Administration of the Policy Plan establishes the means of implementing, revising, and amending adopted elements of the Century Pfan; and WHEREAS, the City Manager of the City of Georgetown has submitted to the City Council a proposed Annual Operating Plan element ("Plan") of the Century Plan of the revenues of said City and expenses of conducting the affairs thereof and providing a complete financial plan for the ensuing fiscal year, beginning October 1, 2000, and ending September 30, 2001, and which said Proposed Plan has been compiled from detailed information obtained from the several departments and offices of the City; and WHEREAS, the City Council has received said City Manager's Proposed Plan and a copy of such Proposed Plan and all supporting schedules have been filed with the City Secretary of the City of Georgetown; and WHEREAS, in accordance with Section 102.006 of the Texas Local Government Code, a public hearing was held on August 22, 2000 concerning such Proposed Plan; and such hearing was held giving all interested taxpayers an opportunity to be heard for or against any item or amount therein; and 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan Ordinance No. aDDO— T Page 1 of 4 P:IAGENDA\2 OMUDGEI1Budget Adoption Ordinance.doc WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Georgetown is of the opinion that the Proposed Plan should be approved and adopted as the City's Annual Operating Plan element as amended for the ensuing fiscal year; and WHEREAS, the City Council has reviewed all adopted ends, means, and Functional Plans - to develop the Proposed Plan and adoption of the Annual Operating Plan shall constitute an Annual Amendment to those elements; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN, TEXAS, THAT: SECTION 1. The facts and recitations contained in the preamble of this ordinance are hereby found and declared to be true and correct, and are incorporated by reference herein and expressly made a part hereof, as if copied verbatim. The City Council hereby finds that this ordinance implements the following policy of the Century Plan - Policy Plan Element: 1. Finance Policy End 14.0, which states: "All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future needs are provided", and further finds that the enactment of this Ordinance is not inconsistent or in conflict with any other Century Plan Policies, as required by Section 2.03 of the Administrative Chapter of the Policy Plan. SECTION 2. The Proposed Plan of the revenues of the City of Georgetown and expenses of conducting the affairs thereof, providing a fmancial plan for the ensuing fiscal year beginning October 1, 2000, and ending September 30, 2001, as submitted to the City Council by the City Manager of said City, and the same is in all things adopted and approved as amended per Exhibit "B" as the Annual Operating Plan of the current revenues and expenses as well as fixed charges against said City for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2000, and ending September 30, 2001. Exhibit "A" is the Plan distributed to Council members August 17, 2000, incorporated by reference herein. 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan Ordinance No. C?000 Page 2 of 4 P:\AGENDA\2000\13UDGET\13udget Adoption Ordinance.doc SECTION 3. The amounts indicated for the following funds are hereby appropriated for payments of expenditures and payments of the individual funds: Fund Appropriations Airport Fund $ 1,538,732 General Debt Service 1,887,462 Electric Funds 22,822,497 Facilities Maintenance Fund 608,953 Fleet Management Fund 1,430,101 General Capital Projects 7,384,193 General Fund 13,623,547 Information Services Fund 1,122,959 Joint Services Fund 4,708,029 Sanitation Fund 2,581,329 Special Revenue Funds 4,562,950 Stormwater Drainage Funds 1,308,978 Wastewater Funds 11,488,792 Water Funds 10,334,049 Total for 2000/01 $85,402,571 SECTION 4. Adoption of this ordinance authorizes the City Manager to transfer monies set aside for salary adjustments and employee merit increases in the Emploryee & Organizational Services department to other departments as needed for these purposes. SECTION 5. Adoption of this Ordinance shall constitute the Annual Amendment to the following adopted functional plan elements and shall establish a new effective date for these elements: Airport Master Plan Land Intensity Plan Parks and Recreation Plan Economic Development Strategic Plan Facilities and Services Plan Urban Design Plan Transportation and Utilities Plan SECTION 6. All ordinances and resolutions, or parts of ordinances and resolutions, in conflict with this Ordinance are hereby repealed, and are no longer of any force and effect. 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan Ordinance No. 0?00 TT Page 3 of 4 PAAGENDAMOMBUDGET\Budget Adoption Ordinance.doc SECTION 7. If any provision of this Ordinance or application thereof to any person or circumstance, shall be held invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the other provisions, or application thereof, of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this Ordinance are hereby declared to be severable. SECTION 8. The Mayor is hereby authorized to sign this Ordinance and the City Secretary to attest. This Ordinance shall become effective upon adoption of its second and final reading by the City Council of the City of Georgetown, Texas. PASSED AND APPROVED on First Reading on the 12th day of September, 2000. PASSED AND APPROVED on Second Reading on the 26th day of September, 2000 ATTEST: THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN: Sandra Lee City Secretary APPROVED AS TO FORM: Marianne Landers Banks City Attorney 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan Ordinance No. 07000 — a Page 4 of 4 P:\AGENDA\2000\BUDGET\Budget Adoption Ordinance.doc By: MaryEllen Kersch Mayor ORDINANCE NUMBER 4000 — 415 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CITY OF GEORGETOWN, CODE OF ORDINANCES § 2.08.010 ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS AND DEPARTMENTS; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND SETTING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the City Council has reviewed the proposed 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan Element of the Georgetown Century Plan and the Administrative Division and Department revisions contained therein; and WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Georgetown, Texas deems it necessary to amend § 2.08.010 of the City of Georgetown Code of Ordinances entitled "Administration", "Administrative Divisions and Departments". NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN, TEXAS, THAT: SECTION 1. The facts and recitations contained in the preamble of this ordinance are hereby found and declared to be true and correct, and are incorporated by reference herein and expressly made a part hereof, as if copied verbatim. The City Council hereby finds that this ordinance implements the following policy of the Century Plan - Policy Plan Element: 1. Finance Policy End 14.0, which states: "All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future needs are provided", and further finds that the enactment of this ordinance is not inconsistent or in conflict with any other Century Plan Policies, as required by Section 2.03 of the Administrative Chapter of the Policy Plan. SECTION 2. The City of Georgetown Code of Ordinances, Chapter 2, Administration, § 2.08.010, Administrative Divisions and Departments, is hereby amended to read as follows: § 2.08.010. Administrative Divisions and Departments. There are hereby established the following administrative divisions and departments of the City: Amend Divisions/Departments 2000/01 Ordinance No. a00D TS Page 1 of 3 P:\AGENDAk2000\BUDGET'\Budgct-Admin Div-Dcpt.doc Community Owned Utilities Division: Administration Energy Services (Electric) Pump Maintenance Systems Engineering Transportation Services (Stormwater Drainage & Streets) Water Services (Wastewater & Water) Community Services Division: Administration General Government Contracts Airport Animal Services Public Library Sanitation Development Services Division: Development Process Team Development Support Inspection Services Economic Development Division: Administration Convention & Visitors Bureau Main Street Finance and Administration Division: Accounting Administration Facilities Maintenance (including Internal Service Fund) Fleet Management (including Internal Service Fund) Municipal Court Purchasing & Properties Utility Office Fire Services Division: Administration Operations Prevention & Community Analysis Information Resources Division: Information Resources Operations (including Internal Service Fund) Amend Divisions/Departments 2000/01 Ordinance No. 0200o — vs - Page 2 of 3 s- Page2of3 P:tAGENDAk2IX10�BUDGE'RBudget-Admin Div-Dept.doe Management Services Division: City Council City Manager's Office Legal Services Employee & Organizational Services Safety Services Parks and Recreation Services: Parks (Cemetery) Recreation Police Services Division: Organizational & Administrative Services Information Management Patrol Services Professional Standards Special Operations SECTION 3. In the event any section, paragraph, subdivision, clause, phrase, provision sentence or part of this ordinance or the application of same to any person or circumstance shall for any reason be adjudged invalid or held unconstitutional, by a court of competent jurisdiction, it shall not affect, impair, or invalidate the remainder of this ordinance which shall be given full force and effect. SECTION 4. This ordinance shall become effective October 1, 2004 upon adoption by the City Council of the City of Georgetown, Texas. PASSED AND APPROVED on First Reading on the 12th day of September, 2000. PASSED AND APPROVED on Second Reading on the 26th day of September, 2000. ATTEST: Sandra D. Lee City Secretary APPROVED AS TO FORM: X� L% Marianne Landers Banks City Attorney THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN: v By: aryEllen Kersch Mayor Amend Divisions/Departments 2000/01 Ordinance No. "?000 — 5/5 Page 3 of 3 P'\AGENDA0000\BUDGETBudget-Admin Div-Dcpt.do ORDINANCE NUMBER 4000 — 4 AN ORDINANCE LEVYING A TAX RATE FOR THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN FOR THE TAX YEAR 2000; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND SETTING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. WHEREAS, the City of Georgetown, Texas is an incorporated Home Rule city dependent upon taxes to provide its citizens with services; and WHEREAS, the City of Georgetown, Texas published the required notice on August 13, 2000; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds it necessary to levy taxes for the 2000/01 fiscal year for the City of Georgetown, Texas; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN, TEXAS, THAT: SECTION 1. The facts and recitations contained in the preamble of this ordinance are hereby found and declared to be true and correct, and are incorporated by reference herein and expressly made a part hereof, as if copied verbatim. The City Council hereby finds that this ordinance implements the following policy of the Century Plan - Policy Plan Element: 1. Finance Policy End 14.0, which states: "All municipal operations are conducted in an efficient business -like manner and sufficient financial resources for both current and future needs are provided", and further finds that the enactment of this ordinance is not inconsistent or in conflict with any other Century Plan Policies, as required by Section 2.03 of the Administrative Chapter of the Policy Plan. SECTION 2. The City Council of the City of Georgetown (the "City Council") hereby finds that all of the prerequisites to the levying of a tax rate for this City for the year 2000, (including, without limitation, certifications, notices, submittals, and public hearings) as required by law have been complied with. Levy Tax Rate 2000/01 Ordinance No. 0( 000 — �{O Page 1 of 2 P. UGENDd 1200018UDGMBudget Tai Lny.ORD.dop• SECTION 3. The City Council does hereby levy and adopt the tax rate on $100 valuation for the tax year 2000 as follows: $.19847 for the purpose of maintenance and operation $.11562 for the principal and interest on debt of this city $.31409 total tax rate SECTION 4. If any section, paragraph, clause, phrase, or provision of this Ordinance shall be adjudged invalid or held unconstitutional, the same shall not affect the validity of this Ordinance as a whole or any part or provision thereof other than the part so declared to be invalid or unconstitutional. SECTION 5. This Ordinance shall become effective upon adoption of its second and final reading by the City Council of the City of Georgetown, Texas. PASSED AND APPROVED on First Reading on the 12th day of September, 2000. PASSED AND APPROVED on Second Reading on the 26th day of September, 2000. ATTEST: Sandra Lee City Secretary APPROVED AS TO FORM: Marianne Landers Banks City Attorney Levy Tax Rate 2000/01 Ordinance No. 0200 V4P Page 2 of 2 P.•1AGENDA120001BUDGEnAudgei Ta Ley.ORD.doq THE CITY OF GEORGETOWN: By: �MaryEllen Kersch Mayor ExECUrNE SUMMARY Budget and financial policies are an important part of a city's budget process and implementation. These policies provide guidance for staff (executive limitations) and state the Council's intent on how the City's finances will be managed (Ends). The following policies represent conservative and sound financial management of the City while providing staff with appropriate flexibility to accomplish our Means. SIGNIFICANT CHANGES: Section 1.1 Budget Adoption. Quarterly financial update reports will now be provided to Council. Section 1.8 Contingency Account. The budget includes $150,000 for the Contingency Account within the General Fund and an additional $86,000 set aside in the Streets SFR Fund. Section 2.7 Cash Management & Investments - Authorized Investments. This section summarizes the City Investment Policy. The last revision to that policy, adopted by Council in March 2000, added Flex Repo as an e�y authorized investment. FT Section 4.2 Contingency Reserves. (1) For 2000/01, direct costs for purchased power for the City's electric utility customers have been eliminated from the Contingency calculation because the power is only purchased when demanded by customers and its high collection rate on its utility accounts (over 99.5%). The City believes it can justify reducing these costs from total operating expenses which must be covered by contingency reserves. The reserve balance will remain $8.5 million for 2000/01. Section 5.3 Debt Coverage Ratio. The City has a commitment to maintain coverage ratios by fund. This budget meets the 1.5 times coverage goal. The projected coverage 2000/01 is 3.36 times debt service. Section 6.4.1 Capitalization Policy. For 2000/01, the capitalization point is increased from $800 to $1,000. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 323 BUDGET & FINANCIAL POLICIES TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1: BUDGET 1.1 Budget Adoption 1.2 Budget Basis of Accounting 1.3 Budget Transfers, Amendments, Emergency Appropriations 1.4 Budget Expenditure Categories 1.5 Budget Expenditure Authorization & Responsibility 1.6 Fiscal Deficit 1.7 Compliance of Budget with the Century Plan 1.8 Council Contingency Section 2: CASH MANAGEMENT &INVESTMENTS 2.1 General 2.2 Statement of Cash Management Philosophy 2.3 Objectives 2.4 Safekeeping and Custody 2.5 Standard of Care and Reporting 2.6 Investment Strategies 2.7 Authorized Investments Section 3: CAPITAL 3.1 Capital Asset/Infrastructure Purchases and Replacement 3.2 Capital Improvement Policy Section 4: CONTINGENCY RESERVES 4.1 Purpose 4.2 Minimum Reserves 4.3 Investment of Reserves Section 5: DEBT 5.1 Debt Policy 5.2 Debt Reserves 5.3 Debt Coverage Ratio 5.4 Bond Elections Section 6: FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING 6.1 Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) 6.2 Organization of Funds 6.3 Audit of Accounts 6.4 Capitalization Policy 6.5 Pensions 6.6 Performance Pay Plan Section 7: INTERFUND TRANSFERS 7.1 Interfund Charges 7.2 Joint Indirect Revenues 7.3 Transfers Section 8: REVENUE REFERENCE 324 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 BUDGET & FINANCIAL POLICIES The City Council of the City of Georgetown is committed to sound financial planning and direction relating to the 2000/01 Annual Operating Plan Element of the City of Georgetown Century Plan. As part of that commitment, the City will adopt Budget and Financial Policies as part of the Annual Operating Plan. These policies will be reviewed and updated annually as part of the budget preparation process. SECTION 1: BUDGET 1.1 BUDGET ADOPTION The City of Georgetown Charter provides for a council-manager form of government. Article V, § 5.02 outlines the powers and duties of the City Manager and grants to him the responsibility for "...the proper administration of all the affairs of the City ... To perform such other duties as may be prescribed by this Charter or required by the Council, not inconsistent with the provisions of this Charter". Article VI, § 6.02 further provides: "At least thirty (30) days prior to the end of each fiscal year the City Manager shall submit to the Council a proposed budget presenting a complete financial plan for the ensuing fiscal year. The budget shall be finally adopted not later than the twenty-seventh day of the last month of the fiscal year. Should the Council take no final action on or prior to such day the budget, as submitted, shall be deemed to have been finally adopted by the Council. No budget shall be adopted or appropriations made unless the total of estimated revenues, income and funds available shall be equal to or in excess of such budget or appropriations, except as otherwise provided in this Article." The City Manager will present a mid -year performance and financial status report to the City Council within 60 days following the end second fiscal quarter. Quarterly update reports will also be provided within 30 days of the end of the fiscal quarter. 1.2 BUDGET BASIS OF ACCOUNTING The Charter provides that "the several amounts stated (in the budget) shall be and become appropriated to the several objects and purposes named therein ... At the close of each fiscal year, any unencumbered balance of an appropriation shall revert to the fund from which appropriated and become available forreappropriation for the next fiscal year." In practice, the Article is interpreted to mean that encumbered amounts at year-end are reappropriated in the subsequent fiscal year if not fulfilled. To be eligible for carry forward andreappropriation to a subsequent year, the goods or services must be or have been both ordered in good faith and appropriated in the year encumbered. The Charter also has been interpreted to require that budgeted ending fund or working capital balances be equivalent to those calculated using GAAP in the City's annual audit. This means that for some expenditures, a cash basis -like method of accounting is applied for proprietary fund types (utility, airport and internal service funds). For instance, capital outlay and debt principle reduction are budgeted, even though excluded in the determination of net income, on the basis of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). On the other hand, bad debt expense is budgeted in the utility funds even though it is not a cash basis expense. REFERENCE __. ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 325 1.3 BUDGET TRANSFERS, AMENDMENTS, EMERGENCY APPROPRIATIONS After the effective date of the budget, unencumbered appropriations may be transferred to other expenditure accounts. Article VI, § 6.03 of the Charter provides: "The Council may transfer any unencumbered appropriation balance or portion thereof from one division, office, department, or agency to another at any time. The City Manager shall have authority, without Council approval, to transfer appropriation balances from one expenditure account to another within a single division, office, department or agency of the City." The Charter, in Article VI, § 6.04 provides a mechanism for budget amendments and emergency appropriations. It states: "The Council may authorize, a vote by a majority plus one, an emergency expenditure as an amendment to the original budget only in a case of grave public necessity to meet an unusual and unforeseen condition that could not have been included in the original budget through the use of reasonable diligent thought and attention. Such amendments shall be made by the Council after giving legal notice as specified in Texas State law. If the Council amends the original budget to meet an emergency, the Council shall file a copy of its order or resolution amending the budget with the City Secretary and the Secretary shall attach the copy to the original budget. After the adoption of the budget or a budget amendment, the budget officer shall provide for the filing of a true copy of the approved budget or amendment in the office of the County Clerk of Williamson County." 1.4 BUDGET EXPENDITURE CATEGORIES In recent years, the City Council of the City of Georgetown has considered and approved three total categories of expenditures for each departmental budget rather than "line by line" expenditure budgets. The three expenditure categories are personnel services, operations and capital. "Personnel services" include all personnel costs of the department, including salaries, overtime, longevity, workers compensation and employee taxes and benefits. "Operations" cover the daily costs of operating the department - office and other supplies, maintenance, utilities, outside contractor or professional services, transfers out, vehicle lease costs, etc. "Capital" expenditures typically include expenditures for tangible assets costing over $500 with a life exceeding one year. Excluded from such departmental "capital" budgets are expenditures of the general and utility capital projects funds that are budgeted on a project basis. These latter expenditures usually relate to infrastructure improvements. Internal expenditure reporting is prepared and monitored on a detailed, line by line basis within each expenditure category. 1.5 BUDGET EXPENDITURE AUTHORIZATION & RESPONSIBILITY Each Division Director, appointed by the City Manager, will be responsible for the administration of his/her departmental budget. This includes accomplishing the Means adopted as part of the Annual Operating Plan and monitoring each department budget for compliance with spending limitations. Division Directors may transfer funds within departments within budget expenditure categories (personnel services, operations, capital) without approval of the City Manager or Council. All other transfers or amendments require Council or City Manager approval as outlined in section 1.3. 1.6 FISCAL DEFICIT The Charter provides "that should the unappropriated and unencumbered revenues, income and available funds of the City for such fiscal year not be sufficient to meet the expenditures under the appropriations authorized by the Charter, thereby creating a deficit, it shall be the duty of the Council to include the amount of such deficit in its budget for the following fiscal year, and said deficit shall be paid off and discharged during the said following fiscal year." REFERENCE 326 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 In practice, deficit has been interpreted to mean City funds as a whole. Council may choose from time to time to allow individual funds to have a deficit balance as long as Contingency Reserve requirements for the city as a whole are maintained. 1.7 COMPLIANCE OF BUDGET WITH THE CENTURY PLAN The Charter provides that "the City Council establish comprehensive planning as a continuous and ongoing governmental function in order to promote and strengthen the existing role, processes and powers of the City of Georgetown through... the process of comprehensive planning and the preparation, adoption and implementation of a comprehensive plan, the City intends to preserve, promote, protect and improve the public health, safety, comfort, order, appearance, convenience and general welfare; prevent the overcrowding of land and avoid undue concentration or diffusion of population or land uses; facilitate the adequate and efficient provision of transportation, water, wastewater, schools, parks, recreational facilities, housing and other facilities and services; and conserve, develop, utilize and protect natural resources." The "Century Plan" is the result of the Charter required comprehensive plan. Written by a broad based group of citizens, the Century Plan is the City's master and general plan. To date, the Policy Plan and seven functional elements have been adopted. The "Ends" identified in this operating budget are all taken from adopted Century Plan documents. The Century Plan provides that "The Century Plan shall be utilized as a primary and integral tool in preparing a three part Annual Budget for the city with five-, two-, and one-year time horizons. Identification, selection, prioritization, approval and funding of City programs, projects and work activities shall be based upon the adopted policies, goals, objectives and functional plan elements which comprise the Century Plan. The City staff and elected and appointed officials involved in the preparation of the Annual Budget shall rely upon the Century Plan to provide direction and guidance for their recommending and authorizing the expenditure of City controlled funds. In no instance shall City controlled funds, equipment, staff or efforts be used in a manner which is inconsistent or in conflict with, or contrary to the Century Plan. "The preparation of budgets with multiple time horizons shall be used to ensure that the activities, programs, and projects required by the policies, goals, objectives, and functional plan elements of the Century Plan are included within both the short and long range work programs of the appropriate City Division. The five-year portion of the budget shall identify and prioritize the activities which must be conducted within a five-year time frame to fulfill the requirements of the Century Plan. It shall also estimate the costs and identify funding sources of these activities. The two-year budget shall be prepared to further detail and clarify the proper sequencing and scope of activities in the five-year budget. This budget will refine the costs and funding estimates as appropriate for the shorter time frame. The one-year budget will be prepared within the context of the five- and two- year budgets in order to ensure that annual progress is made to accomplish the Century Plan programs, projects and work activities in the proper sequence, to the appropriate extent, and commensurate with available resources. It will identify specific projects, and their costs and funding sources to be carried out within the following year by the appropriate City Division. "The City shall maintain and annually update each of these budgets pursuant to this Chapter in order to program the various fiscal requirements of the Century Plan." REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 327 1.8 CONTINGENCY ACCOUNT The budget may include contingency appropriations. During the budget year, actual expenditures from these appropriated amounts shall be specifically approved by the City Council. Council approval is on an item -by -item basis for proposed expenditures which, at the time of budget approval, were not expected or anticipated. The Contingency Account for 2000/01 is $150,000 included in theWatay General Fund and $86,000 in the Streets SRF Fund. SECTION 2: CASH MANAGEMENT & INVESTMENTS 2.1 General. The City Council has formally approved a separate Investment Policy ("thePolicy") for the City of Georgetown that meets the requirements of the Public Funds Investment Act, Section 2256 of the Texas Local Government Code. The Policy, which is reviewed annually by the City Council and applies to all financial assets held by the City, is summarized below. 2.2 Statement of Cash Management Philosophy. The City of Georgetown shall maintain a comprehensive cash management program to include the effective collection of all accounts receivable, the prompt deposit of receipts to the City's bank accounts, the payment of obligations so as to comply with state law and in accord with vendor invoices, and the prudent investment of idle funds in accord with this policy. 2.3 Objectives. The City's investment program shall be conducted so as to accomplish the following objectives listed in priority order: Safety of the Principal invested; 2. Availability (liquidity) of sufficient cash to pay obligations of the City when they are due; and Investment of idle cash at the highest possible rate of return (yield), consistent with state and local laws and the objectives of safety and availability (yield) listed above. 2.4 Safekeeping and Custody. Investments may only be purchased through brokers/dealers who meet the criteria detailed in the Policy. Internal controls, authorized financial institutions, safekeeping and collateralization are also addressed in detail in the Policy. 2.5 Standard of Care and Reporting. Investments will be made with judgment and care that persons of prudence, discretion, and intelligence exercise in the management of their own affairs in similar circumstances, considering the safety of their capital and probable income to be derived. Those persons involved in the investment process will refrain from personal business activity that could be considered a conflict of interest. The Director of Finance and Administration is responsible for the overall management of the City's investment program and ensures all investments are made consistent with the Policy, maintains current information on investments and presents a quarterly investment report to City Council. The expectations of the contents of the quarterly reports are detailed in the Policy. 2.6 Investment Strategies. The Policy provides specific direction for investing the different types of City funds: Operating Funds, Contingency Reserves, Debt Reserves, Interest and Sinking Funds, and Bond Proceeds (Capital Improvement Funds). The strategies for each type of fund address the funds' cash flow needs, legal requirements and diversity guidelines for investing. REFERENCE 328 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 2.7 Authorized Investments: City of Georgetown funds may be invested in the following investments: 1. Certificates of Deposit issued by the City's Depository/Depositories. All certificates of deposit - in excess of the FDIC insured amount must be collateralized, with collateral being held by a third party. 2. U.S. Treasuries and Agencies defined as obligations of the United States of America, its agencies and instrumentalities. 3. Investment Pools that meet the following criteria: a. Provide an offering circular or other similar disclosure instruments and provide monthly and transaction reporting. b. Investment in a new pool requires the approval of the City Council. c. A public funds investment pool created to function as a money market mutual fund that (1) marks its portfolio to market daily, (2) includes in its investment objectives the maintenance of a stable net asset value of $1 for each share and (3) be continuously rated no lower than AAA or at an equivalent rating by a nationally recognized rating service. 4. Money Market Mutual Funds. No-load money market mutual funds if the fund: a. Is regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission; b. Marks its portfolio to market daily; c. Includes in its investment objectives the maintenance of a stable net asset value of $1 for each share; d. Has a dollar -weighted average stated maturity of 90 days or fewer; e. Is continuously rated no lower than AAA or at an equivalent rating by a nationally recognize rating service. 5. Repurchase Agreements. Fully collateralized repurchase agreements that: a. Have a defined termination date; b. Are secured by obligations as allowed by the PFIA and this policy; c. Require third party safekeeping of all securities prior to the release of any funds; d. Are placed through a primary dealer or financial institution doing business in this state; and e. Do not create a reverse repurchase agreement by the City. f. Construction, capital improvement and bond proceed funds may utilize a flexible repurchase —" agreement that allows expenditure -related withdrawal of funds, without penalty, with an average - life and termination date limitation based on the anticipated draw schedule. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 329 6. Other investments as approved by the City Council and not prohibited by law. SECTION 3: CAPITAL 3.1 CAPITAL ASSEVINFRASTRUCTURE PURCHASES AND REPLACEMENT 3.1.1 General. In order to ensure long-term financial stability for the City and maintain its infrastructure, the City continues to pursue a "pay as you go" policy for capital asset purchases. The City of Georgetown has traditionally funded capital asset purchases and replacement from current revenues or reserves where possible. Capital projects are funded from bond issuance when: (1) the Debt Policy criteria are met, (2) deferment of the project is not in the best interest of the infrastructure system or the community, and (3) current revenues and reserves are not available. 3.1.2 Internal Service Funds. All rolling stock, facility maintenance and computer purchases are made by Internal Service Funds. Assessments are made to the using funds for the use of equipment currently in use and to be purchased during the year. The Internal Service Funds purchase replacement assets from lease revenues received from other funds. In this way, suitable funds are available for the purchase of rolling stock, computers and building maintenance and repair without the issuance of debt. The purpose of the funds are to maintain and replace existing assets. Additional equipment is proposed with all other funding requests considered during the budget process. 3.13 Street Maintenance and Repair. In order to maintain the street and bridge structure within the City, the City will contribute $.05 per $100 valuation of property tax rates to the Streets Capital Improvement Projects Fund each year. This funding is in addition to operations costs of the Street Department. The schedule will be reviewed each year for appropriateness of funding amounts and variations in property valuations and tax rates. Most of the City's main thoroughfares are part of the State of Texas' highway system and are maintained by the State. Most improvements to these highways are paid for by the State with the City contributing 10% - 50% of the construction costs and purchasing right-of-way when necessary. It is the policy of the City to provide matching funds for these projects in addition to the dedicated property tax outlined above. 3.1.4 Utility Infrastructure. Each utility fund (electric, stormwater drainage, wastewater, water) uses amounts available from within its fund to finance the repair, enhancement and expansion of each system's infrastructure. The financing may include unreserved, unencumbered fund balances, current revenues or debt proceeds. The City will maintain the infrastructure of each system in order to provide for excellent services to customers, growth of the system and compliance with state and federal regulations. 3.1.5 Municipal Airport. The Airport Fund uses amounts available in its fund balance to fund capital improvements to the Georgetown Airport. The Federal Aviation Agency typically pays 90% of such costs with 10% paid by the Airport Fund. REFERENCE 330 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 3.2 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT POLICY The City of Georgetown annually updates and adopts a five year Capital Improvements Project (CIP) Schedule as part of the operating budget adoption process. The Capital Improvements Projects generally consist of infrastructure and related construction and do not include small capital items such as furniture, equipment and vehicles. The schedules consolidate the capital spending priorities for all operating activities of the City. This includes general government activities, such as street and bridge construction, park development, police, fire and recreation facilities; and enterprise activities, such as electric transmission and distribution facilities, water treatment plants, towers, distribution and transmission facilities, wastewater interception, collection systems, and treatment facilities, stormwater drainage improvements, and other requirements to provide services to the citizens. The CIP Schedules are included as one part of the annual operating budget. The first year of the list becomes the capital budget for the approved budget year. The City intends to develop and implement a program for soliciting citizen involvement and participation to formulate capital improvements planned through involvement fromcitizens advisory boards. The development of a capital improvement program should be segregated into two components: (1) those staff recommended projects for which specific funding sources have already been identified and (2) those staff recommended projects for which funding sources have not been identified. The City of Georgetown will operate under the following capital improvement policy. A. The City will make all capital improvements in accordance with the adopted capital improvement program. B. The City will identify the estimated cost and funding sources for each capital project requested before it is submitted to the City Council. C. The City will use inter -governmental assistance to finance only those capital improvements that are consistent with the capital improvement plan and City priorities and whose operating and maintenance costs have been included in the operating budget. D. The City will require developer contributions where ever possible for system expansions. SECTION 4: CONTINGENCY RESERVES L•�i�ll�'� Z�Z.9� The City of Georgetown will maintain budgeted minimum contingency reserves in the ending working capital/fund balances in order to provide: 1. A secure, healthy financial base for the City in case of natural disaster or other emergencies. 2. Flexibility and stability for rates, should actual revenues fall short of budgeted revenues. 3. Available resources to implement budgeted expenditures without regard to the actual revenue stream (cash flow) of the fund. REFERENCE _ _ ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 331 For reserve calculation purposes, working capital is defined as the balance of current unrestricted assets less current unrestricted liabilities. 4.2 NE NIMUM RESERVES The City will maintain contingency reserves at a minimum of 75 days (20.83%) of net budgeted operating expenditures. (See reserve calculation for 2000/01 last page of this section). Net budgeted operating expenditure is defined as total budgeted expenditures less interfund transfers and charges, payments for tax -supported debt proceeds, direct cost for purchased power, and payments from third party grant monies. Previously, purchased power was included in the contingency calculation. Since purchased power is sold as soon as it is received, the City has elected, after consultation with financial advisors and bond rating consultants, to eliminate these costs within this calculation. The City has chosen not to reduce previously existing contingency balances for 2000/01. The reserves will be maintained by fund as follows: General Fund Wastewater Fund Water Fund Stormwater Drainage Fund Streets Special Revenue Fund Airport Fund Electric Fund Convention & Visitors Bureau Fund 60 days or 16.67% 90 days or 25.00% 90 days or 25.00% 50,000 As funds are available, up to 60 days or 16.67% As funds are available, up to 90 days or 25.00% As needed to meet 75 -day City-wide requirement 75 days or 20.83% For all other non -enterprise funds, the fund balance is an indication of the balance of each particular fund at a specific time. The ultimate goal of each such fund is to have expended the fund balance at the conclusion of the activity for which each fund was established. Thecontingency reserve requirements will be calculated as part of the annual budgeting process and any additional funds required will be included in the appropriations for the proposed budget year. Funds in excess of the minimum reserves may be expended for city purposes at the will of the Council after a finding of fact that the use of the excess reserves will not endanger reserve requirements of future years. 4.3 INVESTMENT OF RESERVES The contingency capital reserve may be invested as provided for in the City's investmentpolicy which includes certain City projects. Each investment must be approved by the City Council. In 1991/92, a thirteen year economic development loan to Tessco, Inc. was made from these funds. In August 1998, this loan was transferred to C3 Communications when that company assumed the lease on the building. Beginning in 1993/94, a $600,000 special assessment for the IH -35 Frontage Road construction was included as an investment of this fund balance. In 1995/96, a $135,000 economic development loan to Reedholm Instruments was made. All three investments earn higher rates of return than is currently available through conventional investing, and all provide the City with internally financed economic development projects. Use of fund balance in this manner is consistent with the City's commitment to "pay as you go" for major projects and limit the general obligation and revenue debt incurred by the City. The total of the investment balances and fund balances/working capital reserves for 2000/01 provides the minimum required working capital for the City. REFERENCE 332 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 SECTION 5: DEBT 5.1 DEBT POLICY City staff recommend the use of debt financing when appropriate. It will be judged appropriate when the following conditions exist: (1) non -continuous capital improvements are desired, and (2) future citizens will receive a benefit from the improvement. When the City of Georgetown utilizes long-term financing, it will ensure that the debt is soundly financed by: (1) conservatively projecting the revenue sources that will be utilized to pay the debt, (2) financing the improvement over a period not greater than the useful life of the improvement, and (3) determining that the cost benefit of the improvement including interest costs is positive. 5.2 DEBT RESERVES Debt reserves are established to protect bond holders from payment default. Adequate bond reserves are essential in maintaining good bond ratings and the marketability of bonds. Debt reserves are established by bond ordinance. Revenue bond ordinances require that a reserve equal to the average annual debt service be established. The required reserve for bonds outstanding as of September 30, 2000 is fully funded. 5.3 DEBT COVERAGE RATIO The City will maintain debt service coverage ratios of 1.5 for the utilities as a whole. As a general guideline, each utility fund with debt service requirements should also maintain a coverage ratio of 1.5. The debt coverage ratio will be calculated and reviewed as part of the annual budget process. Debt coverage for 2000/01 is budget at 3.36 times. 5.4 BOND ELECTIONS The guidelines to be used by staff when recommending the use of Certificates of Obligations (CO's) versus voter approved general obligation debt relate to the impact on the property tax rate and the type of projects to be debt funded. CO's When the proposed debt will have no significant impact on future property tax rates, less than 10% tax rate increase, and the projects are within the normal bounds of the City does including roads, parks, utility infrastructure, airport improvements and City facilities. Bond Election When the proposed debt will have a significant impact on the property tax rate, may be controversial even though it is routine in nature, or falls outside the normal bounds of projects the City has typically done. Many of the projects in the latter category will require a bond election by law. SECTION 6: FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING 6.1 GENERALLY ACCEPTED ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES (GAAP) The accounting and budgeting methods and procedures adopted by the City of Georgetown shall conform to generally accepted accounting principles as applied to governmental entities. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 333 6.2 ORGANIZATION OF FUNDS 6.2.1 General. The accounts of the City shall be organized on the basis of funds and account groups, each of which is considered a separate accounting entity. The operations of each fund are accounted for using a separate set of self - balancing accounts that comprise its assets, liabilities, fund equity, revenues, and expenditures or expenses, as appropriate. Governmental resources are allocated to and accounted for in individual funds based upon the purposes for which they are to be spent and the means by which spending activities are controlled. The City of Georgetown uses seven fund groups: General Capital Projects Fund General Debt Service Fund General Fund Enterprise Funds Internal Service Funds Special Revenue Funds Account Groups To assist in the actual day-to-day administration of the City and to determine the true cost of providing each service, the major functions of the City are divided into departments. Salaries and other personnel costs, office and other types of supplies, maintenance and repair costs, as well as the unique expenditures of the department are accounted for by department to provide control of costs. Each department is unique to one fund. Departments are organizationally grouped into divisions. The organizational chart shows the city administration and the organization of departments. 6.2.2 Enterprise Funds. The City currently has six enterprise funds which are supported through user charges. The following funds are enterprise funds of the City: Airport Fund (operating, capital projects and debt service) Electric Fund (operating, capital projects and debt service) Sanitation Fund Stormwater Drainage Fund (operating, capital projects and debt service) Wastewater Fund (operating, capital projects and debt service) Water Fund (operating, capital projects and debt service) 6.2.3 Internal Service Funds. The City currently has four internal service funds which are supported through internal user charges. The following funds are internal service funds of the City: Facilities Maintenance Internal Service Fund Fleet Management Internal Service Fund Joint Services Internal Service Fund Information Services Internal Service Fund 6.2.4 Account Groups. Account Groups are accounting entities used to establish control over and accountability for the government's general fixed assets and the unmatured principal of its general long-term debt, including special assessment debt for which the government is obligated in some manner. The City uses two such account group4 the General Fixed Assets Account Group (GFAAG) and the General Long -Term Debt Account Group (GLTDAG). The long-term portions of claims, judgments, compensated absences and unfunded pension contributions not reported in proprietary or trust funds are also usually reported in the GLTDAG. REFERENCE 334 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Account Groups are dissimilar to funds in that they are not budgeted and are not used to account forsources, uses and balances of expendable available financial resources. 6.3 AUDIT OF ACCOUNTS In accordance with the City Charter, an independent audit of city accounts will be performed every fiscal year. Annual Financial Statements that comply with GFOA Certificate of Achievement standards will be prepared and submitted annually. 6.4 CAPITALIZATION POLICY 6.4.1 General. For purposes of budgeting and accounting classification, the following criteria must be met for an expenditure to be considered as capital outlay: A. The expenditure must be made for an asset which the City will own. B. The expenditure must purchase an asset with an expected useful life of longer than one year; or extend the life of an asset beyond its original life. C. The asset in question must have a unit cost of34W $1,000 or more. D. The asset acquired must be of a tangible nature. E. The expenditure must not be for a maintenance or repair item. 6.4.2 New Purchases. For new purchases, all costs associated with bringing the asset into working order will be capitalized as part of the asset cost. This shall include freight, installation, start up costs, as well as costs needed to prepare the site to receive the new asset (dirt work, demolition, condemnation costs). Any engineering or consultant type fees may be capitalized as part of the asset cost once the decision or commitment to purchase the asset is made. Feasibility studies needed to help make the decision whether to purchase an asset shall not be capitalized. 6.4.3 Improvements and Replacements. Improvements shall be capitalized when they extend the original life of an asset or when they make the asset more valuable or more productive than it was originally. In the General Fund, the useful life of an asset, except for the modification or rebuilding of major infrastructure assets such as streets, bridges and storm sewers, is considered to be expired when the asset is replaced. The replacement of an asset's components will normally be expensed unless they are of a significant nature and meet all the tests outlined earlier in the general conditions of this policy. Iri the case of major infrastructure assets in all funds, it will be necessary to add the current book value of the asset which is being rebuilt or modified to the cost of its modification or rebuilding in order to obtain the total current value (cost) of the asset. This method of establishing the cost of major infrastructure assets is based on the theory that the cost of rebuilding or modifying an asset which is not fully depreciated does not reflect the total cost of that asset because it does not take into account the cost of site preparation. In proprietary and internal service funds, the aggregate remaining book value of assets sold at auction will be subtracted from each fund's auction proceeds to account for gains and losses on the sale of assets. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 335 6.5 PENSIONS The City of Georgetown is a member of the Texas Municipal Retirement System. Administration of the system is governed by a Board of Directors for the retirement system. The rate of contribution for the City of Georgetown is based upon an annual actuarial analysis for the normal cost and unfunded liability of the number of employees participating in the plan. 6.6 PERFORMANCE PAY PLAN The City's goal as an employer is to attract and keep quality employees. To help accomplish this goal, the City has established for five general objectives: (1) to attract quality employees, (2) to retain quality employees, (3) to operate the City with fewer employees than comparable jurisdictions, (4) to provide an incentive and reward for productivity, and (5) to recognize cost savings generated by productive employees. The City activates the performance pay plan when resources permit. The performance pay plan is fully funded in 2000/01. SECTION 7: INTERFUND TRANSFERS 7.1 INTERFUND CHARGES In accordance with the Century Plan, services provided by a fund are charged to each using fund. Electric, sanitation, stormwater drainage, wastewater and water usage is billed on an actual basis. Charges for services provided have been allocated on a realistic, rational basis. The Joint Services Internal Service Fund charges are paid by using Funds as charges for services. Administrative services provided by the General Fund are likewise billed to using funds as administrative charges. Allocation methods for departmental costsprovided outside of managing funds are shown below. Allocations shall be reviewed for reasonableness as part of the budget preparation process and as part of the mid -year financial and performance report to Council noted in Section 1.1. 7.1.1 General Fund Departments City Council 50% allocated to General/Utilities/Airport, based on relative revenues 50% allocated to General/Utilities/Airport, based on relative personnel Community Services Administration Allocated to General/Sanitation/Airport, based on relative full time equivalent personnel City Manager's Office 50% allocated to General/Utilities, based on relative revenues 50% allocated to GeneraWtilities, based on relative personnel Development Services Allocated to General/Utilities, based on relative personnel Utilities: Electric, Sanitation, Stormwater Drainage, Wastewater and Water. 7.1.2 Joint Services Fund Departments Accounting 50% allocated to General/Utilities/Airport, based on relative revenues 50% allocated to General/Utilities/Airport, based on relative personnel REFERENCE 336 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 COU Administration Allocated to Street Special Revenue Fund/Utilities (excluding Sanitation), based on relative personnel Bad Debts (Utility Office) Allocated to Utilities, based on relative revenue Customer Service Allocated to Water/Electric, based on relative number of accounts Finance Admin. 50% allocated to General/Utilities/Airport, based on relative revenues 50% allocated to General/Utilities/Airport, based on relative personnel Employee & Org. Allocated to General/Utilities/Airport/ Streets Special Revenue Fund, based on relative personnel Services Legal Services Allocated 25% each to General/Utilities, except Sanitation Liability Insurance (EOS) Allocated to General/Utilities/Airport, based on relative revenue Pump Maintenance Allocated to Water/Wastewater Operating, based three year rolling average of work orders Purchasing & Properties Allocated to General/Utilities/Airport/Streets Special Revenue Fund, based on three year rolling average of relative number of requisitions Systems Engineering Allocated 20% each to Streets Special Revenue Fund/Utilities, except Sanitation Utility Office Allocated to Utilities, based on relative number of accounts Utilities: Electric, Sanitation, Stormwater Drainage, Wastewater and Water. 7.1.3 Facilities Maintenance Internal Service Fund Facilities Maintenance Allocated to departments by facility, based on actual square footage occupied Services Contracts (including repairs) Allocated by building and department, based on actual charges 7.1.4 Fleet Management Internal Service Fund Vehicle Service Center Allocated to departments, based on prior year actual usage Capital Replacement & Insurance Allocated to departments, based on calculated lease charges 7.1.5 Information Services Internal Service Fund Information Resources _ Operations Capital Replacement Allocated to departments, based on estimated usage Allocated to departments, based on calculated lease charges REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 337 7.2 JOINT INDIRECT REVENUES Joint indirect revenues received for electric, sanitation, stormwater drainage, wastewater and water services are allocated on the basis of relative direct billings of the operating funds. Joint indirect revenues allocated in this manner include: Connect Fees Discounts Earned Other Income Penalty Fees Service Fees 73 TRANSFERS The Council may transfer monies from one fund to another as deemed necessary to accomplish the mission of the City. These transfers include, but are not limited to, capital projects funding, debt service requirements,interfund allocations and charges, and balancing requirements. In no event shall the Council transfers for "what it takes to balance" exceed 20% of the revenue sources (total revenues plus unreserved prior year fund balance) of the transferring fund. SECTION 8: REVENUE City staff will review estimated revenue and fee schedules as a part of the budget process. Revenue estimates will be projected to be as accurate as possible using historical and projected data and trends. Any proposed rate increase is based upon fee policies applicable to the fund or activity, the related cost of the serviceprovided, the impact of inflation in the provision of services, and the equitability of comparable fees. REFERENCE 338 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Contingency Reserve Requirements Worksheet (Per Section 4.2 of Budget & Financial Policies BY FUND CITY WIDE General Electric Water Wastewater Total budgeted expenditures 85,402,571 13,623,547 22,822,497 10,334,049 11,488,792 Less: Minimum Minimum Purchased Power- Electric (12,542,100) (12,542,100) Capital Improvements - Electric, WW, Water (13,594,880) (3,349,150) (2,315,730) (7,930,000) Capital Improvements - Other Enterprise Funds (788,212) Included Capital Improvements - GCP, Streets & SRF (7,384,193) Capital Improvements -Special Revenue Funds (650,000) NIA Debt Service - General (1,887,462) General Fund Interfund Transfers (6,829,976) (38,026) (2,815,800) (2,413,850) (286,300) Interfund Charges (7,494,879) (2,826,089) (878,043) (869,320) (641,806) Budgeted operating expenditures 34,230,869 10,759,432 3,237,404 4,735,149 2,630,686 Percentage reserve requirements: 60 days - 16.67% 5,705,145 1,793 239 539,567 789,192 438,448 75 days - 20.83% 7,131,431 1 2,241,548 674,459 986,489 548,060 90 days - 25% 8,557,717 2,689,858 809,351 F 1,183,7871 F 657,672 09/30/00 RESERVE BALANCES: Totals for all expenditures 75 days 7,131,431 8,500,000 ' Note: The city-wide contingency reserve requirement is 75 days of operating expenses. Only the General, Stormwater Drainage, Wastewater, Water, and Convention and Visitors Bureau SRF have a specific minimum fund reserve requirement. All excess reserves for City expenditures in funds that do not have a speck fund requirement are held in other operating funds. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 339 Minimum Minimum Days Amount Amount Fund Required Required Included Electric Fund NIA 674,459 3,400,000 General Fund 60 days 1,793,239 2,000,000 Sanitation Fund NIA Na 50,000 Stormwater Drainage Fund NIA 50,000 65,000 Wastewater Fund 90 days 657,672 875,000 Water Fund 90 days 1,183,787 1,700,000 Airport Fund NIA n/a 150,000 Streets Special Revenue Fund NIA n/a 153,000 Convention & Visitors Bureau SRF 75 days 56,830 57,000 Recreation Programs SRF N/A nfa 50,000 All other City Funds expenditures NIA' 2,715,444 Na Totals for all expenditures 75 days 7,131,431 8,500,000 ' Note: The city-wide contingency reserve requirement is 75 days of operating expenses. Only the General, Stormwater Drainage, Wastewater, Water, and Convention and Visitors Bureau SRF have a specific minimum fund reserve requirement. All excess reserves for City expenditures in funds that do not have a speck fund requirement are held in other operating funds. REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 339 This page intentionally left blank. REFERENCE 340 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 UTILITY RATE SCHEDULE PROPOSED FOR 10/1/00 ELECTRIC RATES (last increase 10/1/91) All Customers Purchased Power Cost Adjustment Built into Energy Charge Residential Sales Tax Inside City Limits: 1 % of total electric charges Outside City None Limits: Commercial Sales Tax Inside City Limits: 7.25% of total electric charges Outside City Limits: 6.25% of total electric charges Seasons Summer: May through October billings Winter: November through April billings Residential Service Customer Charge: $6.00 per month Energy Charge: Summer: $0.0678 per kWh Winter: $0.0678 per kWh for first 1,000 kWh per month $0.0475 per kWh for additional kWh y Small General Service Customer Charge: $12.00 per month Energy Charge: Summer: $0.0654 per kWh Winter: $0.0654 per kWh for the first 5,000 kWh per month $0.0554 per kWh for additional kWh School Service Customer Charge: $12.00 per month Energy Charge: Summer: $0.0760 per kWh Winter: $0.0760 per kWh for the first 5,000 kWh per month $0.0660 per kWh for additional kWh Water & Wastewater Pumping Service Customer Charge: $12.00 per month Energy Charge: Summer: $0.0650 per kWh Winter: $0.0550 per kWh Large General Service Customer Charge: $20.00 per month Demand Charge: Summer: $7.70 per kW, but not less than $385.00 Winter: $6.90 per kW, but not less than $345.00 REFERENCE __ ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 341 UTILITY RATE SCHEDULE (CONT.) Energy Charge: Summer: $0.0380 per kWh Winter: $0.0290 per kWh Load Factor Credit: $0.008 per kWh for all kWh in excess of 400 kWh per kW Curtailable Power Credit Available to customers with demand exceeding 50 kW; contact the Energy Services Manager for details Guard Light Service Customer Charge: $7.50 per lamp Experimental Interruptible Power Service Contact the Energy Services Manager for Details 3/4 inch meter 1 inch meter 11/2 inch meter 2 inch meter 3 inch meter 4 inch meter 6 inch meter Cost per 1,000 gallons: 0 Thru 24,000 Gallons 25,000 Thru 39,000 Gallons 40,000 Thru. 59,000 Gallons 60,000 And Up Customer Charge: Cost per 1,000 gallons: 342 WATER RATES (last base rate increase 10/1/91) Customer Charge Inside Ci Outside City $16.50 per month $17.85 per month $21.80 per month $26.00 per month $43.00 per month $63.00 per month $111.00 per month $1.95 $21.80 per month $23.40 per month $28.00 per month $32.00 per month $54.00 per month $74.00 per month $133.00 per month $2.27 CONSERVATION WATER RATES (effective 6/1/97) Residential Only Effective on Billings June 1 - September 30 Inside City Per 1,000 Gallons $1.95 2.50 3.50 4.50 Outside City Per 1,000 Gallons WASTEWATER RATES (last increase 4/1/92) (based upon average winter water use) $11.75 per month $2.70 $2.27 2.90 4.10 5.25 REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 UTILITY RATE SCHEDULE (CONT.) GARBAGE RATES (last increase 10/1/98) All customers inside City limits must pay garbage. All customers outside City limits who receive City utilities and live on a City garbage route may select City garbage pickup. Sales Tax on Garbage Service: Residential Rate: Non -Residential Rate: Residential and Commercial Inside City Limits: 7.25% Outside City Limits: 6.25% Inside City Limits - $10.85 (includes recycling) Outside City Limits - $13.25 Varies - Rates will be set by type, amount and frequency of service. STORMWATER DRAINAGE FEES (last increase 10/1/98) All residential water customers within the city limits must pay a monthly charge of $2.25. Non-residential water customers within the city limits must pay $2.25 per unit (2,088 square feet) which is calculated on the total square footage of impervious cover on the property. DEPOSIT REQUIREMENTS AND SERVICE CHARGES Residential Deposit - None with qualifying letter of credit or $100 (Cash, Check, or Credit Card) Non -Residential Deposit - 1/6 Estimated Annual Bill (Cash, Check, Credit Cardor Letter of Credit from a bank) Late Payment - 10% Insufficient Check Charge - $15.00 Disconnect Service Charge for Delinquent Bill or Insufficient Check - $20.00 Meter Reread Charge at Customer's Request - $10.00 Temporary Service (5 days) - $35.00 New or Transfer Account Charge - $25.00 plus $25.00 during non -business hours or same day connections Meter Test - At Cost Credit Cards: Discover, VISA and MasterCard accepted REFERENCE __. ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 343 p� t� 1� tq 0 In addition to the permanent advisory boards and commissions listed, the Council also appoints temporary advisory committees from time to time to address specific, short term issues. The 2000 Membership of Advisory Boards & Commissions include: Airport Advisory Board. Studies and makes recommendations to the City Council regarding operations and facility improvements of the municipal airport. Ensures that the municipal airport is efficiently and adequately meeting the needs of the City and the air transportation industry. Penny Burt Rex Cloud Dave Guggemos Steve Johnston John Olson Harvey Sandal Glenn Watkins Board of Adjustment. Hears and decides appeals that allege that there was an error in any order, requirement, decision, or determination made by a City administrative officer, department, or board. Also acts on applications that are submitted for a variance or a special exception to City zoning regulations. Rhonda Faught William Nahay Patrick Walsh Patricia Hershey Joseph Pondrum Sarah Milburn Sheila Johnson Charles Parker Gabe Sansing Building Standards Commission Hears appeals and renders decisions on rulings by City building inspectors or officials in regard to code interpretation, enforcement, and substandard housing or structures within the City. Michael Barnes John Gavurnik Wallis Grabowsky Jim Schiller Robert Jacobson Neal Russell Roger Stuth Farrell Prewitt Billy Strickland Stuart Smith Lloyd Potts Georgetown Convention & Visitors Board. Develops and advises the City Council on plans to promote convention business and tourism in Georgetown. Jan Nowlin Lisa Fisher Joella Broussard Martha Watkins Bill Lipscomb Lorraine Crowley Suzanna Pukys Gael Dillard Cynthia Behling Lawrence Simpson Rusty Winkstern Historic Preservation Commission. Adopts regulations and restrictions for the preservation of historical places and areas of historical significance. Also establishes criteria for granting or denying requests for alterations to buildings in established historical districts. Clare Easley Scherry Chapman Joe Burke James Dillard John Treuhardt Jerome Vacek David Voelter Jack Noble David Hays James Fowler Kari Hunt Housing Authority Board. Approves policies which will enable the Housing Authority staff to provide safe, sanitary and comfortable housing to low-income people in the Georgetown area. Jose Gonzalez Joe Warren Velta Simmons Peggy Kendall Diane Sansom REFERENCE 344 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Library Advisory Board. Makes recommendations regarding the development of the book collection, programming, and other services provided by the Georgetown Public Library. Samuel Arant Zora Evans Lisa Hopkins Nell Dickson Jean Ehnebuske Dorothy Hagen Joe Case Helen Jenkins Claire Vogler Parks and Recreation Board. Recommends, to the City Council, uses of parkland and parks/recreational facilities and improvements in programs, activities, and facilities to meet community recreation needs and interests. Jim Atencio Jean Houck David Rinn Douglas Blackard Wesley Kidd John Philpott Tracy Dubcak Brenna Nedbalek Ben White Planning & Zoning Commission. Studies and reviews plans and recommends to City Council action to be taken in regard to City growth and development and comprehensive community planning. Also, makes recommendations and acts as a hearing board on zoning requests. Drafts new development regulations and conducts periodic review of plans and regulations. Marjorie Herbert Don Nadon Jack Noble Charles Parker Sarah Milburn Patrick Walsh Gabe Sansing Williamson County & Cities Health District. Advises state, county and local elected officials on the status of public health matters in Williamson County. Lettie Lee, Georgetown (remaining members appointed by County Commissioners Court) Margaret Fink, Round Rock Katherine Galloway, Cedar Park Scholley Bubenik, Taylor Vernon O'Rourke, Commissioners Court Mary Faith Sterk, Commissioners Court Karen Wilson, Director of Health District REFERENCE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 345 / — D -" 007> — Q I �,G _; No� ND ED This page intentionally left blank. REFERENCE 346 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Abatement - A complete or partial cancellation of.a levy imposed by a governmental unit. Abatements usually apply to tax levies, special assessments and service charges. The City of Georgetown has four 7 - year tax abatement agreements. All agreements are in the last three years of their term in 1999/00. Accrual Accounting - A basis of accounting in which revenues are recognized in the accounting period in which they are earned, and expenses are recognized in the period in which they are incurred. Administrative Charges - The charges imposed upon a fund for support services provided by another fund. For example, the Accounting Department (Joint Services Fund) provides services to the Electric Fund, therefore the Joint Services Fund charges the Electric Fund for these services based on reasonable allocation methods. Adopted - Adopted, as used in fund summaries and department and division summaries within the budget document, represents the budget as approved by formal action of the City Council which sets the spending limits for the fiscal year. Ad Valorem - In proportion to value. A basis for levy of taxes on property. Amended Budget - Includes the adopted budget for a fiscal year, plus any budget amendments or budget transfers. Annexed Property - Land previously outside the City limits that becomes part of the City during a year through the legal process of incorporation. Annual Operating Plan -The Century Plan requires the preparation and adoption of an annual operating plan, or budget, that focuses on the Policies, Ends and Means of the Century Plan as a way to account for projects and work activities initiated by the City. The Annual Operating Plan acts as the City's short range guideline for revenue projections, cost of service budgeting and project planning and demonstrates incremental progress towards the implementation of the Century Plan. The Annual GLOSSARY/INDEX ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Operating Plan includes programs, projects andwork activities for the one, two and five year time horizons. Appropriation - An authorization made by the City Council through an approved budget which permits the City to incur obligations and to make expenditures of resources. Appropriations lapse at the end of the fiscal year. Assessed Valuation - A valuation set upon real estate or other property by the County Appraisal District to be used as a basis for levying taxes. Asset - Resources owned or held which have monetary value. Audit - A comprehensive review of the manner in which the government's resources were actually utilized. A certified public accountant issues an opinion over the presentation of financial statements, tests the controls over the safekeeping of assets and makes recommendations for improvements where necessary. Balance Sheet - A financial statement that discloses the assets, liabilities, reserves and balances of a specific fund as of a specific date. Base Budget - The on-going expense for personnel, operating services and the replacement of supplies and equipment to maintain service levels. The base budget does not include new programs or projects, which are approved on an individual basis. Bond - A written promise, generally under seal, to pay a specified sum of money, called the face value, at a fixed time in the future, called the date of maturity, and carrying interest at a fixed rate, usually payable periodically. The difference between a note and a bond is that the latter usually runs for a longer period of time and requires greater legal formality. Budget - A plan of operation embodying an estimate of proposed expenditures for a given period and the proposed means of financing them. The City of Georgetown's budget is called the Annual Operating Plan. 347 Budget by Program/Function - A breakdown of the annual budget that groups like expenditures by the type of program or function. Interfund charges and Internal Service fund premiums or leases are eliminated for presentation purposes. Budget Year - The fiscal year of the City which begins October 1 and ends September 30. Capital Budget - A plan of proposed capital outlays and the means of financing them for the current fiscal period. Capital or Capital Outlay - See the Capitalization Policy in this Budget for a definition of this term. Capital Improvement Program - The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is a comprehensive plan of capital investment projects which identifies priorities as to need, method of financing, and project costs and revenues that will result during a five year period. The program is a guide for identifying current and future fiscal year requirements and becomes the basis for determining the annual capital budget. CIP or Capital Projects - A group of planned expenditures for construction of large scale assets, such as a water line. Significant maintenance projects, such as street overlay, are also considered capital projects, but are capitalized only in the event they extend the life of the asset. Capital Recovery Fees - Capital Recovery Fees are developer paid infrastructure fees adopted under Chapter 395 of Texas Local Government Code or as part of a development agreement. Capital Replacement Fund - vehicle which allows purchase of operating capital items on a long- term basis through budgeted annual payments and transfers during the fiscal year. The City's Fleet and Information Services Internal Service Funds act as capital replacement funds. Cash Accounting - A basis of accounting in which transactions are recorded when cash is either received or expended. 348 Century Plan - The City's comprehensive plan that acts as a cornerstone for the City's present and future development and reflects the aspirations of the citizens for their City and describes an ongoing process by which Georgetown will strive to enhance its quality of life. The Century Plan is currently in effect until 2010 and contains the Policy Plan, which contains the overriding policies and administrative structure of the Plan and the Functional Plan elements, which address specific elements is detail. City Charter - The document that establishes the City as an incorporated political subdivision (municipal government) in accordance with the statutes of the State of Texas. The charter provides the form, roles and powers of the municipal government that is the City of Georgetown. Conservation Rate - A stepped water rate, effective only during the summer months for residential customers, to encourage water conservation. All revenue generated from these increased rates is put aside to be used for future expansion of water treatment plants. Contingency - A budgetary appropriation reserve set aside for emergencies or unforeseen expenditures not otherwise budgeted for. The primary contingency account requires City Council approval for all expenditures. Contingency Reserves - A portion of the budgeted ending fund balance or working capital that is not available for appropriation. The intent of the reserves are to provide flexibility, should actual revenues fall short of budgeted revenues and to provide adequate resources to implement budgeted expenditures without regard to the actual cash flow of the fund. Coverage Ratio - A term defined by revenue bond indenture. Refers to the ratio of net revenues of the electric, water and wastewater systems, after all maintenance and operations expenses are considered, to total debt service. The minimum ratio required by the current bond indenture is 1.50. GLOSSARY/INDEX ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Debt Margin - The difference between the maximum amount of debt that is legally permitted and the amount of debt outstanding subject to the limitation. Debt Payments - Scheduled payments of principle and interest on outstanding debt. The payments are often referred to as "debt service." Debt Principle Reduction - The scheduled yearly payment that reduces the amount of outstanding debt. Debt Service - The City's obligation to pay principal and interest on bonded debt. A. Self -Supported Debt - Debt for which the City has pledged a repayment source separate from its general tax revenues (e.g. stormwater bonds repaid from stormwater drainage fees.) B. Tax Supported - Debt for which the City has pledged a repayment from its property taxes. Debt to Valuation Ratio -The amount of taxable debt outstanding as a percentage of the taxable property assessment. This is a common benchmark used to determine the appropriateness of a city's property tax supported general obligation debt (including Certificates of Obligation) . Dedicated Property Tax - The portion of property taxes that is set aside for a specific use, such as street maintenance. The City Council has dedicated five cents of the property tax rate to street capital improvements. Del E. Webb Corporation (Del Webb) - see Sun City Georgetown. Delinquent Taxes - Taxes that remain unpaid after the date on which a penalty for nonpayment is attached. Property tax statements are mailed out in October and become delinquent if unpaid by January 31. Department - A specific functional area within a City division. GLOSSARY/INDEX ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Depreciation - The process of estimating and recording the expired useful life of a fixed asset which is used to distribute its cost over its revenue producing years. Developmental Assets - A term coined by Search Institute for 40 individual building blocks that children and adolescents need to grow up competent, caring and healthy. Division - An administrative unit of the City having management responsibility for a group of departments. Effective Tax Rate - Texas law prescribes a formula for calculating the effective tax rate for cities. The net effect of the formula is to produce a tax rate that goes down when property values rise (and vice versa) to generate a rate that produces approximately the same revenue as the year before. The formula makes adjustments for additional debt service, newly annexed property, and newly constructed property. If the tax rate is raised by three percent or more over the prior year's effective tax rate, State law requires that special notices must be posted and published. If the increase is more than 8%, the increase above 8% is subject to a possible rollback election by the voters. Employee Benefits - For the purpose of budgeting, this term refers to the City's costs of health insurance, pension contributions, social security contributions, workers' compensation and unemployment insurance costs. Encumbrance - Any commitment of funds against an appropriation. It may be in the form of a purchase order or a contract. Encumbrance accounting is formally integrated into the accounting system for expenditure control purposes. An encumbrance differs from an account payable as follows: an account payable represents a legal liability to pay and results from the goods and/or services requested in a purchase order or contract having been delivered to the City. Until such time as the goods and/or services are delivered, the commitment is referred to as an encumbrance. 349 End - Part of the "Ends and Mean's" concept adopted by the City Council to represent an improved way to manage the City. Ends are specific targets based upon the 13 policies found in the Century Plan - Policy Plan. There is at least one end for each policy area. These statements allow the City organization to focus first on a finalrp oduct such as "a dynamic and positive business climate" rather than on therp ocess of making that product, such as maintaining sewer lines, planning downtown improvements and keeping emergency service response times low. Enterprise Fund - A fund established to finance and account for operations (1) that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises - where the intent of the governing body is that the costs (expenses, including depreciation) of providing goods or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges; or (2) where the governing body has decided that periodic determination of revenues earned, expenses incurred, and/or net income is appropriate for capital maintenance, public policy, management control, accountability, or other purpose. Executive Limitations - Specific boundaries stated as part of the City's governance model. The boundaries serve as the limits within which staff must accomplish the means or goals. Expenditures - If the accounts are kept on the accrual basis this term designates total charges incurred, whether paid or unpaid, including expenses, provision for retirement of debt not reported as liability of the fund from which retired, and capital outlays. If accounts are kept on the cash basis, the term covers only actual disbursements for these purposes. Encumbrances are not considered expenditures. Expense - Charges incurred, whether paid or unpaid, for operation, maintenance, and interest, and other charges which are presumed to benefit the current fiscal period. Legal provisions sometimes make it necessary to treat as expenses charges whose benefits extend over future periods. Fiscal Year - An accounting period, typically twelve months, to which the annual budget applies and at the 350 end of which a city determines its financial position and results of operations. The City's fiscal year is October 1 through September 30. Fixed Assets - Assets of a long-term character which are intended to continue to be held or used, such as land, buildings, machinery, furniture and other equipment. Franchise fees - A fee that a government imposes to permit the continuing use of public property and right of ways, such as city utility poles, streets, etc. Full Time Equivalent (FTE) - A part-time position converted to the decimal equivalent of a full- time position based on 2,080 hours per year, or a full value of one for a full-time position. Functional Plan - Elements of the Century Plan which describe 15 policy plan categories that detail the manner in which the Policy Plan will be fulfilled. City Council has adopted to date four Functional Plan elements: Economic Development Strategic Plan, Development Plan, Parks and Recreation Plan and Facilities and Services Plan. The preparation and adoption of the Functional Plans, including Land Use, Transpiration, Utilities, Environmental, Citizen Participation, Housing, Health and Human Services, Historic Preservation, Airport, Annexation, Urban Design and Capital Improvements, are to be completed in subsequent years. Fund - An independent fiscal and accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts recording cash and/or other resources, together with all related liabilities, obligations, reserves, and equities which are segregated for the purpose of carrying on in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. Fund Balance - The excess of a fund's assets over its liabilities and reserves. Funding Source - Identifies the source of revenue to fund appropriations. GLOSSARY/1NDEX ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 General Fund - The fund that is available for any legal authorized purpose and which is therefore used to account for all revenues and all activities except those required to be accounted for in another fund. Note: The General Fund is used to finance the ordinary operations of a governmental unit. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) - The uniform minimum standards and guidelines for financial accounting and reporting. The primary authoritative body on the application of GAAP to state and local governments is the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). General Obligation Debt - Tax supported bonded debt which is backed by the full faith and credit of the City. Geographic Information System - A computer system, which transforms geographically -referenced data into maps and other geographic relationship information. Georgetown Industrial Foundation - A non- profit corporation, whose purpose is to attract, support and develop businesses in the community. Grant - A contribution by one governmental unit to another. The contribution is usually made to aid in the support of a specified function (for example, education), but it is sometimes also for general purposes. Impact Fees - Fees assessed to developers to help defray a portion of the costs that naturally result from increased development. By Texas law, these fees must be used for capital acquisition or debt service relating to capital projects. Indicator - A benchmark used to measure performance or workload or compare against a predetermined standard. Infrastructure - Roads, bridges, curbs and gutters, streets, sidewalks, drainage systems, lighting systems, water lines, wastewater lines and other improvements that are installed for the common good. GLOSSARY/INDEX ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 Integrative Culture - An internal culture with an emphasis on alignment with values, a focus on teamwork and cooperation, customer service and empowerment of staff fostered through a coaching, participatory management style rather than a directive one. Interfund Transfer - A movement of cash between funds for the purpose of return on investment or funding projects and operations. Internal Service Fund (ISF) - A fund established to finance and account for services and commodities furnished by a designated department or agency to other departments or agencies within a single governmental unit or to other governmental units. Amounts expended by the fund are restored thereto, either from operating earnings or by transfers from other funds, so that the original fund capital is kept intact. ISF Premiums - Fees charged by one fund to other departments based on replacement costs and usage costs for vehicles, computers and buildings and administrative fees charged to funds based on service needs. Means - The method, or process, by which the City Manager and the City of Georgetown organization plans to achieve the Ends specified by the City Council. By allowing City staff to focus on the means of the issue, the City Council is freed to discuss and define the long term direction of the City, its ends. Modified Accrual Accounting - A basis of accounting in which expenditures are accrued but revenues are accounted for when it becomes measurable and available. Operating Budget - This budget, associated with providing on-going services to citizens, includes general expenditures such as personal services, professional services, maintenance costs, supplies and operating capital items. 351 Personnel Expenditures - For the purpose of budgeting, this term refers to all wages and related items: regular pay, premium pay, longevity pay, social security, life insurance, retirement plan contributions, health insurance and workers' compensation insurance. Policy Plan - A part of the Century Plan that provides a general background for the plan and sets the policies, ends and means which will guide the City's actions until the year 2010. Program - A group of related activities performed by one or more organizational units for the purpose of accomplishing a function for which the City is responsible. Projected Actual - An estimate of year ending balances for all accounts used for budgeting purposes. Property Taxes - Used to describe all revenue received in a period from current taxes and delinquent taxes. Property taxes are levied on both real and personal property according to the property's valuation and the tax rate. Public Improvement District (PID) - An area where property owners are charged a special levy to defray part or all of the costs of specific improvements or services that are presumed to be a general benefit to the public and of special benefit to such properties. Reservation — A balance of funds that are set aside by policy for a specific purpose or to draw upon for emergencies (as in contingency reservation). Revenue - The yield of taxes and other monetary resources that the City collects and receives into the treasury for public use. For those revenues which are recorded on the accrual basis, this term designates additions to assets which (1) do not increase any liability; (2) do not represent the recovery of an expenditure; (3) do not represent contributions of fund capital in enterprise and internal service funds. The same definition applies to those cases where revenue are recorded on the modified accrual or cash basis, except that additions would be partially or entirely to cash. 352 Revenue Bonds - Bonds of the City which are supported by the revenue generating capacity of the water and wastewater system. Service Improvement Program (SIP) Fees - Charges paid, on a per unit cost basis, by a developer (currently Del Webb Corporation only) for a portion of the cost of infrastructure improvements such as fire protection, road improvements, electric, wastewater and water system improvements needed to service a development. Fees are set as part of a Council approved development agreement. Special Revenue Fund - A fund used to account for the proceeds of specific revenue sources (other than special assessments, expendable trusts, or for major capital projects) that are legally restricted to expenditure for specified purposes. Special Utility District - A legally separate political subdivision under Texas law to provide utility services. Sun City Georgetown - Del E. Webb Corporation (Del Webb) broke ground in May 1995 on a 9,500 home, 5,300 acre active retirement community called Sun City Georgetown. The City's development agreement with Del Webb provides for fire protection, wastewater, water and electric services, and collector and arterial street improvements, as well as annexation as each phase is started. The City is providing the off- site improvements with the construction and carrying costs offset by special impact fees, paid by Del Webb, without cash shortfalls or increases in overall service rates for water and wastewater. Sun City Georgetown had 1,331 occupied homes as of August 1, 1998. Surplus - The excess of the assets of a fund over its liabilities; or if the fund has other resources and obligations; the excess of resources over the obligations. The term should not be used without a properly descriptive adjective unless its meaning is apparent from the context. See also Fund Balance. GLOSSARYANDEX ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000101 Tax Base - The total value of all real, personal and mineral property in the City as of January 1 st of each year, as certified by the County Appraisal Board. The tax base represents net value after all exemptions. Tax Levy - The resultant product when the tax rate per one hundred dollars is multiplied by the tax base. Tax Rate - Total tax rate is set by Council and is made up of two components: debt service and operations rates. It is the amount levied for each $100 of assessed valuation. Tax Roll - The official list showing the amount of taxes levied against each taxpayer or property. Times Coverage Ratio - A calculation of the revenue available divided by the combined debt payment requirement of the utilities,. This ratio is one indication of the City's ability to pay its revenue debt obligations. Transfers In/Out - Amounts transferred from one fund to another to assist in financing the services or programs for the recipient fund. Unencumbered Fund Balance - For budget purposes, the unencumbered fund balance is the amount of undesignated fund balance of a fund available for allocation. Urban Design - The unique character of Georgetown formed primarily by its man made physical features. User Charges - The payment of a fee for direct receipt of a public service by the party benefiting from the service. Working Capital - For enterprise funds, the excess of current assets over current liabilities. Working capital of a fund is important because budgeted expenditures of the fund must be provided for from cash receipts during the year supplemented by working capital carried over from prior years, if any. GLOSSARY/INDEX -- ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 353 Accounting........................................................................................................................................................152 Advisory Boards & Commissions.....................................................................................................................344 Airport.......................................... ....................................................................................................................106 AnimalServices................................................................................................................................................108 Annual Operating Plan Preparation. .................................................................................................................... 10 Budget& Financial Policies..............................................................................................................................323 Capital Projects & Five Year Plan....................................................................................................................265 CityCouncil......................................................................................................................................................214 CityManager's Office.......................................................................................................................................216 Community Owned Utilities Administration......................................................................................................72 CommunityProfile..............................................................................................................................................18 Community Services Administration................................................................................................................102 Contingency Reserve Requirements Worksheet ........ ......... ......._ ......., ........_. ........ ..... ....._.............339 Convention & Visitors Bureau..........................................................................................................................142 CriticalNeeds....................................................................................................................................................306 Customer Service (Meter Readers -incorporated in Utility Office department)................................................176 DebtManagement & Policy..............................................................................................................................289 Development Process Team..............................................................................................................................128 DevelopmentSupport ........................................................................................................................................130 Economic Development Administration...........................................................................................................140 Electric................................................................................................................................................................74 Employee & Organizational Services...............................................................................................................220 Ends & Means - Community Owned Utilities....................................................................................................65 Ends& Means - Community Services................................................................................................................97 Ends & Means - Development Services............................................................................................................121 Ends & Means — Economic Development........................................................................................................137 Ends & Means - Finance & Administration......................................................................................................151 Ends & Means - Fire Services...........................................................................................................................181 Ends & Means - Information Resources..........................................................................................................195 Ends& Means - List of Ends................................................................................................................................3 Ends & Means - Management Services............................................................................................................205 Ends & Means - Parks & Recreation................................................................................................................229 Ends & Means - Police Services.......................................................................................................................247 FacilitiesMaintenance.......................................................................................................................................160 FinanceAdministration.....................................................................................................................................158 FireAdministration...........................................................................................................................................186 FireOperations..................................................................................................................................................188 Fire Prevention & Community Analysis ............................................... ..190 .......................................................... FleetManagement.............................................................................................................................................164 FundSummaries..................................................................................................................................................44 GeneralGovernment Contracts................................................._.......................................................................104 General Debt Service (General Obligation Debt) .................................... .........................291 ................................ GeorgetownCentury Plan.....................................................................................................................................1 GLOSSARY/INDEX 354 ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 - Glossary...........................................................................................................................................................347 Human Resources.........................................................................(See Employee & Organizational Services) Information Resources Operations...................................................................................................................198 Information Resources Capital Replacement...................................................................................................200 InspectionServices...........................................................................................................................................132 Internal Service Premiums...................................................... ...... 312 .................................................................... LegalServices...................................................................................................................................................218 MainStreet........................................................................................................................................................146 MunicipalCourt ................................................................................................................................................170 Ordinances........................................................................................................................................................ 314 Organization........................................................................................................................................................ l l Parks.................................................................................................................................................................. 234 PatrolServices.................................................................................................................................................. 260 Personnel......................................................................................................................................................... 299 PoliceAdministration....................................................................................................................................... 252 Police Information Management.......................................................................................................................258 84 ProfessionalStandards......................................................................................................................................262 80 ProposedDebt....................................................................................................................................................296 PublicLibrary ...................................................................................................................................................110 PumpMaintenance............................................................................................................................................. 78 Purchasing& Properties...................................................................................................................................174 Recreation......................................................................................................................................................... 240 SafetyServices..................................................................................................................................................224 Sanitation..........................................................................................................................................................114 SpecialOperations............................................................................................................................ ........ 256 StormwaterDrainage.......................................................................................................................................... 82 Streets.................................................................................................................................................................. 84 SystemsEngineering........................................................................................................................................... 80 TransfersBetween Funds..................................................................................................................................311 TransmittalLetter................................................................................................................................................... i UtilityDebt Service.......................................................................................................................................... 294 - Utility Office.....................................................................................................................................................176 UtilityRates Schedule....................................................................................................................................... 341 - Water Distribution.............................................................................................................................................. 86 WaterTreatment Facilities.................................................................................................................................. 88 WaterContracts.................................................................................................................................................. 89 WastewaterCollection........................................................................................................................................ 90 Wastewater Treatment Facilities........................................................................................................................ 92 WastewaterContracts......................................................................................................................................... 93 GLOSSARY/INDEX -__ ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN ELEMENT 2000/01 355 CITY of GEoRGETo wN The following awards attest to the recognized excellence of the various operations of the government. 2000 1996 (cont.) Government Finance Officers Association National Recreation & Parks Association Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for the City's Annual Operating Gold Medal Award Finalist for excellence in the field of Parks and Plan and Program of Services for the Fiscal Years 1990 through 2000 Recreation management (Eleven consecutive years) 1999 Government Finance Officers Association Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting - Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for Fiscal Years 1987 through 1999 (Thirteen consecutive years) National Recreation & Parks Association Gold Medal Award Winner for excellence in the field of Parks and Recreation management Certificate of Recognition Awarded to Victim Services by the Austin Police Department for distinguished service to victims and their families Del Webb's Sun City Georgetown Land Development Awarded to Development Services in recognition and appreciation of dedication to the success of Del Webb's Sun City Georgetown Texas Public Power Association Individual Customer Service Award for Utility Office Texas Municipal Utilities Association Outstanding municipal utility award for Community -Owned Utilities in recognition of significant improvements to their water, wastewater, and electrical utilities Teras Municipal League (TML) Innovation Award Municipal excellence award for the management innovations category for cities under 25,000 1998 Teras Recreation and Parks Society Gold Medal Award for Outstanding Accomplishments in Parks and Recreation Services, Facilities and Park Development US. Environmental Protection Agency -Region VI Regional Administrators Environmental Excellence Award for Public Water Supply Excellence in Operation & Management in the 113 Category -3,300 - 50,000 population served. (This award was also received in 1990) 3 CMA Silver Circle Award - Marketing Communications Campaign/Tools Teras Municipal Library Association Administrator of the Year 1997 3 CMA Award for Excellence - On Line Information Services for Cities & Counties over 200,000 (Joint effort with Williamson County) National Trust jar Historic Preservation & the Edward Jones Co. Great American Main Street Award Quality Texas Texas Quality Award recognition for Participation & Achievement in Quality (Police Services) Texas Public Power Association Award for "Overall Customer Service' - Georgetown Utility Office 1996 Environmental Protection Agency National Second Place Award Operations & Maintenance - Berry Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant Sam Walton Community Leader Award American Hometown Leadership Award to Mayor Pro Tem - Ferd Tonn TX Natural Resource Conservation Commission Pinnacle Award Operation & Maintenance Award - Small - Non -Discharging Plant - Berry Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant Texas Public Power Association Electric System Achievement Award 1995 3 CMA Silver Circle Award - Marketing Communications Plan for Cities Under 25,000 American Planning Association Outstanding Planning Award for Comprehensive Planning in a Small Jurisdiction for the Georgetown Century Plan Associated Texans Against Crime Outstanding Law Enforcement Award Police Executive Research Forum Herman Goldstein Excellence in Problem Solving Award Sam Walton Community Leader Award American Hometown Leadership Award to Mayor Leo Wood Texas Public Power Association "Best Newsletter" for City with less than 50,000 customers Texas Water Utilities Association Best Tasting Water - Surface Water (Three consecutive years) 1993 Association of Wholesale Customers ofthe LCRA Distinguished Service Award Lower Colorado River Authority Environmental Award - Energy Conservation Lower Colorado River Authority Environmental Award for Recycling Programs at the Georgetown Public Collection Station Texas Chapter ofAmerican Planning Association Community of the Year Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs Award for Affordable Housing & Community Partnerships Teras Department of Transportation, Division ofAviation Airport Manager of the Year for the State of Texas Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission Clean City 2000 - Governor's Award for Environmental Excellence Teras Recreation and Parks Society Gold Medal Award for Outstanding Accomplishments in Parks and Recreation Services, Facilities and Park Development Texas Water Commission Operation and Maintenance Excellence Award for best wastewater treatment system of its size in Texas U.S. Environmental Protection Agency -Region VI Administrators Environmental Excellence Award in five state region - Wastewater